Category: video arte

04
Giu

FORNASETTI Theatrum Mundi

Centinaia di creazioni dell’atelier fondato da Piero Fornasetti in dialogo con le collezioni della Pilotta per raccontare la classicità attraverso la lente del design contemporaneo.

Il 3 giugno 2020 inaugura Fornasetti Theatrum Mundi, mostra ospitata all’interno del Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta di Parma. L’esposizione sarà aperta al pubblico fino al 14 febbraio 2021 e si colloca all’interno di “Rivitalizzazioni del Contemporaneo”, bando ideato in occasione di Parma 2020+21, Capitale Italiana della Cultura.

La mostra, inaugurata in concomitanza con la riapertura del Complesso della Pilotta dopo il lungo periodo di sospensione dovuto all’emergenza COVID-19, ha generato in questi mesi una particolare aspettativa da parte del pubblico, della stampa e degli appassionati.

L’esposizione è un vero e proprio viaggio stratificato tra classico e moderno, tra passato e presente, la cui curatela è di Barnaba Fornasetti, Direttore Artistico dell’Atelier milanese, di Valeria Manzi, co-curatrice delle attività culturali e Presidente dell’associazione Fornasetti Cult, e del direttore del Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta Simone Verde, con l’intento di rigenerare il patrimonio classico e classicità dell’istituto museale autonomo parmigiano, attraverso la ripresa intellettuale che ne ha fatto uno dei maestri indiscussi del design contemporaneo.

Fornasetti Theatrum Mundi mette in dialogo le architetture e le opere della Pilotta con l’immaginario di Piero e Barnaba Fornasetti, creando un vero e proprio ‘teatro del mondo’: una rete di rimandi iconografici e suggestioni culturali che rivela lo statuto intellettuale degli oggetti esposti e delle immagini in mostra, rendendone visibile lo spessore e regalando universali ed emozionanti implicazioni. Un vero e proprio “Theatrum” nel significato cinquecentesco, dunque, che declina nell’infinita varietà del mondo l’enciclopedica unitarietà del sapere a cui aspirava il classicismo, sia rinascimentale che settecentesco e, grazie alla chiave ludica di Fornasetti, anche contemporaneo.

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02
Mar

ZERO IS INFINITY

Yayoi Kusama Museum is delighted to announce its first major group exhibition, ZERO IS INFINITY, ZERO and Yayoi Kusama, featuring Kusama’s activity in Europe during the 1960s, introducing ZERO’s art practices and also exploring their relationship with Kusama.

“ZERO” indicated in a narrow sense the name of the group formed by Mack and Piene in 1958 in Düsseldorf, Germany, with Günther Uecker later joining in 1961. However, by publishing the magazine ZERO and holding many exhibitions, ZERO’s activity began to involve many active artists, groups and movements from various places in Europe: Yves Klein from France, Piero Manzoni and Enrico Castellani from Italy, and Henk Peeters and Jan Schoonhoven, founding members of Dutch avant-garde group Nul from the Netherlands. Like the resetting of the European continent separated under World War II, ZERO has been a powerful motivation for transnational collaboration between avant-garde artists.

At the time, Yayoi Kusama was based in New York and participated in many exhibitions along with other leading artists of Pop art and Minimalism. While she received high acclaim from the New York art world, she regularly presented her art across Europe, in particular at exhibitions led by ZERO, attracting attention in the European art scene in the 1960s. Kusama’s first invitation to the European exhibitions was for Monochrome Painting (Monochrome Malerei), curated by Udo Kultermann, and held at Morsbroich Museum, Leverkusen in 1960. After participating in this international exhibition, Kusama started correspondence with ZERO artists such as Peeters. Kusama’s pursuit of “Infinity” through her art finds various similarities with artistic expressions in the works of ZERO artists: in their experiments with new materials such as mirror, repetitions of single motifs, pursuit of monochrome and their orientations towards environment art and performance.

