Category: pittura

20
Nov

Urs Fischer. Leo

An artwork is not about the now.
—Urs Fischer

Gagosian is pleased to present Leo, an exhibition of new work by Urs Fischer.
Across his protean oeuvre, Fischer frequently evokes art historical genres and motifs with wry self-awareness and humor. In Fischer’s work, the processes of material creation and destruction are often explored through the use of impermanent materials, as in Bread House (2004–05), a life-size cabin constructed from loaves of sourdough bread. Embracing transformation and decay while resounding with poetic contradictions, Fischer’s art excavates the potential of its materials and media, producing joyful disorientation and sinister bewilderment.

Fischer’s candle sculptures exemplify the relationship between permanence and impermanence. He began to make them in the early 2000s with a series of crudely rendered female nudes, standing upright or lounging in groups. A series of realistic figurative candle portraits followed, including a full-size replica of Giambologna’s sixteenth-century sculpture The Rape of the Sabine Women, and Marsupiale (Fabrizio) (2017), which amalgamates a portrait of the Florentine antique dealer Fabrizio Moretti with an oversize bust of Saint Leonard, the patron saint of prisoners. In 2018, Fischer created a candle replica of the art patron and collector Dasha Zhukova, which burned for weeks in the shopfront gallery at Gagosian Davies Street in London.

Fischer’s newest candle portrait, Leo (George & Irmelin) (2019), depicts Leonardo DiCaprio with his parents, George DiCaprio and Irmelin Indenbirken. Cast entirely in wax, the family is posed in mid-action: George gestures while conversing with Leo, as Irmelin holds Leo in her loving embrace.

As with all of Fischer’s candle sculptures, Leo (George & Irmelin) will melt slowly over the course of the exhibition, its original composition transmuted into a form dictated by the wayward laws of physics. Captivating in their materiality and haunting in their implications, Fischer’s candles serve as both portraits of—and meditations on—the passing of time. Elaborating on traditions of memento mori, they remind viewers of the transience of life, beauty, and even art itself.

Leo is presented in the ground floor gallery of Gagosian Paris. On view upstairs in the Project Space is Smalls, an exhibition of new works by Spencer Sweeney.

Urs Fischer. Leo
October 14–December 20, 2019

Gagosian
4 rue de Ponthieu
75008 Paris

+33 1 75 00 05 92
paris@gagosian.com

Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 11–7

Contact
collecting@gagosian.com
press@gagosian.com

Image: Urs Fischer Gentle Moon, 2019 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, solvent-based screen printing ink 96 x 72 in 243.8 x 182.9 cm © Urs Fischer. Photo- Ulrich Ghezzi. Courtesy Gagosian
28
Ott

Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection

The Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden has announced a two-part exhibition on the life and legacy of Marcel Duchamp, commencing with “Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection” on view Nov. 9–Oct. 12, 2020. This first part of the exhibition will feature the recent gift of over 50 major historical artworks, including more than 35 seminal works by Duchamp, promised to the museum by Washington, D.C., collectors Barbara and Aaron Levine. The second stage of the exhibition, on view April 18, 2020–Oct. 12, 2020, will examine Duchamp’s lasting impact through the lens of the Hirshhorn’s permanent collection, including significant works by a diverse roster of modern and contemporary artists. Both exhibitions are organized by Evelyn Hankins, the Hirshhorn’s senior curator, and accompanied by a 224-page publication.

“The Levines’ gift is transformative for the Hirshhorn, and because of their generosity we are able to present the works of one of the most significant artists of the 20th century, whose influence is still felt by artists working today,” said Hirshhorn Director Melissa Chiu. “Through this exhibition, museum visitors will observe firsthand the evolution of Duchamp’s creative output alongside examples of artworks by his peers and artists of subsequent generations.”

“Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection” comprises an unparalleled selection of artworks, thoughtfully acquired over the course of two decades and offering a rarely seen view of the entire arc of Duchamp’s career. The exhibition will include a number of Duchamp’s most famous readymades, including “Hat Rack,” “Comb,” “Apolinère Enameled,” “With Hidden Noise,” “L.H.O.O.Q.” and “Why Not Sneeze?,” which together embody Duchamp’s then-radical idea that an artist’s ideas are more important than craft or aesthetics. Also prominently featured will be a number of Duchamp’s unique drawings and prints related to his magnum opus, “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass),” including “Pendu Femelle,” “Studies for the Bachelors in the Cemetery of Uniforms and Liveries, No. 2,” “Bride” and “Nine Malic Moulds.” Further insight into his unique working process is revealed by “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Green Box)” and “In the Infinitive (The White Box),” which contain more than 150 facsimiles of Duchamp’s working notes for “The Large Glass.” His forward-thinking mindset can be seen in his later kinetic works, such as the “Rotoreliefs (Optical Disks)” and “Cover of S.M.S. (Esquivons les ecchymoses des esquimaux aux mots exquis),” which demonstrate the artist’s interest in creating works that call upon the brain to enhance, instead of merely process, the information received by the eye, deftly anticipating future experiments in film and Op art. The exhibition will also include portraits of Duchamp, as well as works by his contemporaries and those he influenced, including Man Ray, Tristan Tzara, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Diane Arbus and Irving Penn, among others. An educational resource room for visitors of all ages will be included at the end of the exhibition, featuring books about Duchamp and his practice and hands-on making activities inspired by the artist’s work. An interactive chess table will also be included at the end of the exhibition—a nod to one of the artist’s favorite pastimes.

