Category: arte

17
Giu

DORA MAAR in Paris

The largest French retrospective ever devoted to Dora Maar (1907-1997) invites you to discover all the facets of her work, through more than five hundred works and documents. Initially a professional photographer and surrealist before becoming a painter, Dora Maar is an artist of undeniable renown. Far beyond the image, to which she is all too often limited, of her intimate relationship with Picasso, this exhibition retraces the life of an accomplished artist and a free and independent intellectual.

The exhibition is organized by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, in coproduction with the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and in collaboration with the Tate Modern (London).

PRESENTATION BY THE CURATORS
“To Dora of the varied, always beautiful, faces”. Lise Deharme’s dedication to her friend Dora Maar in a copy of Cœur de Pic (1937) poetically sums up the various facets of her artistic career: between photographer and painter, between youthful Surrealist revolution and the existential introspection that marked her painting activity after World War II.

With the collaboration of the J. Paul Getty Museum and in partnership with the Tate Modern, the exhibition organized by the Centre Pompidou aims to highlight, for the first time in a French museum, Dora Maar’s work as an artist, and not only as the muse and mistress of the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. Although for many she remains the model of La femme qui pleure, Dora Maar has nevertheless recently enjoyed critical reception and recognition in studies dedicated to Surrealism and photography. Several exhibitions organized by the Musée National d’Art Moderne, “Explosante fixe” and, more recently, “La Subversion des images” and “Voici Paris”, accorded a special place to Dora Maar’s Surrealist work, with enigmatic photographs such as Portrait d’Ubu and Le Simulateur, a photomontage that joined the museum’s collections in 1973.
The donation of Simulateur was the beginning of the Centre Pompidou’s continued interest in Dora Maar’s photographic work. The 1980s and 1990s were marked by various acquisitions, culminating in 2011 with the arrival of ten prints from the Bouqueret collection. In 2004 the purchase of her studio collection, consisting of some one thousand eight hundred and ninety negatives and two hundred and eighty contact prints, made the collection preserved in the Musée National d’Art Moderne one of the largest public collections of Dora Maar’s work. The recent digitization of negatives has now rendered her work accessible to a large audience of researchers and amateurs. Dora Maar is the only artist with a large portfolio of photographs preserved in the collections – Brancusi, Brassaï, Éli Lotar, Man Ray – who has not yet been the subject of a major exhibition project. Thanks to original archives and close scientific collaboration between the curatorship teams at the Centre Pompidou and the Getty Museum, the Dora Maar retrospective traces the development of this independent artist through more than four hundred works and documents: from her first commissions for fashion and advertising as a studio photographer, to her political commitments as witnessed by her street photographs, including her Surrealist activity and her meeting with Picasso. Lastly, the exhibition shines a special spotlight on her work as a painter, an activity to which she devoted herself for nearly forty years. Like her fellow female photographers, Laure Albin Guillot, Rogi André, Nora Dumas and Germaine Krull, who were active like her between the wars, Dora Maar belongs to the generation of women who liberated themselves professionally and socially through their work as photographers, a profession that was undergoing complete renewal with the development of the illustrated press and advertising. After studying graphic art in the Comité des Dames of the Union des Arts Décoratifs, Dora Maar trained in photography in the late 1920s. Like her mentor, Emmanuel Sougez, she preferred to work in a studio and collaborated with Pierre Kéfer, a set designer for films, from 1931 to 1935. “Kéfer-Dora Maar” became the name and the official credit for the studio, figuring in prints and publications at the time, even when Dora Maar or Pierre Kéfer worked alone on projects. Kéfer’s social flair enabled them to specialise in portraits, fashion and advertising illustrations for the cosmetics sector. This exhibition accords a central position to Dora Maar, a professional photographer endowed with an inventiveness that combined great technical mastery with a dreamlike universe that was much praised by her contemporaries.Continue Reading..

13
Giu

Mark Rothko

The Kunsthistorisches Museum presents for the first time in Austria an exhibition dedicated to the great American artist, Mark Rothko. Together with his contemporaries, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Rothko was one of the Abstract Expressionists, whose works made New York a centre of modern art. Rothko undertook three extensive trips to Europe, visiting as many churches, architectural monuments, and museums as he could. Art and architecture of the recent and more distant past are a vigorous presence in his work. Our exhibition presents an overview of Rothko’s artistic career from the early figurative works of the 1930s to those of the 1940s, and the classical abstract paintings of the 1950s and 1960s that made him famous.