In this context, ZERO IS INFINITY explores the transnational developments in Kusama’s and ZERO’s activities during the 1960s, by showcasing their works and documentation materials. The group show displays a work from Infinity Nets, Kusama’s monochrome painting series, a series shown in Europe for the first time at the above-mentioned exhibition in 1960. The newest work in her Infinity Mirror Rooms series, Longing for Infinite Heaven, as well as a reproduction of Christian Megert’s Mirror Wall (Spiegelwand) installation are also presented. Other highlights of the exhibition include another Kusama installation, Narcissus Garden,which was first presented in the 33rd Venice Biennale in 1966 with financial support from Lucio Fontana, who also exhibits an artwork from his signature series Spatial Concept (Concetto Spaziale) at this show.Continue Reading..

14
Feb

Franco Vaccari – Migrazione del reale

Migrazione del reale is the first solo exhibition by Franco Vaccari (Modena, 1936) at Galleria P420.

Migrazione del reale is based on Vaccari’s deep interest in dreams, which since 1975 have been the focus of five Esposizioni in tempo reale (exhibitions in real time) as well as a vast output of works closely connected with things dreamt by the artist himself over a span of nearly 40 years. Already in his participation in the Venice Biennale in 1972, Vaccari put aside the traditional role of the artist, acting as an instigator of processes by installing a Photomatic booth with a sign on the wall encouraging visitors to leave a trace of their passage in the space. The main lines of this action then went through a predictable, logical development. But when dreams make their appearance in the Exhibitions in real time “the role of a ‘remote controller’ dissolved, in turn, to the extent that the dream functions as an activator of reality—as the artist himself explains—namely as a pretext to detour an apparently definite situation towards unexpected results, unexpected reality.” In the early 1980s Vaccari began a singular artistic practice, painstakingly annotating and illustrating his nocturnal dreams in notebooks; over the decades, he has created a series of works in which photography and painting coexist to represent subjects and forms that have not been sought, not been studied, but are totally suggested by mechanisms of the unconscious.

I would like to emphasize the fact that I am not interested in the surreal or disorienting dimension of dreams—Vaccari writes in a text from 1985—nor in aspects of the extraordinary, the exceptional, even the psychoanalytic. I am attracted by the ‘real’ dimension of dreams. The real world has been emptied of reality, while at the same time reality has migrated towards the territory of dreams.”

But another image complicates the relationship between dream and reality. Migrazione del reale presents a video installation in which the Oumuamua interstellar asteroid looms in a sidereal space, perhaps closer than we might think. Reality reveals itself in all its oneiric character, and dreams and nightmares seem to take on a weight that is more than real.

Oumuamua, a messenger from afar arriving first as the name might be translated, the first interstellar object to literally cross the orbital planes of the planets of our solar system and then disappear back into interstellar space, exists in reality, like a premonitory dream.

Among Vaccari’s most recent exhibitions: the 5th Ural Industrial Biennial of Contemporary Art, Urals and Siberia (2019), Tutto. Prospettive sull’arte italiana, MUSEION, Bolzano (2018);Matriz do tempo real, curated by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti, MAC USP, Sao Paulo, (2018); and Take Me (I’m Yours), curated by Christian Boltanski, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Chiara Parisi, Roberta Tenconi, Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2017). An important event is now being programmed at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 2020.

Franco Vaccari – Migrazione del reale
P420, Bologna / Italy
January 25–March 21, 2020

P420
Via Azzo Gardino 9
40122 Bologna
Italy
Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 10:30am–1:30pm,
Tuesday–Saturday 3–7:30pm

T +39 051 484 7957
info@p420.it

Image: Franco Vaccari, Oumuamua (messaggero che arriva per primo da lontano), 2020, video installation, 5’15’’ (courtesy credit ESO/M. Kornmesser, USA)

13
Gen

Dalí & Magritte. Two surrealist icons in dialogue

The Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium dedicate an exceptional exhibition to Salvador Dalí and René Magritte. For the first time ever, the connection and influences between the two greatest icons of the surrealist movement are highlighted.