The second exhibition focuses on the extraordinary legacy of Duchamp by examining works from the Hirshhorn’s permanent collection that touch upon a number of broad themes pivotal to the artist’s practice. The exhibition will begin by introducing artwork created by Duchamp’s friends and contemporaries, many of whom explored similar ideas, often challenging traditional artistic mediums to create work that questioned the conventional ideas of fine art. Other issues investigated in the work of artists like Joseph Kosuth and Robert Rauschenberg include optics and light, language, the reuse and reproduction of existing images, the use of everyday objects, the artist’s commitment to self-representation and his belief that an artwork’s meaning is inherently dependent on the viewer.

The promised gift will establish the Hirshhorn as a preeminent Duchamp resource in the mid-Atlantic region, offering one of the most significant public collections in the United States alongside those of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. Together the paired exhibitions, which demonstrate not only Duchamp’s incredible impact on art, but also the ways in which his revolutionary practice transformed people’s understanding of what an artwork can be, will give viewers a full awareness of the artist’s inimitable significance.Continue Reading..

10
Ott

Musja. The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?

Christian Boltanski, Monica Bonvicini, Monster Chetwynd, Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Sheela Gowda, James Lee Byars, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Gregor Schneider, Chiharu Shiota

Curated by Danilo Eccher

Musja, the exhibition space in via dei Chiavari 7 in Rome presided over by Ovidio Jacorossi, becomes a private museum with the opening on October 9 of Who is afraid of the Dark?, the first exhibition within The Dark Side project, a three year programme curated by Danilo Eccher.

The vast art collection owned by Jacorossi, covering the period from the early 19th century Italian to the present, will be flanked by the most innovative contemporary trends in the international panorama in order to highlight the fundamental contribution of art to personal and collective growth. The new museum also sets out to become established as a focus for the development of civil society in Rome, and to carry forward cultural commitment, and dialogue with international public and private institutions and museums.

The complex thematic setting of The Dark Side project is organized into three exhibitions spread over three years, and dedicated to: “Fear of the Dark,” “Fear of Solitude,” and “Fear of Time.” The first event in the new exhibition programme—“Fear of the Dark”—brings together 13 of the most important international artists with large site-specific installations and large-scale artworks by established artists, such as Gregor Schneider, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Christian Boltanski, James Lee Byars as well as new protagonists on the contemporary art scene such as Monster Chetwynd, Sheela Gowda, and Chiharu Shiota. There is a substantial Italian component with works and installations by Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Monica Bonvicini. During the opening of the exhibition, and thereafter at monthly intervals, there will be a performance by “Differenziale Femminile,” a group of four actresses, in the rooms of the gallery.

The majority of the site-specific works will be produced especially for the exhibition, while others are loans from various institutions, galleries and some others are part of the Jacorossi collection. All of them were selected for their power to draw the viewer in and encourage reflection on the topic while, at the same time, introducing some essential aspects of current contemporary art research. Visitors will be able to analyse their own reactions to sensory and tactile experiences, theatrical and magical visions, rituals and settings, anxieties that take different and unexpected forms only to melt away.

The catalogue accompanying the exhibition, published by Silvana Editoriale, contains a wealth of images by all the participating artists as well as written contributions. In addition to Danilo Eccher’s contribution, there are also some intellectually complex views on the theme of the dark by theologian Gianfranco Ravasi, theoretical physicist Mario Rasetti, psychiatrist Eugenio Borgna and philosopher Federico Vercellone. Different points of view, cross-cutting approaches, intellectual fields that diverge, overlap and are interwoven, give the project much greater scope than a standard art exhibition.

In the course of the exhibition, Musja will also be holding a series of meetings on the theme, coordinated by Federico Vercellone, professor of Aesthetics in the Department of Philosophy at Turin University.