Presenting a survey of his artistic career for the first time in Austria, the exhibition traces the radical development of Rothko’s work across more than four decades, from his early figurative paintings of the 1930s, through the transitional years of the 1940s to the groundbreaking mature works of the 1950s and 1960s. The artist’s children Kate and Christopher have been closely involved in the project from its very beginning, and have themselves kindly loaned a number of paintings from the family collection. Presented within the Kunsthistorisches Museum, whose historical collections span some 5,000 years of human creativity from Ancient Egypt to the Baroque, the exhibition provides a unique opportunity to examine Rothko’s deep and sustained interest in the art of the past. From his earliest visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York as a student in the 1920s, Rothko dedicated himself to the study of classical art, architecture and mythology, early Italian gold-ground painting, the Renaissance and the Dutch Golden Age. The exhibition will examine the direct influence of his voyages to Europe between 1950 and 1966, journeys based almost entirely around the viewing of churches, chapels and Old Master paintings in Venice, Rome, Florence, Siena, Arezzo, Tarquinia, Assisi, Spoleto, Paris, Chartres, Lascaux, Amsterdam, Brussels, Antwerp and London. It will explore the significance of specific places on the development of his mature work, from the frescoes of Fra Angelico in the convent of San Marco, Florence, the Baptistery of Santa Maria Assunta in Torcello, and the Villa of Mysteries in Pompeii, to the temples of Paestum and Michelangelo’s Laurentian Library in Florence.

Through major loans, including an entire gallery of large-scale Seagram Murals from the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., the exhibition will reveal how Rothko learnt from the techniques of the Old Masters, layering colour in the manner of Titian and developing in his mature work a sense of “inner light” similar to that of Rembrandt. When Rothko broke with tradition in the latter part of his life to create a radical new form of artistic expression, he did so with extensive knowledge and respect for what had come before. In the words of the late critic John Berger: “he did nothing else but look back in a way such as no painter before had ever done.” He was the most serious of artists, and addressed the most serious of subjects: the sacred, the spiritual, the tragic and the timeless. With unsparing intensity and a total commitment to risk, he created a form of human drama that continues to move and inspire artists, curators and the general public to this day.Continue Reading..

11
Giu

Claudia Margadonna – Natura Invisibile

Il secondo evento nel calendario stagionale della Orizzonti Arte Contemporanea di Ostuni è affidato all’artista milanese Claudia Margadonna che, reduce dalla grande esposizione presso le Filanda di Soncino, propone in galleria una selezione di dipinti di grandi dimensioni per la mostra Natura Invisibile.

L’artista ci parla del suo lavoro, raccontandoci quanto la natura sia fonte determinante di ispirazione nella sua opera:
“Il contatto con la natura genera in me un senso di appagamento e connessione col mondo. Dipingo in assenza di progettualità e le immagini che appaiono appartengono sempre al mondo naturale. Il mio modo di dipingere è erratico, procedo per divagazioni, seguendo il libero fluire della pennellata, come trasportata da una forza invisibile, alla scoperta di paesaggi naturali e immaginari. Mi muovo in uno stato di trasognamento, le immagini appaiono da sé, provenienti chissà da quale mondo interiore o arcano, semplicemente seguo questo flusso alla scoperta di nuovi elementi che mi si delineano dinanzi. Non rappresento in modo realistico la natura, ciò che mi interessa è evocare, cogliere e trasporre sulla tela le forze che muovono la natura stessa. L’opera è il frutto della connessione tra l’energia che permea l’esistenza ed il mio modo dinamico di dipingere. Riversando la mia gestualità nell’opera, anch’essa, di riflesso, mi restituisce le sue vibrazioni di colori, forme e materia. Si stabilisce così una forte connessione tra natura, vita e opera. Essendo per me imprescindibile il rapporto con il mondo naturale, il mio invito, anche in questa personale, è quello di riappropriarci di uno stile di vita che sia più in sintonia con la natura e teso alla sua salvaguardia”.

Natura Invisibile
Opere di Claudia Margadonna
INAUGURAZIONE in galleria DOMENICA 16 GIUGNO 2019 dalle ore 11.00 in poi
dal 16 al 29 giugno 2019

OrizzontiArteContemporanea
Piazzetta Cattedrale (centro storico)
72017 Ostuni (Br)
Tel. 0831.335373 – Cell. 348.8032506
info@orizzontiarte.it
F: Orizzontiartecontemporanea

Communication Manager
Amalia Di Lanno
info@amaliadilanno.com

03
Giu

Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies & Theatre of Metamorphoses

Museum Tinguely in Basel and Centre Pompidou-Metz present two parallel exhibitions devoted to the artist Rebecca Horn, offering complementary insights into the work of an artist who is among the most extraordinary of her generation. In the Body Fantasies show in Basel, which combines early performative works and later kinetic sculpture to highlight lines of development within her oeuvre, the focus is on transformation processes of body and machine. The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses explores in Metz the diverse theme of transformation from animist, surrealist and mechanistic perspectives, placing special emphasis on the role of film as a matrix within Horn’s work.

Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies at Museum Tinguely, Basel
Horn’s work is always inspired by the human body and its movement. In her early performative pieces of the 1960s and ’70s, this is expressed via the use of objects that serve as both extensions and constrictions of the body. Since the 1980s, her work has consisted primarily of kinetic machines and, increasingly, large-scale installations that “come alive” thanks to movement, the performing body being replaced by a mechanical actor. These processes of transformation between expanded bodies and animated machines in Horn’s oeuvre, which now spans five decades, are the focus of the Basel show.

Although in terms of materiality the mechanical constructions with their cold metal contrast starkly with Horn’s earlier body extensions made using fabric and feathers, they do pursue and develop their specific movements. The Body Fantasies exhibition juxtaposes performative works and later machine sculptures in order to follow the unfolding development of such motifs of movement. Divided up into four themes (Flapping Wings, Circulating, Inscribing, Touching) the Basel show traces the development of her works as “stations in a process of transformation” (Rebecca Horn), emphasizing this continuity in her work.

