Camera d’Arte

20
Gen

Blanc sur Blanc

Gagosian is pleased to present Blanc sur Blanc, a group exhibition.

A century ago, Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist paintings heralded a revolutionary new interpretation of white, in which total abstraction suggests the utopian and the infinite. Since then, artists have deployed the achromatism of whiteness in an endless range of formal and symbolic ways, evoking states of emptiness and effacement, and summoning the raw potential of the blank page. Working in different contexts and with different ends in mind, the artists in Blanc sur Blanc find unexpected power and substance in what appears at first to be an absence or lack.

In 1946, Lucio Fontana and his students drafted the Manifesto Blanco, a vision for a fundamentally new method of artistic production that demanded that artists engage with the real-world physicality of their materials instead of treating the canvas as an illusory, self-contained space. It was out of this impulse that Fontana produced Concetto Spaziale, Attese(Spatial Concept, Waiting, 1966), one of his first slashed canvases. For Fontana, the painting’s allover coat of white formed a blank screen and acted as a vehicle for heightened drama, with any connotations of purity or tranquility disrupted by his forceful incisions.

During the last decade of his life, Andy Warhol broke with the visual and conceptual language of Pop art to produce idiosyncratic takes on abstract and gestural painting. Abstract Painting (1982) is one such work. Measuring forty inches square—the same dimensions that Warhol used previously for his notorious Society Portraits—the canvas is veiled in a white wash that permits only tantalizing glimpses of multicolored swirls beneath.

LEAN (2005) exemplifies Rachel Whiteread’s practice of concretizing negative space in order to memorialize it. Here she has cast the interiors of various cardboard boxes in plaster of paris as a somewhat wistful tribute to the banal, quotidian container. The resulting geometric accumulation of minimalist white slabs is propped up casually against the gallery wall, ghostlike yet palpable.

Also on view are three recent pieces by Paris-based artist Sheila Hicks, whose textile works incorporate yarn-based techniques from diverse cultures. While Hicks’s oeuvre is characterized by intense color, she also works with natural undyed fibers. Here she has fashioned spheres, woven rectangular canvases, and tumbling cascades of linen in neutral shades that exude a tactile yet meditative calm.

Blanc sur Blanc includes works by Jean (Hans) Arp, Agostino Bonalumi, Enrico Castellani, Edmund de Waal, Lucio Fontana, Theaster Gates, Diego Giacometti, Wade Guyton, Simon Hantaï, Sheila Hicks, Thomas Houseago, Y.Z. Kami, Imi Knoebel, Bertrand Lavier, Sol LeWitt, Sally Mann, John Mason, Olivier Mosset, Giuseppe Penone, Seth Price, Paolo Scheggi, Setsuko, Rudolf Stingel, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Franz West, and Rachel Whiteread, among others.

BLANC SUR BLANC
January 16–March 7, 2020

Gagosian
4 rue de Ponthieu, Paris

Image: Lucio Fontana, Concetto spaziale, Attese, 1966

13
Gen

Dalí & Magritte. Two surrealist icons in dialogue

The Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium dedicate an exceptional exhibition to Salvador Dalí and René Magritte. For the first time ever, the connection and influences between the two greatest icons of the surrealist movement are highlighted.

Dalí and Magritte both aim to challenge reality, question our gaze and shake up our certainties. The Catalan and the Belgian show a fascinating proximity, despite their very different creations and personalities, which would eventually lead them to drift apart.In the spring of 1929, Salvador Dalí and René Magritte meet in Paris, surrounded by the great names of the artistic avant-garde. In August of the same year, at Dalí’s invitation, Magritte travels to Cadaqués, the Spanish painter’s home base. This surrealist summer – which also includes visits by Éluard, Miró and Buñuel – will prove decisive.

The exhibition reveals the personal, philosophical and aesthetic links between these two iconic artists through more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, films and archival objects.

The “Dalí & Magritte” exhibition is held under the High Patronage of their Majesties the King and Queen and is organized by the RMFAB in collaboration with the Dalí Museum (St. Petersburg, Florida), the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation and the Magritte Foundation. More than 40 international museums and private collections have lent their masterpieces for this unique exhibition, which ties in with the festivities organised around the Magritte Museum’s 10th anniversary.
Exhibition curator: Michel Draguet, Director General of the RMFAB.