The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?
October 9, 2019–March 1, 2020

Musja
via dei Chiavari 7
Rome
Italy

Image artwork by Gino De Dominicis, Jacorossi collection

25
Giu

Arianna Matta – Romanticismo digitale

L’artista romana Arianna Matta è la protagonista della terza mostra nel calendario degli eventi della galleria Orizzonti Arte Contemporanea di Ostuni. Con la personale Romanticismo digitale l’artista propone una selezione di dipinti di grandi dimensioni puntando l’attenzione sul flusso del tempo, liquido, interrotto e sospeso che attraversa luoghi fermi ma vibranti, proiezione di immagini interiori.

L’artista stessa ci parla del suo lavoro, raccontandoci quanto il trascorrere del tempo, il passato inteso come radici, siano elementi fondamentali nel suo lavoro.

“Il tempo è per me un fattore determinate, difficile se non impossibile fissarne la memoria. Noi siamo la nostra memoria, noi siamo questo museo chimerico di forme incostanti, questo mucchio di specchi rotti – scriveva Borges – autore che amo molto e, in un certo senso, la mia pittura traduce in immagini tali parole. Anche se l’incertezza di un tempo o di uno spazio credo sia connaturata all’esistenza stessa, ogni azione umana si nutre dell’illusoria volontà del superamento della stessa. Infatti la pittura è la mia illusione, il mio prendere tempo, una specie di pacificata rassegnazione. Forse è un modo per fissare sulla tela la nostalgia attraverso una sorta di archeologia della memoria, non per testimoniare quello che è stato, ma per vivere, per andare avanti. Ricostruiamo noi stessi attraverso un puzzle di ricordi, che plasmiamo di volta in volta, per come ci fa più comodo, per come dobbiamo o riusciamo a essere in un preciso momento. Pertanto, una certa tensione nostalgica e malinconica è presente nel mio fare pittura e non potrebbe essere altrimenti.

In riferimento a un onirismo liquido cosi definito e ravvisato nelle mie opere, alcuni amici mi fecero notare certe analogie tra il pensiero di Bauman, in merito appunto alla liquidità e il mio modo di dipingere. In realtà, non c’è un riferimento conscio e diretto, ma vivendo in questo tempo non posso che essere il frutto, oserei dire, l’anello debole, di questa vita liquida. Anello debole in quanto non mi ritengo una pittrice contemporanea, mi definirei ‘neoromantica digitale’, destinata in un certo senso a soccombere, se proprio vogliamo riferirci a Bauman. In questa vita liquida, o cambiamo pelle di continuo o siamo destinati a essere sopraffatti. Io ho deciso di tenere la mia pelle, di essere aderente a me stessa.

Ed è per questo che la mia ricerca pittorica si sviluppa intorno all’esigenza di una pittura intimista. Il gesto tecnico, nella mia visione dell’arte, è fortemente legato a quello concettuale; di conseguenza la mia, è una pittura gestuale, che si nutre dell’immediatezza delle emozioni. Non realizzo disegni preparatori o bozzetti, lascio che il movimento sia naturale e svincolato dalla forma, Il mio è un ’romanticismo digitale’, vale a dire un romanticismo che si nutre delle nuove tecnologie, sviluppandole in ‘analogico’. Tendo ad evocare spazi vissuti ed emozioni strizzando l’occhio alla glitch art, come se il richiamo al ’disturbo digitale’ fosse, ad oggi, il modo più naturale per raccontare le inquietudini quotidiane”.

Romanticismo Digitale
Opere di Arianna Matta

INAUGURAZIONE in galleria DOMENICA 30 GIUGNO 2019 dalle ore 11.00 in poi
dal 30 giugno al 14 luglio 2019

GALLERIA ORIZZONTI ARTE CONTEMPORANEA
Piazzetta Cattedrale (centro storico)
72017 Ostuni (Br)
Tel. 0831.335373 – Cell. 348.8032506
info@orizzontiarte.it
www.orizzontiarte.it
F: Orizzontiartecontemporanea

Communication Manager
Amalia Di Lanno
www.amaliadilanno.com
info@amaliadilanno.com

17
Giu

DORA MAAR in Paris

The largest French retrospective ever devoted to Dora Maar (1907-1997) invites you to discover all the facets of her work, through more than five hundred works and documents. Initially a professional photographer and surrealist before becoming a painter, Dora Maar is an artist of undeniable renown. Far beyond the image, to which she is all too often limited, of her intimate relationship with Picasso, this exhibition retraces the life of an accomplished artist and a free and independent intellectual.

The exhibition is organized by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, in coproduction with the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and in collaboration with the Tate Modern (London).

PRESENTATION BY THE CURATORS
“To Dora of the varied, always beautiful, faces”. Lise Deharme’s dedication to her friend Dora Maar in a copy of Cœur de Pic (1937) poetically sums up the various facets of her artistic career: between photographer and painter, between youthful Surrealist revolution and the existential introspection that marked her painting activity after World War II.

