Category: fotografia

17
Giu

DORA MAAR in Paris

The largest French retrospective ever devoted to Dora Maar (1907-1997) invites you to discover all the facets of her work, through more than five hundred works and documents. Initially a professional photographer and surrealist before becoming a painter, Dora Maar is an artist of undeniable renown. Far beyond the image, to which she is all too often limited, of her intimate relationship with Picasso, this exhibition retraces the life of an accomplished artist and a free and independent intellectual.

The exhibition is organized by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, in coproduction with the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and in collaboration with the Tate Modern (London).

PRESENTATION BY THE CURATORS
“To Dora of the varied, always beautiful, faces”. Lise Deharme’s dedication to her friend Dora Maar in a copy of Cœur de Pic (1937) poetically sums up the various facets of her artistic career: between photographer and painter, between youthful Surrealist revolution and the existential introspection that marked her painting activity after World War II.

With the collaboration of the J. Paul Getty Museum and in partnership with the Tate Modern, the exhibition organized by the Centre Pompidou aims to highlight, for the first time in a French museum, Dora Maar’s work as an artist, and not only as the muse and mistress of the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. Although for many she remains the model of La femme qui pleure, Dora Maar has nevertheless recently enjoyed critical reception and recognition in studies dedicated to Surrealism and photography. Several exhibitions organized by the Musée National d’Art Moderne, “Explosante fixe” and, more recently, “La Subversion des images” and “Voici Paris”, accorded a special place to Dora Maar’s Surrealist work, with enigmatic photographs such as Portrait d’Ubu and Le Simulateur, a photomontage that joined the museum’s collections in 1973.
The donation of Simulateur was the beginning of the Centre Pompidou’s continued interest in Dora Maar’s photographic work. The 1980s and 1990s were marked by various acquisitions, culminating in 2011 with the arrival of ten prints from the Bouqueret collection. In 2004 the purchase of her studio collection, consisting of some one thousand eight hundred and ninety negatives and two hundred and eighty contact prints, made the collection preserved in the Musée National d’Art Moderne one of the largest public collections of Dora Maar’s work. The recent digitization of negatives has now rendered her work accessible to a large audience of researchers and amateurs. Dora Maar is the only artist with a large portfolio of photographs preserved in the collections – Brancusi, Brassaï, Éli Lotar, Man Ray – who has not yet been the subject of a major exhibition project. Thanks to original archives and close scientific collaboration between the curatorship teams at the Centre Pompidou and the Getty Museum, the Dora Maar retrospective traces the development of this independent artist through more than four hundred works and documents: from her first commissions for fashion and advertising as a studio photographer, to her political commitments as witnessed by her street photographs, including her Surrealist activity and her meeting with Picasso. Lastly, the exhibition shines a special spotlight on her work as a painter, an activity to which she devoted herself for nearly forty years. Like her fellow female photographers, Laure Albin Guillot, Rogi André, Nora Dumas and Germaine Krull, who were active like her between the wars, Dora Maar belongs to the generation of women who liberated themselves professionally and socially through their work as photographers, a profession that was undergoing complete renewal with the development of the illustrated press and advertising. After studying graphic art in the Comité des Dames of the Union des Arts Décoratifs, Dora Maar trained in photography in the late 1920s. Like her mentor, Emmanuel Sougez, she preferred to work in a studio and collaborated with Pierre Kéfer, a set designer for films, from 1931 to 1935. “Kéfer-Dora Maar” became the name and the official credit for the studio, figuring in prints and publications at the time, even when Dora Maar or Pierre Kéfer worked alone on projects. Kéfer’s social flair enabled them to specialise in portraits, fashion and advertising illustrations for the cosmetics sector. This exhibition accords a central position to Dora Maar, a professional photographer endowed with an inventiveness that combined great technical mastery with a dreamlike universe that was much praised by her contemporaries.Continue Reading..

03
Giu

Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies & Theatre of Metamorphoses

Museum Tinguely in Basel and Centre Pompidou-Metz present two parallel exhibitions devoted to the artist Rebecca Horn, offering complementary insights into the work of an artist who is among the most extraordinary of her generation. In the Body Fantasies show in Basel, which combines early performative works and later kinetic sculpture to highlight lines of development within her oeuvre, the focus is on transformation processes of body and machine. The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses explores in Metz the diverse theme of transformation from animist, surrealist and mechanistic perspectives, placing special emphasis on the role of film as a matrix within Horn’s work.

Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies at Museum Tinguely, Basel
Horn’s work is always inspired by the human body and its movement. In her early performative pieces of the 1960s and ’70s, this is expressed via the use of objects that serve as both extensions and constrictions of the body. Since the 1980s, her work has consisted primarily of kinetic machines and, increasingly, large-scale installations that “come alive” thanks to movement, the performing body being replaced by a mechanical actor. These processes of transformation between expanded bodies and animated machines in Horn’s oeuvre, which now spans five decades, are the focus of the Basel show.

Although in terms of materiality the mechanical constructions with their cold metal contrast starkly with Horn’s earlier body extensions made using fabric and feathers, they do pursue and develop their specific movements. The Body Fantasies exhibition juxtaposes performative works and later machine sculptures in order to follow the unfolding development of such motifs of movement. Divided up into four themes (Flapping Wings, Circulating, Inscribing, Touching) the Basel show traces the development of her works as “stations in a process of transformation” (Rebecca Horn), emphasizing this continuity in her work.