VIDEO Behind The Scenes at the exhibition DALÍ & MAGRITTE

Dalí & Magritte Two surrealist icons in dialogue

Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
Rue de la Régence/Regentschapsstraat 3
1000 Brussels
+32 (0)2 508 32 11
info@fine-arts-museum.be

Image: Magritte, The Blood of the World, 1925

03
Gen

Tomás Saraceno – Aria

Le opere di Tomás Saraceno (Argentina, 1973) possono essere interpretate come una ricerca continua tra arte, architettura, biologia, astrofisica e ingegneria. Le sue sculture sospese, i suoi progetti collettivi e le sue installazioni interattive propongono ed esplorano nuove forme sostenibili di vivere ed esperire la realtà che ci circonda. La sua arte coinvolge il pubblico in esperienze immaginative e partecipative per ripensare collettivamente il modo in cui abitiamo il mondo, al di là di una prospettiva solo umana.

In quello che costituisce il suo più grande progetto mai realizzato in Italia, l’artista trasformerà Palazzo Strozzi in un nuovo spazio unitario mettendo insieme sue celebri opere e una nuova grande produzione site specific. Affiancata da un ricco programma di attività interdisciplinari, la mostra creerà una sorta di organismo vivente tra l’umano e il non umano, il visibile e l’invisibile, in cui tutti gli esseri entrano in connessione contribuendo alla creazione di una nuova realtà condivisa.

Firenze – Palazzo Strozzi
Tomás Saraceno – Aria
a cura di Arturo Galansino
Dal 22 Febbraio 2020 al 19 Luglio 2020

Tutti i giorni inclusi i festivi 10.00-20.00; Giovedì 10.00-23.00

Enti promotori: Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi e Studio Tomás Saraceno

info: +39 055 2645155

info@palazzostrozzi.org

Immagine: Tomás Saraceno, A Thermodynamic Imaginary, 2018. Photography © Studio Tomás Saraceno, 2018

20
Dic

Shiota Chiharu : The Soul Trembles

Shiota Chiharu: The Soul Trembles is the first grand-scale exhibition in Korea containing works from Shiota Chiharu’s early career in the 1990s through to the present, illustrating the artist’s growing international reputation. It is co-organized by the Busan Museum of Art and Mori Art Museum in Tokyo, Japan, curated by Mami Kataoka, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of Mori Art Museum where it elicited a great response from visitors after opening at Mori Art Museum in June, 2019. Following upon that exhibition at Mori Art Museum, her solo exhibition in Busan centers around four large-scale installation pieces, but features approximately 110 works that allow a comprehensive look at the artist’s activities over the past 25 years.

She is continuing to work with various genres, ranging from large-scale immersive installations incorporating thread and common objects, to sculptural works, photographs, drawings, video, and performance.Through works that visualize questions of the soul, immeasurable anxiety and fear, and her inexplicable existence, the artist expresses an inner state of confronting uncertainty and seeks the meaning of ‘existence’. Utilizing common objects such as thread, dresses, chairs, beds, shoes and bags, the artist creates vast spaces where the memories and relationships embedded in objects are explored. For the artist, the theme of “death” has been a longstanding concern, together with existence and the realm of the unconscious. Her works embody the fear of death she felt at family graves as a child, and the feelings of sorrow and trauma experienced on the border between life and death through two battles with cancer. By capturing these through her works, Shiota approaches death as the beginning of a new life.

Most of her works arise from her personal experiences. However, her works act as the same psychological mechanism for audiences as well to recall life, death and forgotten memories. Going into the 2000s, the artist produced large site-specific installations employing black thread and materials such as window frames, constructing a distinctive formative world of her own. In particular, she is known foremost for her series of immersive installations in which entire spaces are strung with red or black thread, unfolding like human blood vessels or spider webs. The subtitle “The Soul Trembles” references Shiota’s earnest wish to convey to others soul-trembling experiences derived from nameless emotions. In works that elicit ontological thought, she provokes soul-searching of an emotional and primal nature, and her artworks continually raise other questions. These may stem from this time of uncertainty we live in today, when it is increasingly difficult to predict where the many invisible connections in the lives of every individual are leading. Some things that are invisible to humans (the soul, fate, death), along with that uncertainty, may represent fears that are hard to face, and yet they are questions that are ultimately inevitable. Shiota Chiharu: The Soul Trembles is an exhibition that promises to offer an opportunity to reflect on the existence of the individual and to produce new relationships.

Shiota Chiharu (b. 1972) was born in Osaka, Japan, graduated from Kyoto Seika University, and moved to Germany in 1996. She subsequently studied at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg (HFBK), the Braunschweig University of Art (HBK), and the Berlin University of the Arts. Currently based in Berlin, she continues to work internationally. Since her first solo exhibition in 1993, the artist has shown her works in over 300 solo and group exhibitions. She has also participated in numerous international events, including the Sydney Biennale (2016), Busan Biennale (2014), Kiev First International Biennale (2012), and Yokohama Triennale (2001). In 2015, she represented Japan at the 56th Venice Biennale International Art Exhibition, where her work was praised by audiences and art officials.

Shiota Chiharu : The Soul Trembles
Busan Museum of ART
December 17, 2019 – April 19, 2020

Image: Me Somewhere Else,  2018. Blain Southern London. Photo by Peter Mallet

27
Nov

Kate Crawford |Trevor Paglen: Training Humans

“Training Humans”, conceived by Kate Crawford, AI researcher and professor, and Trevor Paglen, artist and researcher, is the first major photography exhibition devoted to training images: the collections of photos used by scientists to train artificial intelligence (AI) systems in how to “see” and categorize the world.

In this exhibition, Crawford and Paglen reveal the evolution of training image sets from the 1960s to today. As stated by Trevor Paglen, “when we first started conceptualizing this exhibition over two years ago, we wanted to tell a story about the history of images used to ‘recognize’ humans in computer vision and AI systems. We weren’t interested in either the hyped, marketing version of AI nor the tales of dystopian robot futures.” Kate Crawford observed, “We wanted to engage with the materiality of AI, and to take those everyday images seriously as a part of a rapidly evolving machinic visual culture. That required us to open up the black boxes and look at how these ‘engines of seeing’ currently operate”.

“Training Humans Symposium” took place on Saturday 26 October at 2.30 pm, engaging with the exhibition. The event involved Prof. Stephanie Dick (University of Pennsylvania), Prof. Eden Medina (MIT), Prof. Jacob Gaboury (University of California, Berkeley), along with the project curators Kate Crawford and Trevor Paglen. Putting the ideas in the exhibit in conversation with their path-breaking work, the speakers examined questions such as: where are the boundaries between science, history, politics, prejudice and ideology in artificial intelligence? And who has the power to build and benefit from these systems?

“Training Humans” explores two fundamental issues in particular: how humans are represented, interpreted and codified through training datasets, and how technological systems harvest, label and use this material. As the classifications of humans by AI systems becomes more invasive and complex, their biases and politics become apparent. Within computer vision and AI systems, forms of measurement easily – but surreptitiously – turn into moral judgments.

Of import to Crawford and Paglen are classificatory taxonomies related to human affect and emotions. Based on the heavily criticized theories of psychologist Paul Ekman, who claimed that the breadth of the human feeling could be boiled down to six universal emotions, AI systems are now measuring people’s facial expressions to assess everything from mental health, whether someone should be hired, to whether a person is going to commit a crime. By looking at the images in this collection, and see how people’s personal photographs have been labeled, raises two essential questions: where are the boundaries between science, history, politics, prejudice and ideology in artificial intelligence? And who has the power to build and benefit from these systems?
As underlined by Crawford, “There is a stark power asymmetry at the heart of these tools. What we hope is that “Training Humans” gives us at least a moment to start to look back at these systems, and understand, in a more forensic way, how they see and categorize us.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated publication in the Quaderni series, published by Fondazione Prada, including a conversation between Kate Crawford and Trevor Paglen on the complex topics addressed in their project.

English below

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