With the collaboration of the J. Paul Getty Museum and in partnership with the Tate Modern, the exhibition organized by the Centre Pompidou aims to highlight, for the first time in a French museum, Dora Maar’s work as an artist, and not only as the muse and mistress of the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. Although for many she remains the model of La femme qui pleure, Dora Maar has nevertheless recently enjoyed critical reception and recognition in studies dedicated to Surrealism and photography. Several exhibitions organized by the Musée National d’Art Moderne, “Explosante fixe” and, more recently, “La Subversion des images” and “Voici Paris”, accorded a special place to Dora Maar’s Surrealist work, with enigmatic photographs such as Portrait d’Ubu and Le Simulateur, a photomontage that joined the museum’s collections in 1973.
The donation of Simulateur was the beginning of the Centre Pompidou’s continued interest in Dora Maar’s photographic work. The 1980s and 1990s were marked by various acquisitions, culminating in 2011 with the arrival of ten prints from the Bouqueret collection. In 2004 the purchase of her studio collection, consisting of some one thousand eight hundred and ninety negatives and two hundred and eighty contact prints, made the collection preserved in the Musée National d’Art Moderne one of the largest public collections of Dora Maar’s work. The recent digitization of negatives has now rendered her work accessible to a large audience of researchers and amateurs. Dora Maar is the only artist with a large portfolio of photographs preserved in the collections – Brancusi, Brassaï, Éli Lotar, Man Ray – who has not yet been the subject of a major exhibition project. Thanks to original archives and close scientific collaboration between the curatorship teams at the Centre Pompidou and the Getty Museum, the Dora Maar retrospective traces the development of this independent artist through more than four hundred works and documents: from her first commissions for fashion and advertising as a studio photographer, to her political commitments as witnessed by her street photographs, including her Surrealist activity and her meeting with Picasso. Lastly, the exhibition shines a special spotlight on her work as a painter, an activity to which she devoted herself for nearly forty years. Like her fellow female photographers, Laure Albin Guillot, Rogi André, Nora Dumas and Germaine Krull, who were active like her between the wars, Dora Maar belongs to the generation of women who liberated themselves professionally and socially through their work as photographers, a profession that was undergoing complete renewal with the development of the illustrated press and advertising. After studying graphic art in the Comité des Dames of the Union des Arts Décoratifs, Dora Maar trained in photography in the late 1920s. Like her mentor, Emmanuel Sougez, she preferred to work in a studio and collaborated with Pierre Kéfer, a set designer for films, from 1931 to 1935. “Kéfer-Dora Maar” became the name and the official credit for the studio, figuring in prints and publications at the time, even when Dora Maar or Pierre Kéfer worked alone on projects. Kéfer’s social flair enabled them to specialise in portraits, fashion and advertising illustrations for the cosmetics sector. This exhibition accords a central position to Dora Maar, a professional photographer endowed with an inventiveness that combined great technical mastery with a dreamlike universe that was much praised by her contemporaries.Continue Reading..

13
Giu

Mark Rothko

The Kunsthistorisches Museum presents for the first time in Austria an exhibition dedicated to the great American artist, Mark Rothko. Together with his contemporaries, Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Rothko was one of the Abstract Expressionists, whose works made New York a centre of modern art. Rothko undertook three extensive trips to Europe, visiting as many churches, architectural monuments, and museums as he could. Art and architecture of the recent and more distant past are a vigorous presence in his work. Our exhibition presents an overview of Rothko’s artistic career from the early figurative works of the 1930s to those of the 1940s, and the classical abstract paintings of the 1950s and 1960s that made him famous.

Presenting a survey of his artistic career for the first time in Austria, the exhibition traces the radical development of Rothko’s work across more than four decades, from his early figurative paintings of the 1930s, through the transitional years of the 1940s to the groundbreaking mature works of the 1950s and 1960s. The artist’s children Kate and Christopher have been closely involved in the project from its very beginning, and have themselves kindly loaned a number of paintings from the family collection. Presented within the Kunsthistorisches Museum, whose historical collections span some 5,000 years of human creativity from Ancient Egypt to the Baroque, the exhibition provides a unique opportunity to examine Rothko’s deep and sustained interest in the art of the past. From his earliest visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York as a student in the 1920s, Rothko dedicated himself to the study of classical art, architecture and mythology, early Italian gold-ground painting, the Renaissance and the Dutch Golden Age. The exhibition will examine the direct influence of his voyages to Europe between 1950 and 1966, journeys based almost entirely around the viewing of churches, chapels and Old Master paintings in Venice, Rome, Florence, Siena, Arezzo, Tarquinia, Assisi, Spoleto, Paris, Chartres, Lascaux, Amsterdam, Brussels, Antwerp and London. It will explore the significance of specific places on the development of his mature work, from the frescoes of Fra Angelico in the convent of San Marco, Florence, the Baptistery of Santa Maria Assunta in Torcello, and the Villa of Mysteries in Pompeii, to the temples of Paestum and Michelangelo’s Laurentian Library in Florence.