Dalí and Magritte both aim to challenge reality, question our gaze and shake up our certainties. The Catalan and the Belgian show a fascinating proximity, despite their very different creations and personalities, which would eventually lead them to drift apart.In the spring of 1929, Salvador Dalí and René Magritte meet in Paris, surrounded by the great names of the artistic avant-garde. In August of the same year, at Dalí’s invitation, Magritte travels to Cadaqués, the Spanish painter’s home base. This surrealist summer – which also includes visits by Éluard, Miró and Buñuel – will prove decisive.

The exhibition reveals the personal, philosophical and aesthetic links between these two iconic artists through more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, films and archival objects.

The “Dalí & Magritte” exhibition is held under the High Patronage of their Majesties the King and Queen and is organized by the RMFAB in collaboration with the Dalí Museum (St. Petersburg, Florida), the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation and the Magritte Foundation. More than 40 international museums and private collections have lent their masterpieces for this unique exhibition, which ties in with the festivities organised around the Magritte Museum’s 10th anniversary.
Exhibition curator: Michel Draguet, Director General of the RMFAB.

VIDEO Behind The Scenes at the exhibition DALÍ & MAGRITTE

Dalí & Magritte Two surrealist icons in dialogue

Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
Rue de la Régence/Regentschapsstraat 3
1000 Brussels
+32 (0)2 508 32 11
info@fine-arts-museum.be

Image: Magritte, The Blood of the World, 1925

27
Nov

Kate Crawford |Trevor Paglen: Training Humans

“Training Humans”, conceived by Kate Crawford, AI researcher and professor, and Trevor Paglen, artist and researcher, is the first major photography exhibition devoted to training images: the collections of photos used by scientists to train artificial intelligence (AI) systems in how to “see” and categorize the world.

In this exhibition, Crawford and Paglen reveal the evolution of training image sets from the 1960s to today. As stated by Trevor Paglen, “when we first started conceptualizing this exhibition over two years ago, we wanted to tell a story about the history of images used to ‘recognize’ humans in computer vision and AI systems. We weren’t interested in either the hyped, marketing version of AI nor the tales of dystopian robot futures.” Kate Crawford observed, “We wanted to engage with the materiality of AI, and to take those everyday images seriously as a part of a rapidly evolving machinic visual culture. That required us to open up the black boxes and look at how these ‘engines of seeing’ currently operate”.

“Training Humans Symposium” took place on Saturday 26 October at 2.30 pm, engaging with the exhibition. The event involved Prof. Stephanie Dick (University of Pennsylvania), Prof. Eden Medina (MIT), Prof. Jacob Gaboury (University of California, Berkeley), along with the project curators Kate Crawford and Trevor Paglen. Putting the ideas in the exhibit in conversation with their path-breaking work, the speakers examined questions such as: where are the boundaries between science, history, politics, prejudice and ideology in artificial intelligence? And who has the power to build and benefit from these systems?

“Training Humans” explores two fundamental issues in particular: how humans are represented, interpreted and codified through training datasets, and how technological systems harvest, label and use this material. As the classifications of humans by AI systems becomes more invasive and complex, their biases and politics become apparent. Within computer vision and AI systems, forms of measurement easily – but surreptitiously – turn into moral judgments.

Of import to Crawford and Paglen are classificatory taxonomies related to human affect and emotions. Based on the heavily criticized theories of psychologist Paul Ekman, who claimed that the breadth of the human feeling could be boiled down to six universal emotions, AI systems are now measuring people’s facial expressions to assess everything from mental health, whether someone should be hired, to whether a person is going to commit a crime. By looking at the images in this collection, and see how people’s personal photographs have been labeled, raises two essential questions: where are the boundaries between science, history, politics, prejudice and ideology in artificial intelligence? And who has the power to build and benefit from these systems?
As underlined by Crawford, “There is a stark power asymmetry at the heart of these tools. What we hope is that “Training Humans” gives us at least a moment to start to look back at these systems, and understand, in a more forensic way, how they see and categorize us.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated publication in the Quaderni series, published by Fondazione Prada, including a conversation between Kate Crawford and Trevor Paglen on the complex topics addressed in their project.