This major solo exhibition of her work—that includes body instruments and actions, films, kinetic sculptures and installations—is the first of its kind in Switzerland for more than 30 years, taking place at Museum Tinguely from June 5 to September 22, 2019.

The exhibition Body Fantasies in Basel is curated by Sandra Beate Reimann.

Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz
First major exhibition in France, after the one at the Musée des Beaux-arts de Grenoble in 1995, the show Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz follows the processes at work in Rebecca Horn’s research, from her preparatory drawings to her sculptures and installations.

The exhibition reveals in watermarks the affinities they maintain with certain figures of surrealism and their repetition and their transformation during the course of five decades of creation. Rebecca Horn perpetuates in a unique manner, the themes bequeathed to us by mythology and fairytales, such as metamorphosis into a hybrid or mythical creature, the secret life of the world of objects, the secrets of alchemy, or the fantasies of body-robots. These founding themes, which have been present in numerous currents of art history such as Mannerism or Surrealism, resonate in the exhibition. It highlights artists who have nourished her imagination, like Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Marcel Duchamp, or Jean Cocteau and whose works are matched with those of Rebecca Horn. This show is an invitation to share this discernible stage so that it becomes for the visitor-spectator “the free space of his own imagination.”

This exhibition will be taking place at Centre Pompidou-Metz from June 8 to January 13, 2020.
The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses in Metz is curated by Emma Lavigne and Alexandra Müller.

Rebecca Horn
Body Fantasies
June 5–September 22, 2019

Rebecca Horn
Theatre of Metamorphoses
June 8, 2019–January 13, 2020

Vernissage: June 4, 6:30pm
Museum Tinguely, Basel
Vernissage: June 7, 7pm
Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz

www.tinguely.ch
www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

Image: Rebecca Horn, White Body Fan, 1972. Photograph. Rebecca Horn Collection. © 2019 Rebecca Horn/ProLitteris, Zürich

16
Mag

Gina Pane. Action Psyché

“If I open my ‘body’ so that you can see your blood therein, it is for the love of you: the Other.” 
– Gina PANE, 1973

Gina Pane was instrumental to the development of the international Body Art movement, establishing a unique and corporeal language marked by ritual, symbolism and catharsis. The body, most often the artist’s own physical form, remained at the heart of her artistic practice as a tool of expression and communication until her death in 1990. Coming from the archives of the Galerie Rodolphe Stadler, the Parisian gallery of Pane who were themselves revolutionary in their presentation of avant-garde performance art, her exhibition at Richard Saltoun Gallery celebrates the artist’s pioneering career with a focus on the actions for which she is best known. It provides the most comprehensive display of the artist’s work in London since the Tate’s presentation in 2002.
Exploring universal themes such as love, pain, death, spirituality and the metaphorical power of art, Pane sought to reveal and transform the way we have been taught to experience our body in relation to the self and others. She defined the body as “a place of the pain and suffering, of cunning and hope, of despair and illusion.” Her actions strived to reconnect the forces of the subconscious with the collective memory of the human psyche, and the sacred or spiritual. In these highly choreographed events, Pane subjected herself to intense physical and mental trials, which ranged from desperately seeking to drink from a glass of milk whilst tied, breaking the glass and lapping at the shards with her mouth (Action Transfert, 1973); piercing her arm with a neat line of rose thorns (Action Sentimentale, 1973); to methodically cutting her eyelids and stomach with razor blades (Action Psyché, 1974);and boxing with herself in front of a mirror (Action Il Caso no. 2 sul ring, 1976) – all performed silently in front of gathered audiences. She interpreted the sacrifice and aestheticised risk of such actions as an expression of love for the ‘other’.
Actions were photographed by Francoise Masson, to whom Pane provided detailed diagrams and sketches to indicate the intense moments she wished to be captured on camera. By creating such pre-determined scenarios, which she referred to as constat d’action [event proof], Pane elevated the status of the photographic object beyond mere documentation. With the resulting constat, one can examine the undulating rhythm of images and the subtle shifts in narrative but also Pane’s long-lasting desire to ignite within us a curiosity as to the meaning of our existence.
At the heart of the exhibition is Pane’s 1974 work, Action Psyché, perhaps the most visionary and intense of all of her actions. The consant presented here is considered to be the most definitive manifestation of the work in terms of both its size and scale, incorporating 25 unique colour photographs, preparatory drawings and ephemera preserved in a metal case. Further highlights include Pane’s landscape actions, which reference her earlier career as a painter of colourful, hard-edge abstractions that eventually morphed into outdoor sculptures. From the late 1960s Pane began documenting her activities in natural settings, which generally involved gestures to mark and imprint the land with her body, stones or blocks of wood. Pane combined the images into storyboard-like montages that charted temporal progress but also more importantly implied the presence (and absence) of the human hand. Whilst formally quite simple, the works incorporate sophisticated elements of scale, space and repetition.

Continue Reading..