Through major loans, including an entire gallery of large-scale Seagram Murals from the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., the exhibition will reveal how Rothko learnt from the techniques of the Old Masters, layering colour in the manner of Titian and developing in his mature work a sense of “inner light” similar to that of Rembrandt. When Rothko broke with tradition in the latter part of his life to create a radical new form of artistic expression, he did so with extensive knowledge and respect for what had come before. In the words of the late critic John Berger: “he did nothing else but look back in a way such as no painter before had ever done.” He was the most serious of artists, and addressed the most serious of subjects: the sacred, the spiritual, the tragic and the timeless. With unsparing intensity and a total commitment to risk, he created a form of human drama that continues to move and inspire artists, curators and the general public to this day.Continue Reading..

11
Giu

Claudia Margadonna – Natura Invisibile

Il secondo evento nel calendario stagionale della Orizzonti Arte Contemporanea di Ostuni è affidato all’artista milanese Claudia Margadonna che, reduce dalla grande esposizione presso le Filanda di Soncino, propone in galleria una selezione di dipinti di grandi dimensioni per la mostra Natura Invisibile.

L’artista ci parla del suo lavoro, raccontandoci quanto la natura sia fonte determinante di ispirazione nella sua opera:
“Il contatto con la natura genera in me un senso di appagamento e connessione col mondo. Dipingo in assenza di progettualità e le immagini che appaiono appartengono sempre al mondo naturale. Il mio modo di dipingere è erratico, procedo per divagazioni, seguendo il libero fluire della pennellata, come trasportata da una forza invisibile, alla scoperta di paesaggi naturali e immaginari. Mi muovo in uno stato di trasognamento, le immagini appaiono da sé, provenienti chissà da quale mondo interiore o arcano, semplicemente seguo questo flusso alla scoperta di nuovi elementi che mi si delineano dinanzi. Non rappresento in modo realistico la natura, ciò che mi interessa è evocare, cogliere e trasporre sulla tela le forze che muovono la natura stessa. L’opera è il frutto della connessione tra l’energia che permea l’esistenza ed il mio modo dinamico di dipingere. Riversando la mia gestualità nell’opera, anch’essa, di riflesso, mi restituisce le sue vibrazioni di colori, forme e materia. Si stabilisce così una forte connessione tra natura, vita e opera. Essendo per me imprescindibile il rapporto con il mondo naturale, il mio invito, anche in questa personale, è quello di riappropriarci di uno stile di vita che sia più in sintonia con la natura e teso alla sua salvaguardia”.

Natura Invisibile
Opere di Claudia Margadonna
INAUGURAZIONE in galleria DOMENICA 16 GIUGNO 2019 dalle ore 11.00 in poi
dal 16 al 29 giugno 2019

OrizzontiArteContemporanea
Piazzetta Cattedrale (centro storico)
72017 Ostuni (Br)
Tel. 0831.335373 – Cell. 348.8032506
info@orizzontiarte.it
F: Orizzontiartecontemporanea

Communication Manager
Amalia Di Lanno
info@amaliadilanno.com

09
Mag

Jannis Kounellis

Jannis Kounellis, curated by Germano Celant, is the major retrospective dedicated to the artist following his death in 2017. Developed in collaboration with Archivio Kounellis, the project brings together more 70 works from 1958 to 2016, from both Italian and international museums, as well as from important private collections both in Italy and abroad. The show explores the artistic and exhibition history of Jannis Kounellis (Piraeus 1936–Rome 2017), establishing a dialogue between his works and the eighteenth-century spaces of Ca’ Corner della Regina.

The artist’s early works, originally exhibited between 1960 and 1966, deal with urban language. These paintings reproduce actual writings and signs from the streets of Rome. Later on, the artist transferred black letters, arrows and numbers onto white canvases, paper or other surfaces, in a language deconstruction that expresses a fragmentation of the real. From 1964 onward, Kounellis addressed subjects taken from nature, from sunsets to roses. In 1967 Kounellis’ investigation turned more radical, embracing concrete and natural elements including birds, soil, cacti, wool, coal, cotton, and fire.