This major solo exhibition of her work—that includes body instruments and actions, films, kinetic sculptures and installations—is the first of its kind in Switzerland for more than 30 years, taking place at Museum Tinguely from June 5 to September 22, 2019.

The exhibition Body Fantasies in Basel is curated by Sandra Beate Reimann.

Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz
First major exhibition in France, after the one at the Musée des Beaux-arts de Grenoble in 1995, the show Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz follows the processes at work in Rebecca Horn’s research, from her preparatory drawings to her sculptures and installations.

The exhibition reveals in watermarks the affinities they maintain with certain figures of surrealism and their repetition and their transformation during the course of five decades of creation. Rebecca Horn perpetuates in a unique manner, the themes bequeathed to us by mythology and fairytales, such as metamorphosis into a hybrid or mythical creature, the secret life of the world of objects, the secrets of alchemy, or the fantasies of body-robots. These founding themes, which have been present in numerous currents of art history such as Mannerism or Surrealism, resonate in the exhibition. It highlights artists who have nourished her imagination, like Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Marcel Duchamp, or Jean Cocteau and whose works are matched with those of Rebecca Horn. This show is an invitation to share this discernible stage so that it becomes for the visitor-spectator “the free space of his own imagination.”

This exhibition will be taking place at Centre Pompidou-Metz from June 8 to January 13, 2020.
The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses in Metz is curated by Emma Lavigne and Alexandra Müller.

Rebecca Horn
Body Fantasies
June 5–September 22, 2019

Rebecca Horn
Theatre of Metamorphoses
June 8, 2019–January 13, 2020

Vernissage: June 4, 6:30pm
Museum Tinguely, Basel
Vernissage: June 7, 7pm
Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz

www.tinguely.ch
www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

Image: Rebecca Horn, White Body Fan, 1972. Photograph. Rebecca Horn Collection. © 2019 Rebecca Horn/ProLitteris, Zürich

16
Mag

Gina Pane. Action Psyché

“If I open my ‘body’ so that you can see your blood therein, it is for the love of you: the Other.” 
– Gina PANE, 1973

Gina Pane was instrumental to the development of the international Body Art movement, establishing a unique and corporeal language marked by ritual, symbolism and catharsis. The body, most often the artist’s own physical form, remained at the heart of her artistic practice as a tool of expression and communication until her death in 1990. Coming from the archives of the Galerie Rodolphe Stadler, the Parisian gallery of Pane who were themselves revolutionary in their presentation of avant-garde performance art, her exhibition at Richard Saltoun Gallery celebrates the artist’s pioneering career with a focus on the actions for which she is best known. It provides the most comprehensive display of the artist’s work in London since the Tate’s presentation in 2002.
Exploring universal themes such as love, pain, death, spirituality and the metaphorical power of art, Pane sought to reveal and transform the way we have been taught to experience our body in relation to the self and others. She defined the body as “a place of the pain and suffering, of cunning and hope, of despair and illusion.” Her actions strived to reconnect the forces of the subconscious with the collective memory of the human psyche, and the sacred or spiritual. In these highly choreographed events, Pane subjected herself to intense physical and mental trials, which ranged from desperately seeking to drink from a glass of milk whilst tied, breaking the glass and lapping at the shards with her mouth (Action Transfert, 1973); piercing her arm with a neat line of rose thorns (Action Sentimentale, 1973); to methodically cutting her eyelids and stomach with razor blades (Action Psyché, 1974);and boxing with herself in front of a mirror (Action Il Caso no. 2 sul ring, 1976) – all performed silently in front of gathered audiences. She interpreted the sacrifice and aestheticised risk of such actions as an expression of love for the ‘other’.
Actions were photographed by Francoise Masson, to whom Pane provided detailed diagrams and sketches to indicate the intense moments she wished to be captured on camera. By creating such pre-determined scenarios, which she referred to as constat d’action [event proof], Pane elevated the status of the photographic object beyond mere documentation. With the resulting constat, one can examine the undulating rhythm of images and the subtle shifts in narrative but also Pane’s long-lasting desire to ignite within us a curiosity as to the meaning of our existence.
At the heart of the exhibition is Pane’s 1974 work, Action Psyché, perhaps the most visionary and intense of all of her actions. The consant presented here is considered to be the most definitive manifestation of the work in terms of both its size and scale, incorporating 25 unique colour photographs, preparatory drawings and ephemera preserved in a metal case. Further highlights include Pane’s landscape actions, which reference her earlier career as a painter of colourful, hard-edge abstractions that eventually morphed into outdoor sculptures. From the late 1960s Pane began documenting her activities in natural settings, which generally involved gestures to mark and imprint the land with her body, stones or blocks of wood. Pane combined the images into storyboard-like montages that charted temporal progress but also more importantly implied the presence (and absence) of the human hand. Whilst formally quite simple, the works incorporate sophisticated elements of scale, space and repetition.

Continue Reading..