English below

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05
Nov

Julie Wolfe. Under Their Gaze, We Become Creatures

We are distressed by the daily cycle of hateful and self-serving rhetoric. It skews us into unful lling reactions. We are out-of-whack. We ght to avoid turning o . Though ill-at-ease, there is hope of something blooming from our better nature. In a small and special part of our society a growing number of artists are speaking of redress and solace. In their work we can find the energy to turn back on. It is at this moment, within these circumstances, that the Hemphill gallery presents the fourth Julie Wolfe exhibition. To quote the artist, “After the election some dark things became more apparent. My awareness has been heightened. Along with many others, I am concerned about the social and cultural impact of this sort of spiritual crisis, about the lack of truth. Through my work I am finding ways to cope and be hopeful. The upcoming show is a response. The show contains works from three series. There is the confrontational character of the ‘Under Their Gaze, We Become Creatures’ series. In the landscapes from the ‘Venus Site Speci c’ series there is an otherworldliness. And in the ‘Magnitude of Equality’ paintings the gravity defying e ects of the color and gray scale studies speak of the power of diversity and equality.”

The artist describes her show as a response to current events, but none of the works in Under Their Gaze, We Become Creatures are didactic. Each piece carefully provokes thoughts of potential catastrophe, present dangers, or feelings of dislocation. Yet the show is colorful, hopeful. We experience a sense of generosity in the artist’s viewpoint. “I hope you find something to respond to, something to contemplate, to remember, something that opens up in you.” Great artworks are machines of perpetual motion. They move us from tradition, responding in the present, pushing us towards the future. The artist reminds us that art is always connected to society.

The limited edition folio, Dream Sequel Series: Under Their Gaze, We Become Creatures, is published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Julie Wolfe (American, born 1963) is a visual and conceptual artist living and working in Washington, DC. Her work is exhibited and collected internationally and has been featured in ARTnews, BBC America and Hyperallergic. She has published numerous limited edition artist books and folios, and has held residencies at AGA Lab, the Netherlands, and Mass MOCA. Wolfe received a BFA in Painting and Art History from The University of Texas, Austin, TX.

H E M P H I L L  opened as a commercial gallery in September of 1993. The exhibition schedule features contemporary art ranging in media from emerging to mid-career and established artists. In addition to these shows the gallery mounts exhibitions of historically significant artwork and socially relevant subjects. The diversity of this schedule is designed to showcase important talent and provide artwork appealing to a broad range of interests.

HEMPHILL Fine Arts
1515 14th Street NW #300
Washington DC, 20005

Phone: 202.234.5601
Fax: 202.234.5607
gallery@hemphillfinearts.com

Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 5pm and by appointment.

JULIE WOLFE
Under Their Gaze, We Become Creatures
Until November 16, 2019

Image: JULIE WOLFE. Direct Daylight, 201, ph. amalia di lanno

report gallery by amaliadilanno

10
Ott

Musja. The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?

Christian Boltanski, Monica Bonvicini, Monster Chetwynd, Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Sheela Gowda, James Lee Byars, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Gregor Schneider, Chiharu Shiota

Curated by Danilo Eccher

Musja, the exhibition space in via dei Chiavari 7 in Rome presided over by Ovidio Jacorossi, becomes a private museum with the opening on October 9 of Who is afraid of the Dark?, the first exhibition within The Dark Side project, a three year programme curated by Danilo Eccher.

The vast art collection owned by Jacorossi, covering the period from the early 19th century Italian to the present, will be flanked by the most innovative contemporary trends in the international panorama in order to highlight the fundamental contribution of art to personal and collective growth. The new museum also sets out to become established as a focus for the development of civil society in Rome, and to carry forward cultural commitment, and dialogue with international public and private institutions and museums.