Kounellis moved from a written and pictorial language to a physical and environmental one. Thus the use of organic and inorganic entities transformed his practice into corporeal experience, conceived as a sensorial transmission. In particular, the artist explored the sound dimension through which a painting is translated into sheet music to play or dance to. Already in 1960, Kounellis began chanting his letters on canvas, and in 1970 the artist included the presence of a musician or a dancer. An investigation into the olfactory, which began in 1969 with coffee, continued through the 1980s with elements like grappa, in order to escape the illusory limits of the painting and join with the virtual chaos of reality.In the installations realized toward the end of the 1960s, the artist sets up a dialectic battle between the lightness, instability and temporal nature connected with the fragility of the organic element and the heaviness, permanence, artificiality and rigidity of industrial structures, represented by modular surfaces in gray-painted metal. In the same period Kounellis participated in exhibitions that paved the way to Arte Povera, which in turn translated into an authentic form of visual expression. An approach that recalls ancient culture, interpreted according to a contemporary spirit, in contrast with the loss of historical and social identity that took place during the postwar period. Beginning in 1967, the year of the so-called “fire daisy,” the phenomenon of combustion began to appear frequently in the artist’s work: a “fire writing” that enlights the transformative and regenerative potential of flames. At the height of the mutation, according to alchemical tradition, we find gold, employed by the artist in multiple ways. In the installation Untitled (Tragedia civile) (1975), the contrast between the gold leaf that covers a bare wall and the black clothing hanging on a coat hanger underlines the dramatic nature of a scene that alludes to a personal and historical crisis. In Kounellis’ work smoke, naturally connected with fire, functions both as a residual of a pictorial process, and as proof of the passage of time. The traces of soot on stones, canvases and walls that characterize some of his works from 1979 and 1980 indicate a personal “return to painting,” in opposition to the anti-ideological and hedonistic approach employed in a large part of the painting production in the 1980s. Throughout his artistic research Kounellis develops a tragic and personal relationship with culture and history, avoiding a refined and reverential attitude. He would eventually represent the past with an incomplete collection of fragments of classical statues, as in the work from 1974. Meanwhile, in other works the Greco-Roman heritage is explored through the mask, as in the 1973 installation made up of a wooden frame on which plaster casts of faces are placed. The door is another symbol of the artist’s intolerance for the dynamics of his present. The passageways between rooms are closed up with stones, wood, sewing machines and iron reinforcing bars, making several spaces inaccessible in order to emphasize their unknown, metaphysical and surreal dimension.Continue Reading..

08
Apr

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso

L’artista belga di fama mondiale Jan Fabre torna a Napoli con un nuovo progetto che coinvolge quattro luoghi di grande prestigio: il Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, la chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, il Museo Madre e la galleria Studio Trisorio.

Al Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, l’artista esporrà un gruppo di lavori in dialogo con una selezione speciale di opere d’arte provenienti dalla collezione permanente del museo e da altre istituzioni museali napoletane.  La mostra, dal titolo Oro Rosso. Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue, curata da Stefano Causa insieme a Blandine Gwizdala, inaugurerà il 30 marzo e vedrà sculture in oro e disegni di sangue creati dall’artista dagli anni Settanta ad oggi, oltre a una serie inedita e sorprendente di sculture in corallo rosso, realizzata appositamente per Capodimonte.

Le opere di Fabre si porranno in dialogo con alcuni capolavori pittorici e splendidi oggetti d’arte decorativa di epoca rinascimentale, manierista e barocca selezionati Stefano Causa; come dice lo stesso curatore: “Fabre racconta, in una lingua non troppo diversa, una vicenda di metamorfosi incessanti; di materiali che mutano destinazione e funzione; una storia di sangue e umori corporali, inganni e trappole del senso; pietre preziose, coralli e scarabei, usciti a pioggia dai residuati di una tomba egizia, frammenti di armature, sequenze di numeri e citazioni dalle Scritture, dentro un universo centrifugo di segni…che, talvolta, diventa un sottobosco nel quale calarsi con i pennellini di uno specialista fiammingo di nature morte”.
In mostra, le sculture dorate di Jan Fabre danno corpo prezioso alle idee dell’artista sulla creazione, sull’arte e sul suo rapporto con i grandi maestri del passato. Nei disegni di sangue si ritrovano invece le più profonde motivazioni dell’artista, le sue sperimentazioni, il suo manifesto poetico, fisico, intimo.
“Il sangue oggi è oro” – dice Jan Fabre – e nell’esposizione al Museo di Capodimonte l’artista mette in scena un intero universo di simboli che parlano d’arte e di bellezza, di forza e fragilità del genere umano, del ciclo continuo di vita-morte-rinascita.
Il corallo è stato chiamato “oro rosso”, per la sua preziosità e per la sua valenza apotropaica. Come scrive la critica d’arte Melania Rossi sul catalogo della mostra edito da Electa: “Le dieci nuove sculture di corallo rosso che il maestro belga ha creato per la sua mostra personale al museo di Capodimonte sembrano un tesoro proveniente dagli abissi della mente dell’artista. Concrezioni che fanno pensare a fantasiose barriere coralline assumono alcune tra le forme più care a Fabre: teschi, cuori anatomici, croci, spade e pugnali. A loro volta, poi, costellati d’immagini e segni che alludono ad altri significati e ad altre storie, in un ciclo continuo di connessioni fino a creare antichi ibridi tra natura e simbolo, nuovi idoli tra passato e futuro”.
Sempre dal 30 marzo, a cura di Melania Rossi, la scultura di Jan Fabre The man who bears the cross (L’uomo che sorregge la croce)(2015), sarà visibile nella chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, in dialogo diretto con il capolavoro di Caravaggio Sette opere di Misericordia (1606-1607).
La scultura, realizzata completamente in cera, è un autoritratto dell’artista, basato sui tratti somatici dello zio Jaak Fabre, che tiene in bilico una croce di oltre due metri sul palmo della mano. Nel rituale auto-rappresentativo l’artista esce da sé stesso e diviene qualunque uomo, lo specchio di ognuno di noi. Scrive la curatrice: “L’uomo che sorregge la croce (2015) è la rappresentazione dell’interrogarsi, è la celebrazione del dubbio, e con la sua collocazione all’interno del Pio Monte della Misericordia sembra aggiungere un’ottava Opera di Misericordia: confortare chi dubita. Nel dipinto di Caravaggio, il bello e il vero coincidono mirabilmente e la sua opera è un incredibile intreccio di luce e buio in cui la volontà di rappresentare la verità dell’essere umano del 1600 trova piena soddisfazione. Tutta la ricerca di Jan Fabre, artista del nostro tempo, va nella stessa direzione; il ciclo vita-morte-rinascita è centrale nel suo pensiero in cui religione e scienza, simbolo e corpo si compenetrano in un vortice geniale di immagini e azioni”. Il confronto tra il linguaggio seicentesco di Caravaggio e quello contemporaneo fiammingo di Fabre accenderà nuove riflessioni, segnando un ideale e virtuoso passaggio di testimone tra passato e presente artistici.

Dal 30 marzo, inoltre, il Museo Madre, a cura di Andrea VilianiMelania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, ospiterà in anteprima l’iconica sculturaL’uomo che misura le nuvole (2018), in un’inedita versione in marmo di Carrara allestita nel Cortile d’onore del museo regionale d’arte contemporanea.
Dopo la presentazione nel 2008 e nel 2017 della versione in bronzo della stessa scultura in Piazza del Plebiscito e sul terrazzo del museo, Jan Fabre torna a celebrare al Madre la capacità di immaginare, sognare e conoscere, elevandosi oltre il nostro destino di esseri umani. L’uomo che misura le nuvole si ispira dall’affermazione che l’ornitologo Robert Stroud pronunciò nel momento della liberazione dalla prigione di Alcatraz, quando dichiarò che si sarebbe d’ora in poi dedicato appunto a “misurare le nuvole”. Come artista e ricercatore, Fabre tenta costantemente, in effetti, di misurare le nuvole, ovvero di dichiarare con la sua opera che se la tensione verso il sapere ha limiti invalicabili è però possibile esprimere l’inesprimibile attraverso la ricerca artistica, e dare quindi rappresentazione all’intrinseca e fondativa bellezza umana e universale.

Presso la storica galleria Studio Trisorio, sarà esposta una selezione di opere di Jan Fabre realizzate completamente con di gusci di scarabei iridescenti.
La mostra, dal titolo Tribute to Hieronymus Bosch in Congo (Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo), a cura di Melania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, inaugurerà il 29 marzo e vedrà dei grandi pannelli e delle sculture a mosaico di scarabei ispirati alla triste e violenta storia della colonizzazione del Congo belga. In queste opere, l’ispirazione storica si unisce alla simbologia medioevale tratta da uno dei più grandi maestri fiamminghi, uno dei maestri putativi di Jan Fabre, Hieronymus Bosch, e in particolare dal suo capolavoro Il Giardino delle Delizie (1480-1490).
L’inferno di Bosch, ammirato per la sua spiccata inventiva, per molti aspetti divenne una realtà raccapricciante nel Congo Belga. L’opera d’arte è proprio questa combinazione unica di forma e contenuto. L’artista ci porta in una zona indefinita, tra il Paradiso e il Congo Belga, in un’illusione di libertà, in un luogo lontano, sia mitico che concreto, attraverso una polisemia di immagini dell’esistenza umana.

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso
Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue.
Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
Via Miano 2, Napoli
30 marzo – 15 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che sorregge la croce.
Pio Monte della Misericordia
Via dei Tribunali 253, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo.