09
Mag

Jannis Kounellis

Jannis Kounellis, curated by Germano Celant, is the major retrospective dedicated to the artist following his death in 2017. Developed in collaboration with Archivio Kounellis, the project brings together more 70 works from 1958 to 2016, from both Italian and international museums, as well as from important private collections both in Italy and abroad. The show explores the artistic and exhibition history of Jannis Kounellis (Piraeus 1936–Rome 2017), establishing a dialogue between his works and the eighteenth-century spaces of Ca’ Corner della Regina.

The artist’s early works, originally exhibited between 1960 and 1966, deal with urban language. These paintings reproduce actual writings and signs from the streets of Rome. Later on, the artist transferred black letters, arrows and numbers onto white canvases, paper or other surfaces, in a language deconstruction that expresses a fragmentation of the real. From 1964 onward, Kounellis addressed subjects taken from nature, from sunsets to roses. In 1967 Kounellis’ investigation turned more radical, embracing concrete and natural elements including birds, soil, cacti, wool, coal, cotton, and fire.

Kounellis moved from a written and pictorial language to a physical and environmental one. Thus the use of organic and inorganic entities transformed his practice into corporeal experience, conceived as a sensorial transmission. In particular, the artist explored the sound dimension through which a painting is translated into sheet music to play or dance to. Already in 1960, Kounellis began chanting his letters on canvas, and in 1970 the artist included the presence of a musician or a dancer. An investigation into the olfactory, which began in 1969 with coffee, continued through the 1980s with elements like grappa, in order to escape the illusory limits of the painting and join with the virtual chaos of reality.In the installations realized toward the end of the 1960s, the artist sets up a dialectic battle between the lightness, instability and temporal nature connected with the fragility of the organic element and the heaviness, permanence, artificiality and rigidity of industrial structures, represented by modular surfaces in gray-painted metal. In the same period Kounellis participated in exhibitions that paved the way to Arte Povera, which in turn translated into an authentic form of visual expression. An approach that recalls ancient culture, interpreted according to a contemporary spirit, in contrast with the loss of historical and social identity that took place during the postwar period. Beginning in 1967, the year of the so-called “fire daisy,” the phenomenon of combustion began to appear frequently in the artist’s work: a “fire writing” that enlights the transformative and regenerative potential of flames. At the height of the mutation, according to alchemical tradition, we find gold, employed by the artist in multiple ways. In the installation Untitled (Tragedia civile) (1975), the contrast between the gold leaf that covers a bare wall and the black clothing hanging on a coat hanger underlines the dramatic nature of a scene that alludes to a personal and historical crisis. In Kounellis’ work smoke, naturally connected with fire, functions both as a residual of a pictorial process, and as proof of the passage of time. The traces of soot on stones, canvases and walls that characterize some of his works from 1979 and 1980 indicate a personal “return to painting,” in opposition to the anti-ideological and hedonistic approach employed in a large part of the painting production in the 1980s. Throughout his artistic research Kounellis develops a tragic and personal relationship with culture and history, avoiding a refined and reverential attitude. He would eventually represent the past with an incomplete collection of fragments of classical statues, as in the work from 1974. Meanwhile, in other works the Greco-Roman heritage is explored through the mask, as in the 1973 installation made up of a wooden frame on which plaster casts of faces are placed. The door is another symbol of the artist’s intolerance for the dynamics of his present. The passageways between rooms are closed up with stones, wood, sewing machines and iron reinforcing bars, making several spaces inaccessible in order to emphasize their unknown, metaphysical and surreal dimension.Continue Reading..

30
Apr

Lygia Pape

Fondazione Carriero presents Lygia Pape, curated by Francesco Stocchi, the first solo exhibition ever held in an Italian institution on one of the leading figures of Neoconcretism in Brazil, organized in close collaboration with Estate Projeto Lygia Pape

Fifteen years after the death of Lygia Pape (Rio de Janeiro, 1927-2004), Fondazione Carriero sets out to narrate and explore the career of the Brazilian artist, emphasizing her eclectic, versatile approach. Across a career spanning over half a century, Pape came to grips with multiple languages—from drawing to sculpture, video to dance and poetry, ranging into installation and photography— absorbing the experiences of European modernism and blending them with the cultural tenets of her country, generating a very personal synthesis of artistic practices. Inserted in the architecture of the Foundation, the exhibition represents a true voyage in the artist’s world, organized in different spaces, each of which delves into one specific aspect of her work, through the presentation of nuclei of pieces from 1952 to 2000. The exhibition provides an opportunity for knowledge, analysis and investigation of an artist whose practice embodies some of the key areas of research of Post-War. 