The complex thematic setting of The Dark Side project is organized into three exhibitions spread over three years, and dedicated to: “Fear of the Dark,” “Fear of Solitude,” and “Fear of Time.” The first event in the new exhibition programme—“Fear of the Dark”—brings together 13 of the most important international artists with large site-specific installations and large-scale artworks by established artists, such as Gregor Schneider, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Christian Boltanski, James Lee Byars as well as new protagonists on the contemporary art scene such as Monster Chetwynd, Sheela Gowda, and Chiharu Shiota. There is a substantial Italian component with works and installations by Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Monica Bonvicini. During the opening of the exhibition, and thereafter at monthly intervals, there will be a performance by “Differenziale Femminile,” a group of four actresses, in the rooms of the gallery.

The majority of the site-specific works will be produced especially for the exhibition, while others are loans from various institutions, galleries and some others are part of the Jacorossi collection. All of them were selected for their power to draw the viewer in and encourage reflection on the topic while, at the same time, introducing some essential aspects of current contemporary art research. Visitors will be able to analyse their own reactions to sensory and tactile experiences, theatrical and magical visions, rituals and settings, anxieties that take different and unexpected forms only to melt away.

The catalogue accompanying the exhibition, published by Silvana Editoriale, contains a wealth of images by all the participating artists as well as written contributions. In addition to Danilo Eccher’s contribution, there are also some intellectually complex views on the theme of the dark by theologian Gianfranco Ravasi, theoretical physicist Mario Rasetti, psychiatrist Eugenio Borgna and philosopher Federico Vercellone. Different points of view, cross-cutting approaches, intellectual fields that diverge, overlap and are interwoven, give the project much greater scope than a standard art exhibition.

In the course of the exhibition, Musja will also be holding a series of meetings on the theme, coordinated by Federico Vercellone, professor of Aesthetics in the Department of Philosophy at Turin University.

The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?
October 9, 2019–March 1, 2020

Musja
via dei Chiavari 7
Rome
Italy

Image artwork by Gino De Dominicis, Jacorossi collection

06
Set

Ryoji Ikeda – A Cosmic Journey from Infinitesimal to Astronomical

Ryoji Ikeda’s solo exhibition is on view on the ground floor of Taipei Fine Arts Museum until November 17, 2019. TFAM curator Jo Hsiao and guest curator Eva Lin have joined forces for the most comprehensive solo exhibition of works spanning Ikeda’s career in Asia since 2009. The selected artworks include large-scale sound sculptures, audiovisual installations, light boxes and two-dimensional works, which are newly conceived and exhibited for the very first time, forming an immersive space-time landscape that vaults from microscopic to macroscopic dimensions.

Ryoji Ikeda is one of only a few artists renowned internationally for both visual and sound art. His artistic explorations range from math, quantum mechanics, physics and philosophy to synthesized audio tones, music and video. His live performances, installations, and long-term projects involving print publications and music recordings constitute a distinctive creative terrain. Ikeda has exhibited around the world, including Park Avenue Armory in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, ArtScience Museum in Singapore, and the ZKM Center for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, Germany. He is the recipient of the 3rd Prix Ars Electronica Collide @ CERN, winning the artist-in-residence program at CERN. Even though he never received formal training in art or music, Ikeda began absorbing music from a broad spectrum of genres at an early age, and later he began experimenting with editing music, manipulating magnetic tape and toying with sound frequencies. In 1994 he became a member of the multimedia art collective Dumb Type, whose works involved exhibitions, theater, dance, music and publishing. Through these cross-disciplinary collaborations, Ikeda turned his attention to theater and art exhibitions. Later, he began to do sound art performances and became active in music festivals, creating sound installations and releasing albums.

By 1995 Ikeda had begun to gradually abandon the use of repetitive musical elements in his sound creations, instead exploring the fundamental question, “What is sound?” and launching an in-depth study of its physical nature. Thoroughly reducing sounds down to their smallest units, he then rearranged and reassembled them, employing such basic elements as pure sine waves and white noise to create composite soundscapes with shifting resonances, and challenging the limits of human aural perception. In this way, he became a pioneer of minimal electronic music. Since 2000, he has followed this spirit of questing for the essence, breaking the basic structure of light down to the level of pixels, while reducing the world to data. Ikeda makes art with the mindset of a composer, incorporating physical phenomena such as sound, light, space and time as elements in his compositions. Achieving a precise expressive structure through the use of mathematical calculations, he transforms rigorous arithmetic logic into artistic forms, endowing his works with his own unique data aesthetic.Continue Reading..