Studio Trisorio
Riviera di Chiaia 215, Napoli
29 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che misura le nuvole
Museo Madre
Via Luigi Settembrini 79, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

NAPOLI: Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte e altre sedi
Dal 29 Marzo 2019 al 30 Settembre 2019
Ente promotore: MiBAC – Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
T.+39 081 7499111
mu-cap@beniculturali.it

Immagine: Jan Fabre, Golden Human Brain with Angel Wings, 2011. Nero Assoluto / bronzo silicato, oro 24 carati, granito Nero Assoluto, 28×30,5×26 cm

26
Mar

La ferita della bellezza. Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina

Alberto Burri, chiamato a realizzare un intervento per la ricostruzione del paese distrutto dal terremoto nella Valle del Belice del 1968, decide di intervenire sulle macerie della città di Gibellina, creando l’opera di Land Art più grande al mondo. Le ricopre di un sudario bianco, di un’enorme gettata di cemento che ingloba i resti e riveste, in parte ricalcandola, la planimetria della vecchia Gibellina. Culmine del percorso interpretativo sono le fotografie in bianco e nero di Aurelio Amendola sul Grande Cretto. Fotografo che per eccellenza ha raccolto le immagini di Burri, dei suoi lavori e dei processi creativi, Amendola ha realizzato gli scatti in due riprese, nel 2011 e nel 2018, a completamento avvenuto dell’opera (2015).

Nel percorso inoltre, il video di Petra Noordkamp – prodotto e presentato nel 2015 dal Guggenheim Museum di New York, in occasione della grande retrospettiva The Trauma of Painting –  filma in un racconto poetico e di grande sapienza tecnica l’opera di Burri e il paesaggio circostante.

Alcune opere uniche dell’artista, veri e propri capolavori, inoltre, estendono non solo ai Cretti ma anche ai Sacchi, ai Legni, ai Catrami, alle Plastiche e a una selezione di opere grafiche la lettura proposta dal celebre psicanalista.
È una ferita che è dappertutto, che trema ovunque. Una scossa, un tormento, un precipitare di fessurazioni infinite ed ingovernabili.

Come scrive Recalcati in Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina, nei Legni la ferita è generata dal fuoco e dalla carbonizzazione del materiale ma, soprattutto, dal resto che sopravvive alla bruciatura. Nelle Combustioni, lo sgretolamento della materia, la manifestazione della sua umanissima friabilità, della sua più radicale vulnerabilità, viene restituita con grande equilibrio poetico e formale. È ciò che avviene anche con le Plastiche dove, ancora una volta, è sempre l’uso del fuoco a infliggere su di una materia debole ed inconsistente come la plastica, l’ustione della vita e della morte.

In occasione della mostra, realizzato dalla casa editrice Magonza un importante volume stampato su carta di pregio e di grande formato con testimonianze e ricerche inedite su Alberto Burri, la sua opera e Il Grande Cretto di Gibellina. Un nuovo testo di Massimo Recalcati raccoglie gli sviluppi ulteriori della sua ricerca, insieme a interventi di storici dell’arte quali Gianfranco Maraniello e Aldo Iori.

Organizzata una conferenza ad hoc tenuta da Massimo Recalcati, un’occasione di una riflessione ampia sull’opera di Alberto Burri e sulla mostra.

La ferita della bellezza. Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina
Museo Carlo Bilotti Aranciera di Villa Borghese
dal 23 marzo al 9 giugno 2019

nei seguenti orari: dal 23 marzo al 31 maggio 2019
da martedì a venerdì e festivi (lunedì di Pasqua) ore 10.00 – 16.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 15.30)
sabato e domenica ore 10.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30).
Giorni di chiusura: lunedì e 1 maggio

dal 1 al 9 giugno 2019
da martedì a venerdì e festivi ore 13.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30)
sabato e domenica ore 10.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30)
Giorni di chiusura: lunedì

*****************************

Progetto espositivo itinerante. Dopo la tappa romana l’esposizione riallestita da giugno 2019 ad ottobre 2019 al MAG Museo Alto Garda a Riva del Garda in collaborazione con il MART Museo di Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto.

Ingresso gratuito

Tel 060608 (tutti i giorni ore 9.00 – 19.00)
Promossa da Roma Capitale, Assessorato alla Crescita culturale – Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali
con un prestito della Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna di Roma
A cura di Massimo Recalcati con il coordinamento scientifico di Alessandro Sarteanesi
Servizi museali Zètema Progetto Cultura
Prodotta da Magonza editore (www.magonzaeditore.it)
Con il patrocinio di Regione Lazio, Regione Sicilia, Comune di Gibellina, Fondazione Palazzo Albizzini Collezione Burri, Fondazione Orestiadi con un  prestito della Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna di Roma
Con il sostegno di Broker ufficiale; PL Ferrari; A Member of the Lockton Group of Companies