09
Mag

Jannis Kounellis

Jannis Kounellis, curated by Germano Celant, is the major retrospective dedicated to the artist following his death in 2017. Developed in collaboration with Archivio Kounellis, the project brings together more 70 works from 1958 to 2016, from both Italian and international museums, as well as from important private collections both in Italy and abroad. The show explores the artistic and exhibition history of Jannis Kounellis (Piraeus 1936–Rome 2017), establishing a dialogue between his works and the eighteenth-century spaces of Ca’ Corner della Regina.

The artist’s early works, originally exhibited between 1960 and 1966, deal with urban language. These paintings reproduce actual writings and signs from the streets of Rome. Later on, the artist transferred black letters, arrows and numbers onto white canvases, paper or other surfaces, in a language deconstruction that expresses a fragmentation of the real. From 1964 onward, Kounellis addressed subjects taken from nature, from sunsets to roses. In 1967 Kounellis’ investigation turned more radical, embracing concrete and natural elements including birds, soil, cacti, wool, coal, cotton, and fire.

Kounellis moved from a written and pictorial language to a physical and environmental one. Thus the use of organic and inorganic entities transformed his practice into corporeal experience, conceived as a sensorial transmission. In particular, the artist explored the sound dimension through which a painting is translated into sheet music to play or dance to. Already in 1960, Kounellis began chanting his letters on canvas, and in 1970 the artist included the presence of a musician or a dancer. An investigation into the olfactory, which began in 1969 with coffee, continued through the 1980s with elements like grappa, in order to escape the illusory limits of the painting and join with the virtual chaos of reality.In the installations realized toward the end of the 1960s, the artist sets up a dialectic battle between the lightness, instability and temporal nature connected with the fragility of the organic element and the heaviness, permanence, artificiality and rigidity of industrial structures, represented by modular surfaces in gray-painted metal. In the same period Kounellis participated in exhibitions that paved the way to Arte Povera, which in turn translated into an authentic form of visual expression. An approach that recalls ancient culture, interpreted according to a contemporary spirit, in contrast with the loss of historical and social identity that took place during the postwar period. Beginning in 1967, the year of the so-called “fire daisy,” the phenomenon of combustion began to appear frequently in the artist’s work: a “fire writing” that enlights the transformative and regenerative potential of flames. At the height of the mutation, according to alchemical tradition, we find gold, employed by the artist in multiple ways. In the installation Untitled (Tragedia civile) (1975), the contrast between the gold leaf that covers a bare wall and the black clothing hanging on a coat hanger underlines the dramatic nature of a scene that alludes to a personal and historical crisis. In Kounellis’ work smoke, naturally connected with fire, functions both as a residual of a pictorial process, and as proof of the passage of time. The traces of soot on stones, canvases and walls that characterize some of his works from 1979 and 1980 indicate a personal “return to painting,” in opposition to the anti-ideological and hedonistic approach employed in a large part of the painting production in the 1980s. Throughout his artistic research Kounellis develops a tragic and personal relationship with culture and history, avoiding a refined and reverential attitude. He would eventually represent the past with an incomplete collection of fragments of classical statues, as in the work from 1974. Meanwhile, in other works the Greco-Roman heritage is explored through the mask, as in the 1973 installation made up of a wooden frame on which plaster casts of faces are placed. The door is another symbol of the artist’s intolerance for the dynamics of his present. The passageways between rooms are closed up with stones, wood, sewing machines and iron reinforcing bars, making several spaces inaccessible in order to emphasize their unknown, metaphysical and surreal dimension.Continue Reading..

08
Apr

ROMAMOR di Anne et Patrick Poirier

A Villa Medici fino al 5 maggio 2019 è possibile visitare la prima mostra monografica di Anne e Patrick Poirier in Italia, ROMAMOR. A cura di Chiara Parisi, la mostra chiude l’ambizioso programma espositivo ideata da Muriel Mayette-Holtz – direttrice dal 2015 al 2018 – che ha visto alternarsi grandi nomi dal 2017, tra cui Annette Messager, Yoko Ono e Claire Tabouret, Elizabeth Peyton e Camille Claudel, Tatiana Trouvé e Katharina Grosse, senza dimenticare i numerosi artisti internazionali che hanno partecipato alla mostra nei giardini, Ouvert la Nuit. A questi progetti si sono affiancate le due grandi mostre dedicate ai pensionnaires, al crocevia tra ricerca e produzione, Swimming is Saving e Take Me (I’m yours).

Anne e Patrick Poirier sono tra le coppie francesi più celebri della scena artistica internazionale: una simbiosi creativa che ha preso corpo proprio a Villa Medici, cinquanta anni fa. Il trascorrere del tempo, le tracce e le cicatrici del suo passaggio, la fragilità delle costruzioni umane e la potenza delle rovine, antiche come contemporanee, sono la fonte cui attinge la loro creatività, assumendo le sembianze d’una archeologia permeata di malinconia e di gioco. Anne è nata nel 1941 a Marsiglia; Patrick nel 1942 a Nantes. Il loro lavoro è caratterizzato dall’impronta di violenza lasciata dall’epoca che hanno vissuto – loro che, sin dalla più tenera infanzia, si sono confrontati con la guerra e con i suoi paesaggi devastati. Nel 1943, Anne assiste ai bombardamenti del porto di Marsiglia, e Patrick perde suo padre durante la distruzione del centro storico di Nantes.