20
Ago

MARIA LAI. Tenendo per mano il sole

Giocavo con grande serietà e ad a un certo punto i miei giochi li hanno chiamati arte – Maria Lai
www.maxxi.art#MariaLai

In occasione del centenario della nascita, il MAXXI dedica una grande mostra a Maria Lai. Esposti oltre 200 lavori che restituiscono una biografia complessa e affascinante e un approccio alla creatività libero e privo di pregiudizi. Si intitola Tenendo per mano il sole la grande mostra che il MAXXI Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo dedica a Maria Lai (1919 – 2013), una tra le voci più singolari dell’arte italiana contemporanea. Artista dalla straordinaria capacità generativa, in anticipo su ricerche artistiche che saranno sviluppate solo successivamente, Lai ha saputo creare un linguaggio differente e originale, pur consapevole del lungo processo di decantazione che la sua arte avrebbe dovuto attraversare per essere riconosciuta. Oggi quel processo sembra essersi compiuto. Negli ultimi anni molte sono state le iniziative a lei dedicate e i suoi lavori sono stati recentemente esposti a Documenta 14 e alla Biennale di Venezia 2017. “Nel 2019 – indica Giovanna Melandri, Presidente della Fondazione MAXXI – abbiamo scelto di rivolgere particolare attenzione alle visioni artistiche femminili e non poteva, dunque, mancare un progetto legato a Maria Lai. Con questa mostra, infatti, rendiamo un tributo alla figura ed all’opera di una donna che ha saputo interpretare nel corso della sua carriera artistica infiniti linguaggi, sempre però nel solco della sua ricerca: rappresentare e reinventare con delicatezza e poesia tradizioni e simboli di una cultura arcaica, eterna e rivolgersi con forza ed immediatezza ai contemporanei”. La retrospettiva al MAXXI si concentra su ciò che viene definito il suo secondo periodo, ovvero sulle opere che l’artista crea a partire dagli anni Sessanta e che ricomincia ad esporre, dopo una lunga assenza dalla scena pubblica e artistica, solo nel 1971. “Questo perché – sottolinea Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, Direttore MAXXI Arte – è proprio da quel momento, sino alla sua scomparsa nel 2013, che sono presenti nel lavoro di Maria Lai, in maniera più evidente, molte delle istanze che ne fanno oggi un’artista estremamente attuale e che permettono di restituire alla sua figura una posizione centrale nella storia dell’arterecente”.

La mostra, a cura di Bartolomeo Pietromarchi e Luigia Lonardelli, è realizzata in collaborazione con Archivio Maria Lai eFondazione Stazione dell’Arte, con il patrocinio del Comune di Ulassai e il sostegno di Fondazione di Sardegna. Esposti oltre 200 lavori, tra cui Libri cuciti, sculture, Geografie, opere pubbliche e i suoi celebri Telai, per raccontare nel modo più completo possibile la personalità di Maria Lai e i diversi aspetti del suo lavoro. In mostra anche alcune opere recentemente entrate a far parte della Collezione del MAXXI: Terra, 1984; Il viaggiatore astrale, 1989; Bisbigli, 1996; Pagina cucita, 1978 e Senza titolo, 2009, una rara Geografia su acetato in corso didonazione.

La mostra
Tenendo per mano il sole è il titolo della mostra e della prima Fiaba cucita realizzata. Sia nel titolo che nell’opera sono presenti molti degli elementi tipici della ricerca di Lai: il suo interesse per la poesia, il linguaggio e la parola; la cosmogonia delle sue geografie evocata dal sole; la vocazione pedagogica del “tenere per mano”. Non una classica retrospettiva, ma piuttosto un racconto che non si attiene a vincoli puramente cronologici e asseconda un percorso biografico e artistico peculiare, caratterizzato da discorsi e intuizioni apparentemente lasciati in sospeso per poi essere ripresi molti anni più tardi.

