Camera d’Arte

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Jan Fabre – The Rhythm of the Brain

Palazzo Merulana, nato dalla sinergia tra la Fondazione Elena e Claudio Cerasi e CoopCulture, inaugura la stagione espositiva autunnale con una mostra dedicata all’artista belga Jan Fabre, The Rhythm of the Brain, a cura di Achille Bonito Oliva e Melania Rossi.

In esposizione oltre trenta opere dell’artista belga, tra sculture in bronzo e cera, disegni, molte delle quali mai esposte in Italia e alcune scelte appositamente per la Collezione Cerasi. All’interno degli spazi espositivi dell’ex Ufficio di Igiene, la mostra si svilupperà in due capitoli: l’uno si concentra su un dialogo diretto con la collezione permanente e il suo percorso espositivo; l’altro consiste in una selezione di lavori dell’artista sul tema del cervello e del rapporto tra arte e scienza, allestito insieme ad alcuni ritratti e autoritratti della Collezione Elena e Claudio Cerasi.  Una riflessione sull’arte, sull’immaginazione e sul pensiero degli artisti nel corso della storia: oltre ad alcune opere storiche che si pongono in dialogo visivo con il lavoro di Fabre, la mostra vede continui rimandi simbolici e semantici a tutta la collezione permanente del Palazzo.

Il percorso inizia con due sculture in bronzo: To Wear One’s Brain On One’s Head (2018) e De blikopener (2017). Questi autoritratti dell’artista, che porta in bilico il proprio cervello sulla testa e che tiene in mano un apriscatole, saranno una sorta di guida per tutta la mostra, che dispiegherà nei vari spazi del Palazzo l’intimo pensiero di Fabre riguardo all’arte, al pensiero umano, alla fantasia e all’immaginazione.

Jan Fabre sarà inoltre presente al Romaeuropa Festival 2019, dall’11 al 13 ottobre per una corealizzazione con il Teatro Vascello, con lo spettacolo The night writer giornale notturno di Jan Fabre con Lino Musella: un’autobiografia intima e provocatoria tratta da alcune pagine dei diari personali dell’artista affidati all’interpretazione dell’attore italiano Lino Musella.

 Jan Fabre. Con una carriera che dura da quarant’anni, Jan Fabre (1958, Anversa) è considerato una delle figure più innovative nel panorama dell’arte contemporanea internazionale. Come artista visivo e teatrale e come autore crea un’atmosfera intensamente personale con le sue regole, leggi, personaggi, simboli e motivi. Tra le personali più significative di questo versatile artista belga sono da ricordare “Homo Faber” (Kmska, Anversa 2006), “Hortus/ Corpus” (Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo 2011); “Stigmata. Actions and Performances, 1976-2013”, Maxxi, Roma 2013; M hka, Anversa 2015; Mac, Lione 2016; Leopold Museum, Vienna 2017; Caac, Siviglia 2018). Jan Fabre è stato il primo artista vivente a presentare una mostra di ampio respiro al Louvre di Parigi: “L’ange de la métamorphose”, nel 2008. Nel 2016, con “Spiritual Guards” Jan Fabre ha portato una grande mostra presso il Forte Belvedere, Palazzo Vecchio e piazza della Signoria, a Firenze. È stato inoltre invitato da Michail Piotrovskij a realizzare un importante progetto all’Ermitage di San Pietroburgo: “Jan Fabre. Knight of Despair/Warrior of Beauty” (2016-2017). La personale “Glass and Bone Sculptures 1977-2017” è stata presentata come evento collaterale della 57° edizione della Biennale di Venezia (2017). Per Palermo capitale italiana della cultura 2018 MondoMostre ha organizzato “Jan Fabre. Ecstasy & Oracles”, Duomo di Monreale-Valle dei Templi di Agrigento 2018), evento collaterale di Manifesta 12.

Jan Fabre – The Rhythm of the Brain
a cura di Achille Bonito Oliva e Melania Rossi
dall’ 11 ottobre 2019 al 9 febbraio 2020

Palazzo Merulana
via Merulana, 121 – Roma

Orari
Da mercoledì a lunedì, dalle 10.00 alle 20.00, martedì chiuso
Ultimo ingresso ore 19

Info e tariffe
+39 0639967800
info@palazzomerulana.it

In co-realizzazione con Romaeuropa Festival 2019, Flanders State of the Art e galleria Magazzino

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Antony Gormley – Solo Exhibition

Acclaimed sculptor Antony Gormley presents his most significant solo exhibition for over a decade. A conversation between old works and new, it will span his wide-ranging practice and exploit the scale and light of the RA’s architecture.

This exhibition is intended as a form of adventure that invites both physical and imaginative participation. The body in Gormley’s work is not a protagonist in a narrative, nor an ideal, a portrait or a memorial – it is the body inand as space.

Early experimental sculptures, objects and drawings – often made using his own body as a primary tool, material and subject – are brought together with large scale environments made especially for the RA. Using organic, industrial and elemental materials, such as iron, steel, lead, seawater and clay, the solidity and certainty of sculpture is put to the test, acknowledging entropy, disintegration, the experience of disorientation. Our understanding of matter itself is under scrutiny – what it means to have a body, when every ‘thing’ is essentially space and energy. Sculpture, for Antony Gormley, is not treated as a ‘thing apart’, separate from its context; it is a means of interrogating and activating its space and place. His negotiation of the surface of the body, his preoccupation with the space within, treads the line between the body as a container of feeling, a living reality, our ‘condition’, and the body as an abstract entity.

From the British coastline to the rooftops of Manhattan, Antony Gormley’s sculptures are recognised across the world. With work from his 45-year career alongside major new installations created for the galleries of Royal Academy of Arts, it will be present his most ambitious exhibition in more than ten years.

Following in the footsteps of Ai Weiwei and Anselm Kiefer, Antony Gormley will be the next artist to take over our Main Galleries with a series of works that test the scale and light of the RA’s architecture. The exhibition will explore Gormley’s wide-ranging use of organic, industrial and elemental materials over the years, including iron, steel, hand-beaten lead, seawater and clay. We will also bring to light rarely-seen early works from the 1970s and 1980s, some of which led to Gormley using his own body as a tool to create work, as well as a selection of his pocket sketchbooks and drawings.

Throughout a series of experiential installations, some brand-new, some remade for the RA’s galleries, we will invite visitors to slow down and become aware of their own bodies. Highlights include Clearing VII, an immersive ‘drawing in space’ made from kilometres of coiled, flexible metal which visitors find their own path through, and Lost Horizon I, 24 life-size cast iron figures set at different orientations on the walls, floor and ceiling – challenging our perception of which way is up.

Perhaps best-known for his 200-tonne Angel of the North installation near Gateshead, and his project involving 24,000 members of the public for Trafalgar Square’s the Fourth Plinth, Antony Gormley is one of the UK’s most celebrated sculptors.

The exhibition is curated by Martin Caiger-Smith, with Sarah Lea, Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts.

Please note: if you are sensitive to enclosed spaces, one of the works may not be suitable for you to enter. Please ask a member of staff for the best route around. Some of the works contain water, sharp edges and materials that can transfer onto clothing.

Looking for Friends previews? Reserve your slot for 18-20 September

Antony Gormley
Solo Exhibition, Royal Academy of Arts, London, United Kingdom
September 21 – December 3, 2019

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HUMA BHABHA – The Company

There is so much physical destruction happening in different parts of the world, to the extent that many functioning cities look like archeological digs. One of the ways I like to approach the past is in a cinematic way, reimagining the past and projecting towards the future just as movies often do.
—Huma Bhabha

Gagosian is pleased to present The Company, new sculptures and drawings by Huma Bhabha. This is her first exhibition in Rome.

In expressive drawings on photographs as well as figurative sculptures carved from cork and Styrofoam, assembled from refuse and clay, or cast in bronze, Bhabha probes the tensions between time, memory, and displacement. References to science-fiction, archeological ruins, Roman antiquities, and postwar abstraction combine as she transforms the human figure into grimacing totems that are both unsettling and darkly humorous.

The Company is inspired in part by “The Lottery in Babylon” (1941), a short story by Jorge Luis Borges in which a fictional society is taken over by a pervasive lottery system that doles out both rewards and punishments. The lottery is purportedly run by the Company, a secret, perhaps nonexistent body determining peoples’ fates. Bhabha’s procession of sculptures makes visible the power of this unseen Company. It comprises a pair of large, disembodied hands floating atop transparent plinths; a seated figure; and several standing figures of varying scale. Drawings on photographs echo these forms and characters, which could have come from a distant realm of the future just as easily as from a lost civilization. The standing figures are carved from stacks of dark cork—which emits an earthy, acrid odor—and its technical inverse, Styrofoam. These materials appear to be hard and dense, like eroded stone or freshly quarried marble, but they are lightweight and soft, allowing Bhabha to carve quickly and spontaneously without over-refining. The sculptural process thus becomes a sort of embodied stream of consciousness from which alien monsters, fertility goddesses, and Greek kouroi emerge.

The masklike visages of Bhabha’s sculptures are at once majestic and jarring. Painted in incongruous pastel tones—blue, mauve, pink, and green—they recall graffiti, where urban grime combines with interventions of glowing color. With their deranged, cartoonish features empowered by a foreboding bipedalism, Bhabha’s sculptures seem to both mock and warn as reflections of and witnesses to human pride and power, veneration and iconoclasm.

Pairing the scars of war, colonialism, and trauma with allusions to current events and popular media, Bhabha has long maintained that the world is an apocalypse, both man-made and natural; her ravaged sculptures appear to have witnessed some measure of catastrophe yet survived to tell the tale. Like an enthroned pharaoh or cyborg caught in a shower of shrapnel, a seated figure is assembled from sallow clay pressed into chicken wire, mottled fragments of Styrofoam, toy dog bones, and rusted chairs from Bhabha’s hometown of Karachi, caught in the crossfire of internecine and international conflict.

In Bhabha’s large drawings, human and nonhuman figures occupy the intersection of photography, collage, and painterly gesture—their composite faces and shadowy forms seeming to haunt landscapes, city streets, and architectural settings. In one, a blue and beige arch is imposed on Bhabha’s own photograph of an ancient dog statue in Rome’s Musei Capitolini, with two white kouroi looming in the background.

On the occasion of the exhibition, the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea in Rome will host a conversation between Bhabha and Cristiana Perrella, director of the Centro per l’Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci in Prato, on September 18 at 6pm. The event will be held in English and open to the public.

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Andrei Tarkovsky – The Exhibition

With associative films rich in imagery, such as Andrei Rublev (1966), Solaris (1972), The Mirror (1974) and especially Stalker (1979), Andrei Tarkovsky (1932‒1986) made his name as a leading innovator of the language of cinema. This autumn, Eye presents an exhibition and film programme devoted to the celebrated filmmaker and mystic, focusing specifically on Tarkovsky’s quest for existential truth. In addition to immersing the visitor in Tarkovsky’s imagery, the exhibition includes unique documents — letters, photos and Polaroids — that have never previously been displayed in the Netherlands. Moreover, the accompanying film programme features digitally restored films.

The work of Andrei Tarkovsky weaves together dreams and memories, past and present. The painterly beauty of his images, his metaphysical reflections on humanity, and his lucid observations about cinema still inspire new generations of filmmakers and artists. Filmmakers such as Béla Tarr and Alexander Sokurov are considered his most direct descendants in the world of film.

inner voice, personal visual idiom
Beyond the straitjacket of social-realist Soviet cinema, Tarkovsky developed a unique body of work in which he saw life as a spiritual quest for truth and self-knowledge. He called it the ‘inner voice of humankind’, which could only be heard within range of the magical and transcendental. He saw his films as ‘hieroglyphics of absolute truth’, acts of non-rational creation that, more than analytical science, were capable of revealing existential meaning.

For Tarkovsky, who died in 1986, film was the ideal medium for getting close to ‘real’ life. Of all the arts, film comes closest to the laws and patterns of human thought and life, he contended — and that made it the most truthful form of art. The style of Tarkovsky’s films was determined by extremely long takes, a very slowly moving camera, remarkable use of sound and music, and an alternation of coloured and monochrome sequences.

exhibition concept

The exhibition has been conceived to get as close as possible to Tarkovsky and his work. That is why it will immerse visitors in the director’s imagery, intoxicating them, as it were, with numerous precisely chosen fragments from his films. This approach follows the ideas of the filmmaker regarding the ‘poetry of the image’ and the necessity of a ‘poetic logic’ and a ‘poetic montage’.

private memories

Especially unique is the collection of Polaroids and photographs – never previously shown in the Netherlands – made by Tarkovsky in a private capacity and while filming. The exhibition will also include material from Tarkovsky’s private archives, including letters, scripts and other documents that have never before been presented. These mementos of Tarkovsky’s personal and professional life have been made available by Tarkovsky’s son Andrei Andrejevich Tarkovsky.

film programme

The accompanying programme features Tarkovsky’s entire body of work, mostly in the form of digital restorations, including The Mirror (1974), Solaris (1972),  and his last film, The Sacrifice (1986). Also included are films by directors who inspired Tarkovsky (Sergei Parajanov, Robert Bresson) and by directors who Tarkovsky inspired (Lars von Trier, Alex Garland). Six of Tarkovsky’s films will be distributed nationally by Eye.

For those interested in Russia’s Soviet past, a six-part lecture series is being organized in collaboration with Russia expert Otto Boelen from Leiden University.

The art magazine Kunstschrift will publish a special issue devoted to Tarkovsky.

Founded in 2012, Eye Filmmuseum in Amsterdam was based on the former Dutch Cinematheque and focuses its exhibition programme on the intersection between film and visual arts. Eye explores the interplay between film and visual arts and vice versa. Recent exhibitions have been organised with artists and filmmakers such as William Kentridge, Ryoji Ikeda, Jesper Just, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, João Gusmão & Pedro Paiva, Anthony McCall, Jan Svankmajer and many others.

Andrei Tarkovsky – The Exhibition
Curated by Jaap Guldemond, in collaboration with Marente Bloemheuvel.
Exhibition, films, talks & events
September 14–December 6, 2019

Eye Filmmuseum
IJpromenade 1
1031 KT Amsterdam
The Netherlands

Image: Stalker, 1976, Andrei Tarkovsky

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Ryoji Ikeda – A Cosmic Journey from Infinitesimal to Astronomical

Ryoji Ikeda’s solo exhibition is on view on the ground floor of Taipei Fine Arts Museum until November 17, 2019. TFAM curator Jo Hsiao and guest curator Eva Lin have joined forces for the most comprehensive solo exhibition of works spanning Ikeda’s career in Asia since 2009. The selected artworks include large-scale sound sculptures, audiovisual installations, light boxes and two-dimensional works, which are newly conceived and exhibited for the very first time, forming an immersive space-time landscape that vaults from microscopic to macroscopic dimensions.

Ryoji Ikeda is one of only a few artists renowned internationally for both visual and sound art. His artistic explorations range from math, quantum mechanics, physics and philosophy to synthesized audio tones, music and video. His live performances, installations, and long-term projects involving print publications and music recordings constitute a distinctive creative terrain. Ikeda has exhibited around the world, including Park Avenue Armory in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, ArtScience Museum in Singapore, and the ZKM Center for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, Germany. He is the recipient of the 3rd Prix Ars Electronica Collide @ CERN, winning the artist-in-residence program at CERN. Even though he never received formal training in art or music, Ikeda began absorbing music from a broad spectrum of genres at an early age, and later he began experimenting with editing music, manipulating magnetic tape and toying with sound frequencies. In 1994 he became a member of the multimedia art collective Dumb Type, whose works involved exhibitions, theater, dance, music and publishing. Through these cross-disciplinary collaborations, Ikeda turned his attention to theater and art exhibitions. Later, he began to do sound art performances and became active in music festivals, creating sound installations and releasing albums.

By 1995 Ikeda had begun to gradually abandon the use of repetitive musical elements in his sound creations, instead exploring the fundamental question, “What is sound?” and launching an in-depth study of its physical nature. Thoroughly reducing sounds down to their smallest units, he then rearranged and reassembled them, employing such basic elements as pure sine waves and white noise to create composite soundscapes with shifting resonances, and challenging the limits of human aural perception. In this way, he became a pioneer of minimal electronic music. Since 2000, he has followed this spirit of questing for the essence, breaking the basic structure of light down to the level of pixels, while reducing the world to data. Ikeda makes art with the mindset of a composer, incorporating physical phenomena such as sound, light, space and time as elements in his compositions. Achieving a precise expressive structure through the use of mathematical calculations, he transforms rigorous arithmetic logic into artistic forms, endowing his works with his own unique data aesthetic.Continue Reading..