Vincitori del Grand Prix de Rome nel 1967, dopo aver frequentato l’École des arts décoratifs di Parigi, Anne e Patrick soggiornano a Villa Medici dal 1968 al 1972 – invitati da Balthus. Ed è proprio a Villa Medici che decidono di unire la loro visione artistica, firmando congiuntamente i lavori. Anne e Patrick Poirier appartengono a quella generazione di artisti che, viaggiando e aprendosi al mondo fin dagli anni Sessanta, sviluppa una fascinazione per le città e le civiltà antiche e, in particolare, i processi della loro scomparsa. In linea con questa sensibilità: città misteriose, ricostruzioni archeologiche immaginarie, fascino delle rovine, indagine di giardini, unione di opere storiche e produzioni in situ, sono gli elementi che danno vita alla mostra ROMAMOR a Villa Medici. La loro prima grande opera comune (1969), un plastico in terracotta di Ostia Antica, nasce dal ricordo delle varie peregrinazioni nell’antico porto romano, eletta dagli artisti terreno di scavi per eccellenza. Da allora, il proposito di ritrovare le tracce di una storia remota, li condurrà spesso a esperire l’assenza, la perdita delle architetture, dei segni e dell’eredità delle civiltà.

“Passiamo dall’ombra alla luce, alternativamente, dal nero al bianco, dall’ordine al caos, dalla rovina alla costruzione utopica, dal passato al futuro, e dalla introspezione alla proiezione. La duplice identità del nostro binomio di architetti-archeologi è ciò che consente questa erranza tra universi apparentemente lontani tra loro, dei quali cerchiamo le relazioni nascoste”, secondo le parole degli artisti. A Villa Medici, la mostra si apre con una La Palissade/Scavi in corso (2019) che conduce lo spettatore nello spazio della Cisterna offrendogli la visione di una monumentale maquette di rovine, Finis Terrae (2019) illuminate da una scritta Un monde qui se fait sauter lui-même ne permet plus qu’on lui fasse le portrait (2001). Permeato da queste prime visioni, lo spettatore entra nella prima sala con la presenza magica di una scultura luminosa, Le monde à l’envers (2019), costruita a partire di un globo terrestre e costellazioni, che confluisce in un autoritratto degli artisti sotto forma di Giano Bifronte, dio dell’inizio e della fine, rivolto al futuro sempre con un occhio al passato. Un’opera ambivalente, manifesto della mostra, da leggere come contrappunto all’arazzo Palmyre (2018), sulla devastazione del sito siriano da parte dell’Isis nel 2015. Lo spettatore prosegue trovando, al centro della sala successiva, L’incendie de la grande bibliothèque (1976), opera fondamentale degli artisti, realizzata a carbone, metafora architettonica della memoria, della mente umana e del suo funzionamento. A metà tra catastrofe e utopia, tra storia e mito, quest’opera pone lo spettatore di fronte al senso di fragilità caratteristico delle opere di Anne e Patrick Poirier. Ouranopolis (1995), ovvero la “città celeste”, occupa la sala successiva. “Dall’esterno, quasi nulla si vede”: sospesa al soffitto, la scultura consente di intravedere attraverso minuscoli fori, uno spazio interno che conta quaranta sale. Anne e Patrick parlano dell’amore che nutrono per le biblioteche, intese come metafore della memoria; un’attrazione che li conduce a creare dei musei-biblioteche ideali, in questo caso un edificio ellittico che sembra poter volare verso nuovi mondi, trasportando lontano il suo carico di immagini di fronte a una possibile catastrofe imminente. Lo spazio onirico che lo spettatore intravede dagli oblò si sviluppa, lungo la grande scalinata delle antiche scuderie di Villa Medici, catapultandolo all’interno di una “irrealtà inquietante”. Uno spazio luminoso, Le songe de Jacob (2019), composto da nomi di costellazioni, scale fosforescenti, forme serpentine sospese, piume bianche sparse sulla scalinata accompagnano il passo dello spettatore, gradino dopo gradino, sino a raggiungere lo spazio successivo, di immacolato candore, dove appare Rétrovisions(2018), autoritratto tridimensionale della coppia che si riflette in uno specchio, circondata da parole al neon che parlando di utopia, illuminano lo spazio, abbagliandoci. Poco lontano, Surprise Party (1996): un mappamondo sgonfio e sbiadito poggiato su un vecchio giradischi crepitante, a sua volta posato su una vecchia valigia – altro elemento chiave del vocabolario dei Poirier – che evoca una geografia nomade, “un mondo che gira al contrario. Una terra che stride”. Tra vertigini e vestigia, lo spettatore si trova di fronte a Dépôt de mémoire et d’oubli(1989): una croce che svetta, fatta di impronte lasciate sulla carta di maschere di dei antichi. Con l’opera Lost Archetypes (1979), lo sguardo si trova davanti alla ricostruzione in scala umana di grandi opere architettoniche: una serie di quattro plastici bianchi di siti in rovina. Tra passato, presente e futuro, caduta, costruzione ed elevazione, Anne e Patrick Poirier fanno vacillare i punti di riferimento storici del pubblico romano. Nella sala successiva, i collages: disegni vegetali fissati nella cera, Journal d’Ouranopolis (1995), un tentativo di lottare contro la privazione della memoria e dell’oblio. La sensazione di vulnerabilità, che presiede alla distruzione del nostro mondo, si ritrova nelle immagini di Fragility e Ruins (1996). La mostra si estende al giardino di Villa Medici: nel Piazzale, gli artisti disegnano con delle pietre di marmo di Carrara, la forma di un cervello umano, Le Labyrinthe du Cerveau (2019), con i suoi due emisferi. Un “manifesto autobiografico bicefalo”, che raffigura la congiunzione delle loro menti, metafora di una pratica di coppia che rievoca la tematica da loro esplorata negli ultimi cinquant’anni: i meccanismi legati al passare del tempo. Le loro costruzioni sono come grandi cervelli, paesaggio che bisogna percorrere. Amano dire, a questo proposito: “L’immagine del cervello, fatto di due emisferi, è ciò che meglio può rappresentarci; rappresentare contemporaneamente l’unità e la diversità della simbiosi che siamo”. Il visitatore continua la sua passeggiata immaginando di prendere una pausa nella monumentale sedia in granito, Siège Mesopotamia (2012-15) che troneggia nel giardino. Poco lontano, nella Fontana dell’obelisco, si intravede Regard des Statues (2019): anonimi occhi in gesso ci appaiono deformati dall’acqua in cui sono immersi. L’occhio che guarda il cielo, il tempo, l’occhio del ricordo e dell’oblio, l’occhio della storia e della violenza, conduce lo spettatore all’Atelier Balthus, dove emerge un’opera mitica, realizzata proprio a Villa Medici nel 1971: stele di carta, costruite a partire dai calchi delle Erme – le figure in marmo che costellano i viali del giardino della Villa – accompagnate da libri-erbari, “quaderni che recano annotazioni personali e disegni”, e medaglioni di porcellana su cui sono raffigurate le stesse immagini funebri. La parola che dà nome alla mostra, ROMAMOR (2019), appare in neon nel portico dell’Atelier Balthus in omaggio a questa città così importante da un punto di vista artistico e umano per i due artisti.Continue Reading..

29
Mar

Jenny Holzer: Thing Indescribable

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jenny Holzer: Thing Indescribable, a survey of work by one of the most outstanding artists of our time. Sponsored by the Fundación BBVA, this exhibition features new works, including a series of light projections on the facade of the museum, which can be viewed each night from March 21 to March 30. Holzer’s work has been part of the museum’s fabric since its beginnings, in the form of the imposing Installation for Bilbao (1997). Installed in the atrium, the work—commissioned for the museum’s opening—is made up of nine luminous columns, each more than 12 meters high. Since last year, this site-specific work has been complemented by Arno Pair (2010), a set of engraved stone benches gifted to the museum by the artist.

The reflections, ideas, arguments, and sorrows that Holzer has articulated over a career of more than 40 years will be presented in a variety of distinct installations, each with an evocative social dimension. Her medium—whether emblazoned on a T-shirt, a plaque, a painting, or an LED sign—is language. Distributing text in public space is an integral aspect of her work, starting in the 1970s with posters covertly pasted throughout New York City and continuing in her more recent light projections onto landscape and architecture.

Visitors to this exhibition will experience the evolving scope of the artist’s practice, which addresses the fundamental themes of human existence—including power, violence, belief, memory, love, sex, and killing. Her art speaks to a broad and ever-changing public through unflinching, concise, and incisive language. Holzer’s aim is to engage the viewer by creating evocative spaces that invite a reaction, a thought, or the taking of a stand, leaving the sometimes anonymous artist in the background.

Jenny Holzer
Thing Indescribable
March 22–September 9, 2019

Guggenheim Bilbao
Abandoibarra et.2
48001 Bilbao
Spain

jennyholzer.guggenheim-bilbao.eus

Curated by: Petra Joos, curator of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Image: Jenny Holzer, Survival, 1989

28
Mar

Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth (Né altra Né questa: La sfida al Labirinto) is the title of the exhibition for the Italian Pavilion at the 58th Venice Biennale, curated by Milovan Farronato and featuring work by Enrico David (Ancona, 1966), Chiara Fumai (Rome, 1978–Bari, 2017) and Liliana Moro (Milan, 1961).

The subtitle of the project alludes to La sfida al labirinto (The Challenge to the Labyrinth), a seminal essay written by Italo Calvino in 1962 that has been the inspiration for Neither Nor. In this text the author proposed a cultural work open to all possible languages and that felt itself co-responsible in the construction of a world which, having lost its traditional points of reference, no longer asked to be simply represented. To visualize the intricate forms of contemporary reality, Calvino turned to the vivid metaphor of the labyrinth: an apparent maze of lines and tendencies that is in reality constructed on the basis of strict rules.

Interpreting this line of thought in an artistic context, Neither Nor—whose Italian title, Né altra Né questa, already uses the rhetorical figure of the anastrophe to disorientate—gives agency to a project of ‘challenge to the labyrinth’ that takes Calvino’s lesson on board by staging an exhibition whose layout is not linear and cannot be reduced to a set of tidy and predictable trajectories. Many generous journeys and interpretations are offered to the public, whom the exhibition entrusts with the chance to take on an active role in determining the route they will take and thereby find themselves confronted with the result of their own choices, accepting doubt and uncertainty as inescapable parts of understanding.

The exhibition is accompanied by a Public Program including talks by Enrico David, Liliana Moro and Prof. Marco Pasi, as well as the presentation of Bustrofedico (“Boustrophedon”), a new experimental short film by Italian filmmaker Anna Franceschini documenting the exhibition, produced by In Between Art Film and Gluck50, to be premiered in Venice at the end of the show. The Educational Program, promoted by the Directorate-General for Contemporary Art and Architecture and Urban Peripheries (DGAAP) of the Ministry for the Cultural Heritage and Activities, invites participants to collectively study and perform a choreography conceived by Christodoulos Panayiotou (Limassol, Cyprus, 1978), inspired by the ‘Dance of the Cranes’ which, according to the ancient Greek poet Callimachus, celebrated Theseus’s escape from the Labyrinth of Knossos. The Programs are curated by Milovan Farronato, Stella Bottai and Lavinia Filippi, and will be held in the spaces of the Italian Pavilion.

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth will be accompanied by a bilingual catalogue published by Humboldt Books, with essays by Stella Bottai, Italo Calvino, Enrico David, Milovan Farronato, Lavinia Filippi, Chiara Fumai, Liliana Moro, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Emanuele Trevi.

The Italian Pavilion is realized also with the support of Gucci and FPT Industrial, main sponsors of the exhibition, and the contribution of the main donor Nicoletta Fiorucci Russo. Special thanks also go to all the other donors for their fundamental contributions to the project; we are grateful as well to the technical sponsors Gemmo, C&C-Milano and Select Aperitivo.

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth
Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale
May 11–November 24, 2019

Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale
Arsenale
Venice
Italy

www.neithernor.it

Commissioned by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Activities
DGAAP – Directorate-General for Contemporary Art and Architecture Urban Peripheries
Commissioner: Federica Galloni, Director General DGAAP

Curated by Milovan Farronato

source: e-flux

26
Mar

La ferita della bellezza. Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina

Alberto Burri, chiamato a realizzare un intervento per la ricostruzione del paese distrutto dal terremoto nella Valle del Belice del 1968, decide di intervenire sulle macerie della città di Gibellina, creando l’opera di Land Art più grande al mondo. Le ricopre di un sudario bianco, di un’enorme gettata di cemento che ingloba i resti e riveste, in parte ricalcandola, la planimetria della vecchia Gibellina. Culmine del percorso interpretativo sono le fotografie in bianco e nero di Aurelio Amendola sul Grande Cretto. Fotografo che per eccellenza ha raccolto le immagini di Burri, dei suoi lavori e dei processi creativi, Amendola ha realizzato gli scatti in due riprese, nel 2011 e nel 2018, a completamento avvenuto dell’opera (2015).

Nel percorso inoltre, il video di Petra Noordkamp – prodotto e presentato nel 2015 dal Guggenheim Museum di New York, in occasione della grande retrospettiva The Trauma of Painting –  filma in un racconto poetico e di grande sapienza tecnica l’opera di Burri e il paesaggio circostante.

Alcune opere uniche dell’artista, veri e propri capolavori, inoltre, estendono non solo ai Cretti ma anche ai Sacchi, ai Legni, ai Catrami, alle Plastiche e a una selezione di opere grafiche la lettura proposta dal celebre psicanalista.
È una ferita che è dappertutto, che trema ovunque. Una scossa, un tormento, un precipitare di fessurazioni infinite ed ingovernabili.

Come scrive Recalcati in Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina, nei Legni la ferita è generata dal fuoco e dalla carbonizzazione del materiale ma, soprattutto, dal resto che sopravvive alla bruciatura. Nelle Combustioni, lo sgretolamento della materia, la manifestazione della sua umanissima friabilità, della sua più radicale vulnerabilità, viene restituita con grande equilibrio poetico e formale. È ciò che avviene anche con le Plastiche dove, ancora una volta, è sempre l’uso del fuoco a infliggere su di una materia debole ed inconsistente come la plastica, l’ustione della vita e della morte.

In occasione della mostra, realizzato dalla casa editrice Magonza un importante volume stampato su carta di pregio e di grande formato con testimonianze e ricerche inedite su Alberto Burri, la sua opera e Il Grande Cretto di Gibellina. Un nuovo testo di Massimo Recalcati raccoglie gli sviluppi ulteriori della sua ricerca, insieme a interventi di storici dell’arte quali Gianfranco Maraniello e Aldo Iori.

Organizzata una conferenza ad hoc tenuta da Massimo Recalcati, un’occasione di una riflessione ampia sull’opera di Alberto Burri e sulla mostra.

La ferita della bellezza. Alberto Burri e il Grande Cretto di Gibellina
Museo Carlo Bilotti Aranciera di Villa Borghese
dal 23 marzo al 9 giugno 2019

nei seguenti orari: dal 23 marzo al 31 maggio 2019
da martedì a venerdì e festivi (lunedì di Pasqua) ore 10.00 – 16.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 15.30)
sabato e domenica ore 10.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30).
Giorni di chiusura: lunedì e 1 maggio

dal 1 al 9 giugno 2019
da martedì a venerdì e festivi ore 13.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30)
sabato e domenica ore 10.00 – 19.00 (ingresso consentito fino alle 18.30)
Giorni di chiusura: lunedì

*****************************

Progetto espositivo itinerante. Dopo la tappa romana l’esposizione riallestita da giugno 2019 ad ottobre 2019 al MAG Museo Alto Garda a Riva del Garda in collaborazione con il MART Museo di Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto.

Ingresso gratuito

Tel 060608 (tutti i giorni ore 9.00 – 19.00)
Promossa da Roma Capitale, Assessorato alla Crescita culturale – Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali
con un prestito della Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna di Roma
A cura di Massimo Recalcati con il coordinamento scientifico di Alessandro Sarteanesi
Servizi museali Zètema Progetto Cultura
Prodotta da Magonza editore (www.magonzaeditore.it)
Con il patrocinio di Regione Lazio, Regione Sicilia, Comune di Gibellina, Fondazione Palazzo Albizzini Collezione Burri, Fondazione Orestiadi con un  prestito della Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna di Roma
Con il sostegno di Broker ufficiale; PL Ferrari; A Member of the Lockton Group of Companies
25
Mar

Surrealist Lee Miller

Preferisco fare una foto, che essere una foto”.
Lee Miller

Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea sono lieti di presentare la mostra “Surrealist Lee Miller”, la prima italiana della retrospettiva dedicata ad una delle fotografe più importanti del Novecento. Lanciata da Condé Nast, sulla copertina di Vogue nel 1927, Lee Miller fin da subito diventa una delle modelle più apprezzate e richieste dalle riviste di moda. Molti i fotografi che la ritraggono – Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Huene o Arnold Genthe – e innumerevoli i servizi fotografici di cui è stata protagonista, fino a quando – all’incirca due anni più tardi – la Miller non decide di passare dall’altra parte dell’obiettivo. Donna caparbia e intraprendente, rimane colpita profondamente dalle immagini del fotografo più importante dell’epoca, Man Ray, che riesce ad incontrare diventandone modella e musa ispiratrice. Ma, cosa più importante, instaura con lui un duraturo sodalizio artistico e professionale che assieme li porterà a sviluppare la tecnica della solarizzazione. Amica di Picasso, di Ernst, Cocteau, Mirò e di tutta la cerchia dei surrealisti, Miller in questi anni apre a Parigi il suo primo studio diventando nota come ritrattista e fotografa di moda, anche se il nucleo più importante di opere in questo periodo è certamente rappresentato dalle immagini surrealiste, molte delle quali erroneamente attribuite a Man Ray. A questo corpus appartengono le celebri Nude bent forward, Condom e Tanja Ramm under a bell jar, opere presenti in mostra, accanto ad altri celebri scatti che mostrano appieno come il percorso artistico di Lee Miller sia stato, non solo autonomo, ma tecnicamente maturo e concettualmente sofisticato. Dopo questa prima parentesi formativa, nel 1932 Miller decide di tornare a New York per aprire un nuovo studio fotografico che, nonostante il successo, chiude due anni più tardi quando per seguire il marito – il ricco uomo d’affari egiziano Aziz Eloui Bey – si trasferisce al Cairo.  Intraprende lunghi viaggi nel deserto e fotografa villaggi e rovine, iniziando a confrontarsi con la fotografia di reportage, un genere che Lee Miller porta avanti anche negli anni successivi quando, insieme a Roland Penrose – l’artista surrealista che sarebbe diventato il suo secondo marito – viaggia sia nel sud che nell’est europeo. Poco prima dello scoppio della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, nel 1939, lascia l’Egitto per trasferirsi a Londra, ed ignorando gli ordini dall’ambasciata americana di tornare in patria, inizia a lavorare come fotografa freelance per Vogue. Documenta gli incessanti bombardamenti su Londra ma il suo contributo più importante arriverà nel 1944 quando è corrispondente accreditata al seguito delle truppe americane e collaboratrice del fotografo David E. Scherman per le riviste “Life” e “Time”.  Fu lei l’unica fotografa donna a seguire gli alleati durante il D-Day, a documentare le attività al fronte a durante la liberazione.
Le sue fotografie ci testimoniano in modo vivido e mai didascalico l’assedio di St. Malo, la Liberazione di Parigi, i combattimenti in Lussemburgo e in Alsazia e, inoltre, la liberazione dei campi di concentramento di Dachau e Buchenwald. È proprio in questi giorni febbrili che viene fatta la scoperta degli appartamenti di Hitler a Monaco di Baviera ed è qui che scatta quella che probabilmente è la sua fotografia più celebre: l’autoritratto nella vasca da bagno del Führer. Dopo la guerra Lee Miller ha continuato a scattare per Vogue per altri due anni, occupandosi di moda e celebrità, ma lo stress post traumatico riportato in seguito alla permanenza al fronte contribuì al suo lento ritirarsi dalla scena artistica, anche se il suo apporto alle biografie scritte da Penrose su Picasso, Mirò, Man Ray e Tapies fu fondamentale, sia come apparato fotografico che aneddotico.
La mostra (14 marzo – 9 giugno 2019), organizzata da Palazzo Pallavicini e curata da ONO arte contemporanea, si compone di 101 fotografie che ripercorrono l’intera carriera artistica della fotografa, attraverso quelli che sono i suoi scatti più famosi ed iconici, compresa la sessione realizzata negli appartamenti di Hitler, raramente esposte anche a livello internazionale e mai diffuse a mezzo stampa per l’uso improprio fattone negli anni da gruppi neonazisti.Per ulteriori informazioni sull’archivio Lee Miller www.leemiller.co.uk

Palazzo Pallavicini
via San Felice, 24 – Bologna

Surrealist Lee Miller
dal 14 marzo al 9 giugno 2019

ORARI: Da giovedì a domenica: 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso). Chiuso il lunedì, martedì e mercoledì. Aperture straordinarie: 22 e 25 aprile 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 1 maggio 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 2 giugno 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso)

ENTI PROMOTORI: Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea

INFO: +39 3313471504 – info@palazzopallavicini.com

Image: Charlie Chaplin by Lee Miller © Lee Miller Archives England 2018. All Rights Reserved

 

20
Mar

Miart 2019

A Milano dal 5 al 7 aprile 2019 torna miart, la fiera internazionale d’arte moderna e contemporanea organizzata da Fiera Milano e diretta per il terzo anno da Alessandro Rabottini. 186 gallerie provenienti da 19 paesi esporranno opere di maestri moderni, artisti contemporanei affermati ed emergenti e designer storicizzati e sperimentali. In occasione di miart 2019, fiera internazionale d’arte moderna e contemporanea organizzata da Fiera Milano, una nuova edizione della Milano Art Week coinvolgerà visitatori, collezionisti e professionisti.

Concepita da miart in collaborazione con il Comune di Milano, la Milano Art Week conferma lo status di capitale culturale e creativa di Milano mettendo in scena una gamma incredibilmente diversificata di posizioni artistiche – sia storiche sia contemporanee – attraverso nuove commissioni artistiche, mostre monografiche e collettive tematiche. A partire dal 1 aprile, ogni giornata della Milano Art Week ospiterà opening e visite straordinarie presso mostre e progetti artistici tra cui, fra gli altri:

– Sheela Gowda, a cura di Nuria Enguita e Lucia Aspesi; Giorgio Andreotta Calò, a cura di Roberta Tenconi presso Pirelli HangarBicocca
– Lizzie Fitch / Ryan Trecartin presso Fondazione Prada
– Ibrahim Mahama alla Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, a cura di Massimiliano Gioni
– Anna Maria Maiolino presso PAC – Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea, a cura di Diego Sileo
– XXII Triennale di Milano. Broken Nature: Design Takes on Human Survival a cura di Paola Antonelli presso La Triennale di Milano
– Lygia Pape alla Fondazione Carriero, a cura di Francesco Stocchi
The Unexpected Subject. 1978 Art and Feminism in Italy presso FM – Centro per l’Arte Contemporanea, a cura di Marco Scotini e Raffaella Perna
– Renata Boero, a cura di Anna Daneri e Iolanda Ratti; Marinella Pirelli, a cura di Lucia Aspesi e Iolanda Ratti al Museo del Novecento
– Antonello da Messina, a cura di Giovanni Carlo Federico Villa; Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, a cura di Florence Viguier a Palazzo Reale
– Carlos Amorales alla Fondazione Adolfo Pini, a cura di Gabi Scardi
– Sophia Al-Maria presso Fondazione Arnaldo Pomodoro, a cura di Cloé Perrone
– Jamie Diamond presso Osservatorio Fondazione Prada, a cura di Melissa Harris
– Morbelli (1853-1919) alla GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, a cura di Paola Zatti
Hyper Visuality. Film & Video Art from the Wemhöner Collection a Palazzo Dugnani e curata da Philipp Bollmann
– Hans Josephsohn presso ICA, a cura di Alberto Salvadori
– Anj Smith presso il Museo Poldi Pezzoli
The Last Supper After Leonardo alla Fondazione Stelline e curata da Demetrio Paparoni

La Milano Art Week porterà in scena anche la performance attraverso alcune prestigiose commissioni, fra cui mk e Linda Fregni Nagler presso Triennale Teatro dell’Arte e Anna Maria Maiolino al PAC – Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea.

La Milano Art Week 2019 culminerà con la Art Night di sabato 6 aprile – una serata di inaugurazioni e performance diffuse nei numerosi spazi non profit e di sperimentazione della città – e con l’ apertura straordinaria delle gallerie milanesi prevista per domenica 7.

miart vi aspetta a Milano dal 5 al 7 aprile 2019 (con anteprima VIP il 4 aprile)!

Main Partner : Intesa Sanpaolo – Intesa Sanpaolo Private Banking
Partner : Herno, Fidenza Village, Snaporazverein, LCA Studio Legale
miartalks powered by : In Between Art Film
Sponsor : Ruinart, Flos, Nava press
Media Partner : Elle Decor
International Media Partner: The New York Times
Official Guide : My Art Guides
Online exclusively on : Artsy

La campagna visiva Horizon è un racconto per immagini dal sapore cinematografico che celebra il tema dell’arte come luogo di esplorazione, scoperta e mutamento.

Horizon è stata realizzata da:
fotografo Jonathan Frantini
Art Direction di Francesco Valtolina per Mousse
Assistente Art Direction: Anita Poltronieri (Mousse)
Assistente fotografo: Francesca Gardini, Giacomo Lepori
Casting: Semina Casting
Modelli: Amelie, Lorenzo, Clara, Federico, Alessandro, Mohamed, Sara, Angela, Martina, Alessandro, Nicolo’, Davide, Loreley, Mehdi