The exhibition Lygia Pape offers visitors a chance to approach the artist’s output and to observe it from multiple vantage points, starting from analysis of her research, a synthesis of invention and contamination from which color, intuition and sensuality emerge. Full and empty, interior and exterior, presence and absence coexist, conveying Pape’s figure and continuous experimentation, sustained by an ability to combine materials and techniques through the use of unconventional modes and languages of expression. Seen as a whole, her research reveals the way each new project develops as a natural evolution of those that preceded it. These connections are highlighted in the display of the works, spreading through the three floors of the Foundation and linked together by a common root, a leitmotif that originates in observation of nature and develops in a maximum formal tension using a reduced vocabulary.
The works on view include Livro Noite e Dia and Livro da Criação, books seen as objects with which to establish a relationship, condensations of mental and sensory experiences. The Tecelares, a series of engravings on wood, combine the Brazilian folk tradition with the Constructivist research of European origin. The exhibition also features Tteia1, the distinguished installation that embodies Lygia Pape’s investigation of materials, the third dimension and the constant drive towards reinvention and reinterpretation of her language.
 Today her work offers interesting tools for the interpretation of the issues of our present, in an approach based less on rules and more on spontaneity, applied by the artist has a key for deconstructing the standards and schemes of preconceptions. 

About Fondazione Carriero
Fondazione Carriero opened to the public in 2015, thanks to the great passion of its founder for art and his desire to share this passion with the public. It is a non-profit institution that joins research activities to commissioning new works for solo, and group exhibitions.

With the creation of a free venue open to everyone, the Foundation aims to promote, enhance, and spread modern and contemporary art and culture, acting as a cultural center in collaboration with the most acclaimed and innovative contemporary artists while also drawing attention to new artists or those from the past who deserve to be reconsidered. From a perspective that joins rediscovery and experimentation, investigations into any form of intellectual expression are joined with commissioning new works.

Lygia Pape
March 28–July 21, 2019 

Fondazione Carriero
Via Cino del Duca 4 
20122 Milan 
Italy 
Hours: Monday–Saturday 11am–6pm H

Contact
T +39 02 3674 7039 
info@fondazionecarriero.org
press@fondazionecarriero.org

18
Apr

Latifa Echakhch – Romance

Fondazione Memmo presenta, da venerdì 3 maggio, Romance, personale dell’artista franco-marocchina Latifa Echakhch, a cura di Francesco Stocchi.

Romance nasce dall’invito rivolto dalla Fondazione Memmo a Latifa Echakhch, per la realizzazione di un progetto inedito a partire dalle suggestioni derivanti dal suo incontro con il paesaggio, le atmosfere, la storia e le vicende socio-culturali di Roma.

La mostra trae origine da un processo di avvicinamento graduale che ha portato l’artista a scoprire, interiorizzare e tradurre gli stimoli raccolti nel corso delle sue visite.

Il titolo della mostra, Romance, riassume lo spirito dell’intervento di Latifa Echakhch volto a rappresentare la stratificazione architettonica, culturale e geologica della città, in cui si intrecciano differenti periodi storici e si mescolano molteplici linguaggi e registri espressivi. L’artista è interessata a esprimere questo sentimento di trasporto, di indagine e sorpresa attraverso un’istallazione realizzata negli spazi della Fondazione Memmo (le antiche scuderie di Palazzo Ruspoli): un’opera immersiva, inedita che richiama – sia concettualmente, sia per la tecnica realizzativa – i “capricci” architettonici in materiale cementizio che ornano i giardini di fine Ottocento.

Questa mostra segna una ulteriore tappa del percorso attraverso cui la Fondazione Memmo intende promuovere l’incontro di artisti internazionali con il tessuto produttivo e artigianale della città di Roma attraverso la produzione di progetti espositivi che rivisitino materiali e tecniche tradizionali.

Latifa Echakhch _ Romance
A cura di Francesco Stocchi
Anteprima stampa: 2 maggio 2019, ore 11.30
Vernissage: 2 maggio 2019, ore 18.00
Dal 3 maggio al 27 ottobre 2019

Orario: tutti i giorni dalle 11.00 alle 18.00 (martedì chiuso)
Ingresso libero

CONTATTI PER LA STAMPA
PCM Studio
Via Farini, 70 | 20159 Milano
www.paolamanfredi.com

08
Apr

ROMAMOR di Anne et Patrick Poirier

A Villa Medici fino al 5 maggio 2019 è possibile visitare la prima mostra monografica di Anne e Patrick Poirier in Italia, ROMAMOR. A cura di Chiara Parisi, la mostra chiude l’ambizioso programma espositivo ideata da Muriel Mayette-Holtz – direttrice dal 2015 al 2018 – che ha visto alternarsi grandi nomi dal 2017, tra cui Annette Messager, Yoko Ono e Claire Tabouret, Elizabeth Peyton e Camille Claudel, Tatiana Trouvé e Katharina Grosse, senza dimenticare i numerosi artisti internazionali che hanno partecipato alla mostra nei giardini, Ouvert la Nuit. A questi progetti si sono affiancate le due grandi mostre dedicate ai pensionnaires, al crocevia tra ricerca e produzione, Swimming is Saving e Take Me (I’m yours).

Anne e Patrick Poirier sono tra le coppie francesi più celebri della scena artistica internazionale: una simbiosi creativa che ha preso corpo proprio a Villa Medici, cinquanta anni fa. Il trascorrere del tempo, le tracce e le cicatrici del suo passaggio, la fragilità delle costruzioni umane e la potenza delle rovine, antiche come contemporanee, sono la fonte cui attinge la loro creatività, assumendo le sembianze d’una archeologia permeata di malinconia e di gioco. Anne è nata nel 1941 a Marsiglia; Patrick nel 1942 a Nantes. Il loro lavoro è caratterizzato dall’impronta di violenza lasciata dall’epoca che hanno vissuto – loro che, sin dalla più tenera infanzia, si sono confrontati con la guerra e con i suoi paesaggi devastati. Nel 1943, Anne assiste ai bombardamenti del porto di Marsiglia, e Patrick perde suo padre durante la distruzione del centro storico di Nantes.

Vincitori del Grand Prix de Rome nel 1967, dopo aver frequentato l’École des arts décoratifs di Parigi, Anne e Patrick soggiornano a Villa Medici dal 1968 al 1972 – invitati da Balthus. Ed è proprio a Villa Medici che decidono di unire la loro visione artistica, firmando congiuntamente i lavori. Anne e Patrick Poirier appartengono a quella generazione di artisti che, viaggiando e aprendosi al mondo fin dagli anni Sessanta, sviluppa una fascinazione per le città e le civiltà antiche e, in particolare, i processi della loro scomparsa. In linea con questa sensibilità: città misteriose, ricostruzioni archeologiche immaginarie, fascino delle rovine, indagine di giardini, unione di opere storiche e produzioni in situ, sono gli elementi che danno vita alla mostra ROMAMOR a Villa Medici. La loro prima grande opera comune (1969), un plastico in terracotta di Ostia Antica, nasce dal ricordo delle varie peregrinazioni nell’antico porto romano, eletta dagli artisti terreno di scavi per eccellenza. Da allora, il proposito di ritrovare le tracce di una storia remota, li condurrà spesso a esperire l’assenza, la perdita delle architetture, dei segni e dell’eredità delle civiltà.

“Passiamo dall’ombra alla luce, alternativamente, dal nero al bianco, dall’ordine al caos, dalla rovina alla costruzione utopica, dal passato al futuro, e dalla introspezione alla proiezione. La duplice identità del nostro binomio di architetti-archeologi è ciò che consente questa erranza tra universi apparentemente lontani tra loro, dei quali cerchiamo le relazioni nascoste”, secondo le parole degli artisti. A Villa Medici, la mostra si apre con una La Palissade/Scavi in corso (2019) che conduce lo spettatore nello spazio della Cisterna offrendogli la visione di una monumentale maquette di rovine, Finis Terrae (2019) illuminate da una scritta Un monde qui se fait sauter lui-même ne permet plus qu’on lui fasse le portrait (2001). Permeato da queste prime visioni, lo spettatore entra nella prima sala con la presenza magica di una scultura luminosa, Le monde à l’envers (2019), costruita a partire di un globo terrestre e costellazioni, che confluisce in un autoritratto degli artisti sotto forma di Giano Bifronte, dio dell’inizio e della fine, rivolto al futuro sempre con un occhio al passato. Un’opera ambivalente, manifesto della mostra, da leggere come contrappunto all’arazzo Palmyre (2018), sulla devastazione del sito siriano da parte dell’Isis nel 2015. Lo spettatore prosegue trovando, al centro della sala successiva, L’incendie de la grande bibliothèque (1976), opera fondamentale degli artisti, realizzata a carbone, metafora architettonica della memoria, della mente umana e del suo funzionamento. A metà tra catastrofe e utopia, tra storia e mito, quest’opera pone lo spettatore di fronte al senso di fragilità caratteristico delle opere di Anne e Patrick Poirier. Ouranopolis (1995), ovvero la “città celeste”, occupa la sala successiva. “Dall’esterno, quasi nulla si vede”: sospesa al soffitto, la scultura consente di intravedere attraverso minuscoli fori, uno spazio interno che conta quaranta sale. Anne e Patrick parlano dell’amore che nutrono per le biblioteche, intese come metafore della memoria; un’attrazione che li conduce a creare dei musei-biblioteche ideali, in questo caso un edificio ellittico che sembra poter volare verso nuovi mondi, trasportando lontano il suo carico di immagini di fronte a una possibile catastrofe imminente. Lo spazio onirico che lo spettatore intravede dagli oblò si sviluppa, lungo la grande scalinata delle antiche scuderie di Villa Medici, catapultandolo all’interno di una “irrealtà inquietante”. Uno spazio luminoso, Le songe de Jacob (2019), composto da nomi di costellazioni, scale fosforescenti, forme serpentine sospese, piume bianche sparse sulla scalinata accompagnano il passo dello spettatore, gradino dopo gradino, sino a raggiungere lo spazio successivo, di immacolato candore, dove appare Rétrovisions(2018), autoritratto tridimensionale della coppia che si riflette in uno specchio, circondata da parole al neon che parlando di utopia, illuminano lo spazio, abbagliandoci. Poco lontano, Surprise Party (1996): un mappamondo sgonfio e sbiadito poggiato su un vecchio giradischi crepitante, a sua volta posato su una vecchia valigia – altro elemento chiave del vocabolario dei Poirier – che evoca una geografia nomade, “un mondo che gira al contrario. Una terra che stride”. Tra vertigini e vestigia, lo spettatore si trova di fronte a Dépôt de mémoire et d’oubli(1989): una croce che svetta, fatta di impronte lasciate sulla carta di maschere di dei antichi. Con l’opera Lost Archetypes (1979), lo sguardo si trova davanti alla ricostruzione in scala umana di grandi opere architettoniche: una serie di quattro plastici bianchi di siti in rovina. Tra passato, presente e futuro, caduta, costruzione ed elevazione, Anne e Patrick Poirier fanno vacillare i punti di riferimento storici del pubblico romano. Nella sala successiva, i collages: disegni vegetali fissati nella cera, Journal d’Ouranopolis (1995), un tentativo di lottare contro la privazione della memoria e dell’oblio. La sensazione di vulnerabilità, che presiede alla distruzione del nostro mondo, si ritrova nelle immagini di Fragility e Ruins (1996). La mostra si estende al giardino di Villa Medici: nel Piazzale, gli artisti disegnano con delle pietre di marmo di Carrara, la forma di un cervello umano, Le Labyrinthe du Cerveau (2019), con i suoi due emisferi. Un “manifesto autobiografico bicefalo”, che raffigura la congiunzione delle loro menti, metafora di una pratica di coppia che rievoca la tematica da loro esplorata negli ultimi cinquant’anni: i meccanismi legati al passare del tempo. Le loro costruzioni sono come grandi cervelli, paesaggio che bisogna percorrere. Amano dire, a questo proposito: “L’immagine del cervello, fatto di due emisferi, è ciò che meglio può rappresentarci; rappresentare contemporaneamente l’unità e la diversità della simbiosi che siamo”. Il visitatore continua la sua passeggiata immaginando di prendere una pausa nella monumentale sedia in granito, Siège Mesopotamia (2012-15) che troneggia nel giardino. Poco lontano, nella Fontana dell’obelisco, si intravede Regard des Statues (2019): anonimi occhi in gesso ci appaiono deformati dall’acqua in cui sono immersi. L’occhio che guarda il cielo, il tempo, l’occhio del ricordo e dell’oblio, l’occhio della storia e della violenza, conduce lo spettatore all’Atelier Balthus, dove emerge un’opera mitica, realizzata proprio a Villa Medici nel 1971: stele di carta, costruite a partire dai calchi delle Erme – le figure in marmo che costellano i viali del giardino della Villa – accompagnate da libri-erbari, “quaderni che recano annotazioni personali e disegni”, e medaglioni di porcellana su cui sono raffigurate le stesse immagini funebri. La parola che dà nome alla mostra, ROMAMOR (2019), appare in neon nel portico dell’Atelier Balthus in omaggio a questa città così importante da un punto di vista artistico e umano per i due artisti.Continue Reading..

08
Apr

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso

L’artista belga di fama mondiale Jan Fabre torna a Napoli con un nuovo progetto che coinvolge quattro luoghi di grande prestigio: il Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, la chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, il Museo Madre e la galleria Studio Trisorio.

Al Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, l’artista esporrà un gruppo di lavori in dialogo con una selezione speciale di opere d’arte provenienti dalla collezione permanente del museo e da altre istituzioni museali napoletane.  La mostra, dal titolo Oro Rosso. Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue, curata da Stefano Causa insieme a Blandine Gwizdala, inaugurerà il 30 marzo e vedrà sculture in oro e disegni di sangue creati dall’artista dagli anni Settanta ad oggi, oltre a una serie inedita e sorprendente di sculture in corallo rosso, realizzata appositamente per Capodimonte.

Le opere di Fabre si porranno in dialogo con alcuni capolavori pittorici e splendidi oggetti d’arte decorativa di epoca rinascimentale, manierista e barocca selezionati Stefano Causa; come dice lo stesso curatore: “Fabre racconta, in una lingua non troppo diversa, una vicenda di metamorfosi incessanti; di materiali che mutano destinazione e funzione; una storia di sangue e umori corporali, inganni e trappole del senso; pietre preziose, coralli e scarabei, usciti a pioggia dai residuati di una tomba egizia, frammenti di armature, sequenze di numeri e citazioni dalle Scritture, dentro un universo centrifugo di segni…che, talvolta, diventa un sottobosco nel quale calarsi con i pennellini di uno specialista fiammingo di nature morte”.
In mostra, le sculture dorate di Jan Fabre danno corpo prezioso alle idee dell’artista sulla creazione, sull’arte e sul suo rapporto con i grandi maestri del passato. Nei disegni di sangue si ritrovano invece le più profonde motivazioni dell’artista, le sue sperimentazioni, il suo manifesto poetico, fisico, intimo.
“Il sangue oggi è oro” – dice Jan Fabre – e nell’esposizione al Museo di Capodimonte l’artista mette in scena un intero universo di simboli che parlano d’arte e di bellezza, di forza e fragilità del genere umano, del ciclo continuo di vita-morte-rinascita.
Il corallo è stato chiamato “oro rosso”, per la sua preziosità e per la sua valenza apotropaica. Come scrive la critica d’arte Melania Rossi sul catalogo della mostra edito da Electa: “Le dieci nuove sculture di corallo rosso che il maestro belga ha creato per la sua mostra personale al museo di Capodimonte sembrano un tesoro proveniente dagli abissi della mente dell’artista. Concrezioni che fanno pensare a fantasiose barriere coralline assumono alcune tra le forme più care a Fabre: teschi, cuori anatomici, croci, spade e pugnali. A loro volta, poi, costellati d’immagini e segni che alludono ad altri significati e ad altre storie, in un ciclo continuo di connessioni fino a creare antichi ibridi tra natura e simbolo, nuovi idoli tra passato e futuro”.
Sempre dal 30 marzo, a cura di Melania Rossi, la scultura di Jan Fabre The man who bears the cross (L’uomo che sorregge la croce)(2015), sarà visibile nella chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, in dialogo diretto con il capolavoro di Caravaggio Sette opere di Misericordia (1606-1607).
La scultura, realizzata completamente in cera, è un autoritratto dell’artista, basato sui tratti somatici dello zio Jaak Fabre, che tiene in bilico una croce di oltre due metri sul palmo della mano. Nel rituale auto-rappresentativo l’artista esce da sé stesso e diviene qualunque uomo, lo specchio di ognuno di noi. Scrive la curatrice: “L’uomo che sorregge la croce (2015) è la rappresentazione dell’interrogarsi, è la celebrazione del dubbio, e con la sua collocazione all’interno del Pio Monte della Misericordia sembra aggiungere un’ottava Opera di Misericordia: confortare chi dubita. Nel dipinto di Caravaggio, il bello e il vero coincidono mirabilmente e la sua opera è un incredibile intreccio di luce e buio in cui la volontà di rappresentare la verità dell’essere umano del 1600 trova piena soddisfazione. Tutta la ricerca di Jan Fabre, artista del nostro tempo, va nella stessa direzione; il ciclo vita-morte-rinascita è centrale nel suo pensiero in cui religione e scienza, simbolo e corpo si compenetrano in un vortice geniale di immagini e azioni”. Il confronto tra il linguaggio seicentesco di Caravaggio e quello contemporaneo fiammingo di Fabre accenderà nuove riflessioni, segnando un ideale e virtuoso passaggio di testimone tra passato e presente artistici.

Dal 30 marzo, inoltre, il Museo Madre, a cura di Andrea VilianiMelania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, ospiterà in anteprima l’iconica sculturaL’uomo che misura le nuvole (2018), in un’inedita versione in marmo di Carrara allestita nel Cortile d’onore del museo regionale d’arte contemporanea.
Dopo la presentazione nel 2008 e nel 2017 della versione in bronzo della stessa scultura in Piazza del Plebiscito e sul terrazzo del museo, Jan Fabre torna a celebrare al Madre la capacità di immaginare, sognare e conoscere, elevandosi oltre il nostro destino di esseri umani. L’uomo che misura le nuvole si ispira dall’affermazione che l’ornitologo Robert Stroud pronunciò nel momento della liberazione dalla prigione di Alcatraz, quando dichiarò che si sarebbe d’ora in poi dedicato appunto a “misurare le nuvole”. Come artista e ricercatore, Fabre tenta costantemente, in effetti, di misurare le nuvole, ovvero di dichiarare con la sua opera che se la tensione verso il sapere ha limiti invalicabili è però possibile esprimere l’inesprimibile attraverso la ricerca artistica, e dare quindi rappresentazione all’intrinseca e fondativa bellezza umana e universale.

Presso la storica galleria Studio Trisorio, sarà esposta una selezione di opere di Jan Fabre realizzate completamente con di gusci di scarabei iridescenti.
La mostra, dal titolo Tribute to Hieronymus Bosch in Congo (Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo), a cura di Melania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, inaugurerà il 29 marzo e vedrà dei grandi pannelli e delle sculture a mosaico di scarabei ispirati alla triste e violenta storia della colonizzazione del Congo belga. In queste opere, l’ispirazione storica si unisce alla simbologia medioevale tratta da uno dei più grandi maestri fiamminghi, uno dei maestri putativi di Jan Fabre, Hieronymus Bosch, e in particolare dal suo capolavoro Il Giardino delle Delizie (1480-1490).
L’inferno di Bosch, ammirato per la sua spiccata inventiva, per molti aspetti divenne una realtà raccapricciante nel Congo Belga. L’opera d’arte è proprio questa combinazione unica di forma e contenuto. L’artista ci porta in una zona indefinita, tra il Paradiso e il Congo Belga, in un’illusione di libertà, in un luogo lontano, sia mitico che concreto, attraverso una polisemia di immagini dell’esistenza umana.

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso
Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue.
Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
Via Miano 2, Napoli
30 marzo – 15 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che sorregge la croce.
Pio Monte della Misericordia
Via dei Tribunali 253, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo.

Studio Trisorio
Riviera di Chiaia 215, Napoli
29 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che misura le nuvole
Museo Madre
Via Luigi Settembrini 79, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

NAPOLI: Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte e altre sedi
Dal 29 Marzo 2019 al 30 Settembre 2019
Ente promotore: MiBAC – Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
T.+39 081 7499111
mu-cap@beniculturali.it

Immagine: Jan Fabre, Golden Human Brain with Angel Wings, 2011. Nero Assoluto / bronzo silicato, oro 24 carati, granito Nero Assoluto, 28×30,5×26 cm