Attraverso un’ampia selezione di opere, in buona parte inedite, la mostra presenta il poliedrico mondo di Maria Lai e la fitta stratificazione di idee e suggestioni che ha caratterizzato il suo immaginario. Il percorso si snoda attraverso cinque sezioni, che prendono il nome da citazioni o titoli di opere di Lai, mentre nel sottotitolo vengono descritte modalità tipiche della sua ricerca; ogni sezione è accompagnata dalla voce di Maria Lai attraverso un montaggio di materiali inediti realizzati dal regista Francesco Casu. C’è anche un’ultima, ideale, sezione, che documenta le opere di arte ambientale realizzate nel territorio e in particolare in Ogliastra. La sezione Essere è tessere. Cucire e ricucire documenta le prime prove realizzate negli anni Sessanta, un decennio in cui decide di abbandonare la tecnica grafica e pittorica per dedicarsi alla sperimentazione con i materiali. Nascono così i primi Telai e le Tele cucite: oggetti funzionali del quotidiano, legati all’artigianato sardo, vengono privati della loro funzione pratica per essere trasformati in opere che dimostrano una fervida ricerca espressiva. Il filo rappresenta anche un’idea di trasmissione e comunicazione, Lai vede l’arte come strumento e linguaggio capace di modificare la nostra lettura del mondo, un’attitudine che le deriva dalla sua storia personale di insegnante e che si manifesterà in seguito nei Libri e nelle Fiabe cucite. L’arte è il gioco degli adulti. Giocare e Raccontare raccoglie i giochi dell’arte creati da Lai, riletture di giochi tradizionali con cui ribadisce il ruolo fondante della creazione nella società. Gioco come mezzo per conoscere se stessi e per imparare a relazionarsi con l’altro, un’attività da non relegare al mondo dell’infanzia, ma da continuare a coltivare in età adulta. La sezione Oggetto paesaggio. Disseminare e condividere, racconta l’aspetto relazionale della pratica di Lai attraverso un ampio corpus di oggetti legati a un suo universo affettivo, tra cui sculture che simulano l’aspetto di un libro o di singole pagine, forme che richiamano manufatti del quotidiano, rivendicando però una propria inedita individualità. Il viaggiatoreastrale.Continue Reading..

30
Lug

Marina Abramovic all’Ambrosiana

Dal 18 Ottobre al 31 Dicembre 2019, Marina Abramovic arriva nel complesso della Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, nell’area soterranea dell’antico foro romano di Milano, all’interno del percorso di visita della Cripta di San Sepolcro, con il ciclo di video The Kitchen. Homage to Saint Therese.

La Cripta di San Sepolcro, da poco riportata a pieno splendore grazie ai grandi lavori di restauro che la hanno interessata, continua a svelarsi nel connubio con la video arte e i grandi artisti contemporanei, iniziato nel 2017 con Bill Viola e proseguita poi con Michelangelo Antonioni e Andy Warhol.

The Kitchen. Homage to Saint Therese è un’opera molto significativa nella quale Marina Abramovic si relaziona con una delle più importanti figure del cattolicesimo, Santa Teresa d’Avila. L’opera si compone di tre video, che documentano altrettante performance tenute nel 2009 dall’artista nell’ex convento di La Laboral a Gijón, in Spagna.

Curata da Casa Testori e prodotta dal Gruppo MilanoCard, gestore della Cripta di San Sepolcro, in collaborazione con la Veneranda Biblioteca e Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, la mostra interesserà l’area sotterranea della Pinacoteca Ambrosiana dove sorgeva il Foro Romano (oggi Sala dell’area del Foro) e sarà parte del percorso di visita che porterà a rivedere la Cripta di San Sepolcro.

Marina Abramovic all’Ambrosiana
18 Ottobre – 31 Dicembre 2019
Martedi-venerdi 12-20 / sabato e domenica 10-20
www.criptasansepolcromilano.it

Image Up_Marina Abramović “The Kitchen V, Carrying the Milk”, from the series The Kitchen, Homage to Saint Therese. Video installation, color, 2009 (© Marina Abramović – Courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives)