Category: fotografia

10
Ott

Musja. The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?

Christian Boltanski, Monica Bonvicini, Monster Chetwynd, Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Sheela Gowda, James Lee Byars, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Gregor Schneider, Chiharu Shiota

Curated by Danilo Eccher

Musja, the exhibition space in via dei Chiavari 7 in Rome presided over by Ovidio Jacorossi, becomes a private museum with the opening on October 9 of Who is afraid of the Dark?, the first exhibition within The Dark Side project, a three year programme curated by Danilo Eccher.

The vast art collection owned by Jacorossi, covering the period from the early 19th century Italian to the present, will be flanked by the most innovative contemporary trends in the international panorama in order to highlight the fundamental contribution of art to personal and collective growth. The new museum also sets out to become established as a focus for the development of civil society in Rome, and to carry forward cultural commitment, and dialogue with international public and private institutions and museums.

The complex thematic setting of The Dark Side project is organized into three exhibitions spread over three years, and dedicated to: “Fear of the Dark,” “Fear of Solitude,” and “Fear of Time.” The first event in the new exhibition programme—“Fear of the Dark”—brings together 13 of the most important international artists with large site-specific installations and large-scale artworks by established artists, such as Gregor Schneider, Robert Longo, Hermann Nitsch, Tony Oursler, Christian Boltanski, James Lee Byars as well as new protagonists on the contemporary art scene such as Monster Chetwynd, Sheela Gowda, and Chiharu Shiota. There is a substantial Italian component with works and installations by Gino De Dominicis, Gianni Dessì, Flavio Favelli, Monica Bonvicini. During the opening of the exhibition, and thereafter at monthly intervals, there will be a performance by “Differenziale Femminile,” a group of four actresses, in the rooms of the gallery.

The majority of the site-specific works will be produced especially for the exhibition, while others are loans from various institutions, galleries and some others are part of the Jacorossi collection. All of them were selected for their power to draw the viewer in and encourage reflection on the topic while, at the same time, introducing some essential aspects of current contemporary art research. Visitors will be able to analyse their own reactions to sensory and tactile experiences, theatrical and magical visions, rituals and settings, anxieties that take different and unexpected forms only to melt away.

The catalogue accompanying the exhibition, published by Silvana Editoriale, contains a wealth of images by all the participating artists as well as written contributions. In addition to Danilo Eccher’s contribution, there are also some intellectually complex views on the theme of the dark by theologian Gianfranco Ravasi, theoretical physicist Mario Rasetti, psychiatrist Eugenio Borgna and philosopher Federico Vercellone. Different points of view, cross-cutting approaches, intellectual fields that diverge, overlap and are interwoven, give the project much greater scope than a standard art exhibition.

In the course of the exhibition, Musja will also be holding a series of meetings on the theme, coordinated by Federico Vercellone, professor of Aesthetics in the Department of Philosophy at Turin University.

The Dark Side – Who is afraid of the Dark?
October 9, 2019–March 1, 2020

Musja
via dei Chiavari 7
Rome
Italy

Image artwork by Gino De Dominicis, Jacorossi collection

16
Set

Andrei Tarkovsky – The Exhibition

With associative films rich in imagery, such as Andrei Rublev (1966), Solaris (1972), The Mirror (1974) and especially Stalker (1979), Andrei Tarkovsky (1932‒1986) made his name as a leading innovator of the language of cinema. This autumn, Eye presents an exhibition and film programme devoted to the celebrated filmmaker and mystic, focusing specifically on Tarkovsky’s quest for existential truth. In addition to immersing the visitor in Tarkovsky’s imagery, the exhibition includes unique documents — letters, photos and Polaroids — that have never previously been displayed in the Netherlands. Moreover, the accompanying film programme features digitally restored films.

The work of Andrei Tarkovsky weaves together dreams and memories, past and present. The painterly beauty of his images, his metaphysical reflections on humanity, and his lucid observations about cinema still inspire new generations of filmmakers and artists. Filmmakers such as Béla Tarr and Alexander Sokurov are considered his most direct descendants in the world of film.

inner voice, personal visual idiom
Beyond the straitjacket of social-realist Soviet cinema, Tarkovsky developed a unique body of work in which he saw life as a spiritual quest for truth and self-knowledge. He called it the ‘inner voice of humankind’, which could only be heard within range of the magical and transcendental. He saw his films as ‘hieroglyphics of absolute truth’, acts of non-rational creation that, more than analytical science, were capable of revealing existential meaning.

For Tarkovsky, who died in 1986, film was the ideal medium for getting close to ‘real’ life. Of all the arts, film comes closest to the laws and patterns of human thought and life, he contended — and that made it the most truthful form of art. The style of Tarkovsky’s films was determined by extremely long takes, a very slowly moving camera, remarkable use of sound and music, and an alternation of coloured and monochrome sequences.

exhibition concept

The exhibition has been conceived to get as close as possible to Tarkovsky and his work. That is why it will immerse visitors in the director’s imagery, intoxicating them, as it were, with numerous precisely chosen fragments from his films. This approach follows the ideas of the filmmaker regarding the ‘poetry of the image’ and the necessity of a ‘poetic logic’ and a ‘poetic montage’.

private memories

Especially unique is the collection of Polaroids and photographs – never previously shown in the Netherlands – made by Tarkovsky in a private capacity and while filming. The exhibition will also include material from Tarkovsky’s private archives, including letters, scripts and other documents that have never before been presented. These mementos of Tarkovsky’s personal and professional life have been made available by Tarkovsky’s son Andrei Andrejevich Tarkovsky.

film programme

The accompanying programme features Tarkovsky’s entire body of work, mostly in the form of digital restorations, including The Mirror (1974), Solaris (1972),  and his last film, The Sacrifice (1986). Also included are films by directors who inspired Tarkovsky (Sergei Parajanov, Robert Bresson) and by directors who Tarkovsky inspired (Lars von Trier, Alex Garland). Six of Tarkovsky’s films will be distributed nationally by Eye.

For those interested in Russia’s Soviet past, a six-part lecture series is being organized in collaboration with Russia expert Otto Boelen from Leiden University.

The art magazine Kunstschrift will publish a special issue devoted to Tarkovsky.

Founded in 2012, Eye Filmmuseum in Amsterdam was based on the former Dutch Cinematheque and focuses its exhibition programme on the intersection between film and visual arts. Eye explores the interplay between film and visual arts and vice versa. Recent exhibitions have been organised with artists and filmmakers such as William Kentridge, Ryoji Ikeda, Jesper Just, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, João Gusmão & Pedro Paiva, Anthony McCall, Jan Svankmajer and many others.

Andrei Tarkovsky – The Exhibition
Curated by Jaap Guldemond, in collaboration with Marente Bloemheuvel.
Exhibition, films, talks & events
September 14–December 6, 2019

Eye Filmmuseum
IJpromenade 1
1031 KT Amsterdam
The Netherlands

Image: Stalker, 1976, Andrei Tarkovsky

20
Ago

MARIA LAI. Tenendo per mano il sole

Giocavo con grande serietà e ad a un certo punto i miei giochi li hanno chiamati arte – Maria Lai
www.maxxi.art#MariaLai

In occasione del centenario della nascita, il MAXXI dedica una grande mostra a Maria Lai. Esposti oltre 200 lavori che restituiscono una biografia complessa e affascinante e un approccio alla creatività libero e privo di pregiudizi. Si intitola Tenendo per mano il sole la grande mostra che il MAXXI Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo dedica a Maria Lai (1919 – 2013), una tra le voci più singolari dell’arte italiana contemporanea. Artista dalla straordinaria capacità generativa, in anticipo su ricerche artistiche che saranno sviluppate solo successivamente, Lai ha saputo creare un linguaggio differente e originale, pur consapevole del lungo processo di decantazione che la sua arte avrebbe dovuto attraversare per essere riconosciuta. Oggi quel processo sembra essersi compiuto. Negli ultimi anni molte sono state le iniziative a lei dedicate e i suoi lavori sono stati recentemente esposti a Documenta 14 e alla Biennale di Venezia 2017. “Nel 2019 – indica Giovanna Melandri, Presidente della Fondazione MAXXI – abbiamo scelto di rivolgere particolare attenzione alle visioni artistiche femminili e non poteva, dunque, mancare un progetto legato a Maria Lai. Con questa mostra, infatti, rendiamo un tributo alla figura ed all’opera di una donna che ha saputo interpretare nel corso della sua carriera artistica infiniti linguaggi, sempre però nel solco della sua ricerca: rappresentare e reinventare con delicatezza e poesia tradizioni e simboli di una cultura arcaica, eterna e rivolgersi con forza ed immediatezza ai contemporanei”. La retrospettiva al MAXXI si concentra su ciò che viene definito il suo secondo periodo, ovvero sulle opere che l’artista crea a partire dagli anni Sessanta e che ricomincia ad esporre, dopo una lunga assenza dalla scena pubblica e artistica, solo nel 1971. “Questo perché – sottolinea Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, Direttore MAXXI Arte – è proprio da quel momento, sino alla sua scomparsa nel 2013, che sono presenti nel lavoro di Maria Lai, in maniera più evidente, molte delle istanze che ne fanno oggi un’artista estremamente attuale e che permettono di restituire alla sua figura una posizione centrale nella storia dell’arterecente”.

La mostra, a cura di Bartolomeo Pietromarchi e Luigia Lonardelli, è realizzata in collaborazione con Archivio Maria Lai eFondazione Stazione dell’Arte, con il patrocinio del Comune di Ulassai e il sostegno di Fondazione di Sardegna. Esposti oltre 200 lavori, tra cui Libri cuciti, sculture, Geografie, opere pubbliche e i suoi celebri Telai, per raccontare nel modo più completo possibile la personalità di Maria Lai e i diversi aspetti del suo lavoro. In mostra anche alcune opere recentemente entrate a far parte della Collezione del MAXXI: Terra, 1984; Il viaggiatore astrale, 1989; Bisbigli, 1996; Pagina cucita, 1978 e Senza titolo, 2009, una rara Geografia su acetato in corso didonazione.

La mostra
Tenendo per mano il sole è il titolo della mostra e della prima Fiaba cucita realizzata. Sia nel titolo che nell’opera sono presenti molti degli elementi tipici della ricerca di Lai: il suo interesse per la poesia, il linguaggio e la parola; la cosmogonia delle sue geografie evocata dal sole; la vocazione pedagogica del “tenere per mano”. Non una classica retrospettiva, ma piuttosto un racconto che non si attiene a vincoli puramente cronologici e asseconda un percorso biografico e artistico peculiare, caratterizzato da discorsi e intuizioni apparentemente lasciati in sospeso per poi essere ripresi molti anni più tardi.

Attraverso un’ampia selezione di opere, in buona parte inedite, la mostra presenta il poliedrico mondo di Maria Lai e la fitta stratificazione di idee e suggestioni che ha caratterizzato il suo immaginario. Il percorso si snoda attraverso cinque sezioni, che prendono il nome da citazioni o titoli di opere di Lai, mentre nel sottotitolo vengono descritte modalità tipiche della sua ricerca; ogni sezione è accompagnata dalla voce di Maria Lai attraverso un montaggio di materiali inediti realizzati dal regista Francesco Casu. C’è anche un’ultima, ideale, sezione, che documenta le opere di arte ambientale realizzate nel territorio e in particolare in Ogliastra. La sezione Essere è tessere. Cucire e ricucire documenta le prime prove realizzate negli anni Sessanta, un decennio in cui decide di abbandonare la tecnica grafica e pittorica per dedicarsi alla sperimentazione con i materiali. Nascono così i primi Telai e le Tele cucite: oggetti funzionali del quotidiano, legati all’artigianato sardo, vengono privati della loro funzione pratica per essere trasformati in opere che dimostrano una fervida ricerca espressiva. Il filo rappresenta anche un’idea di trasmissione e comunicazione, Lai vede l’arte come strumento e linguaggio capace di modificare la nostra lettura del mondo, un’attitudine che le deriva dalla sua storia personale di insegnante e che si manifesterà in seguito nei Libri e nelle Fiabe cucite. L’arte è il gioco degli adulti. Giocare e Raccontare raccoglie i giochi dell’arte creati da Lai, riletture di giochi tradizionali con cui ribadisce il ruolo fondante della creazione nella società. Gioco come mezzo per conoscere se stessi e per imparare a relazionarsi con l’altro, un’attività da non relegare al mondo dell’infanzia, ma da continuare a coltivare in età adulta. La sezione Oggetto paesaggio. Disseminare e condividere, racconta l’aspetto relazionale della pratica di Lai attraverso un ampio corpus di oggetti legati a un suo universo affettivo, tra cui sculture che simulano l’aspetto di un libro o di singole pagine, forme che richiamano manufatti del quotidiano, rivendicando però una propria inedita individualità. Il viaggiatoreastrale.Continue Reading..

08
Ago

wo/MAN RAY. Le seduzioni della fotografia

“Solo da Man Ray potevamo attenderci la Ballata delle donne del tempo presente”, scriveva André Breton a proposito dei ritratti femminili del genio nato a Philadelphia nel 1890, sbarcato a Parigi nel 1921 e lì divenuto protagonista assoluto delle stagioni dadaista prima e surrealista poi.

Dal 17 ottobre 2019 al 19 gennaio 2020, CAMERA – Centro Italiano per la Fotografia rende omaggio al grande maestro con la mostra wo/MAN RAY. Le seduzioni della fotografia che racchiuderà circaduecento fotografie, realizzate a partire dagli anni Venti fino alla morte (avvenuta nel 1976), tutte dedicate a un preciso soggetto, la donna, fonte di ispirazione primaria dell’intera sua poetica, proprio nella sua declinazione fotografica. In mostra alcune delle immagini che hanno fatto la storia della fotografia del XX secolo e che sono entrate nell’immaginario collettivo grazie alla capacità di Man Ray di reinventare non solo il linguaggio fotografico, ma anche la rappresentazione del corpo e del volto, i generi stessi del nudo e del ritratto. Attraverso i suoi rayographs, le solarizzazioni, le doppie esposizioni, il corpo femminile è sottoposto a una continua metamorfosi di forme e significati, divenendo di volta in volta forma astratta, oggetto di seduzione, memoria classica, ritratto realista, in una straordinaria – giocosa e raffinatissima – riflessione sul tempo e sui modi della rappresentazione, fotografica e non solo.

Assistenti, muse ispiratrici, complici in diversi passi di questa avventura di vita e intellettuale sono state figure come quelle di Lee Miller, Berenice Abbott, Dora Maar, con la costante, ineludibile presenza diJuliet, la compagna di una vita a cui è dedicato lo strepitoso portfolio “The Fifty Faces of Juliet” (1943- 1944) dove si assiste alla sua straordinaria trasformazione in tante figure diverse, in un gioco di affetti e seduzioni, citazioni e provocazioni.

Ma queste donne sono state, a loro volta, grandi artiste, e la mostra si concentrerà anche su questo aspetto, presentando un corpus di opere, riferite in particolare agli anni Trenta e Quaranta, vale a dire quelli della loro più diretta frequentazione con Man Ray e con l’ambiente dell’avanguardia dada e surrealista parigina. Ecco allora gli splendidi ritratti dei protagonisti di quella stagione di Berenice Abbott, le stranianti visioni della quotidianità di Lee Miller e di Dora Maar: figure, tutte, che oggi ottengono i meritati riconoscimenti al loro lavoro artistico, all’interno di una generale revisione dei modi di narrazione della storia dell’arte del Novecento. A rappresentare l’opera di Berenice Abbott saranno in mostra i ritratti scattati tra il 1926 e il 1938 a Parigi e a New York, capitali dell’arte di avanguardia della prima metà del XX secolo, come quello iconico a Eugene Atget o James Joyce. Dora Maar – alla quale nello stesso periodo della mostra Centre Pompidou e TATE Modern dedicheranno la prima grande ricognizione mondiale – sarà presente con opere riconducibili ad un linguaggio di street photography e di paesaggio come in “Gamin aux Chaussures Dépareillés” (1933). L’indagine del corpo femminile sarà il fulcro del lavoro di Lee Miller, con numerosi autoritratti e nudi di modelle e modelli che lavoravano con lei sia in ambito di ricerca che di fotografia di moda.Continue Reading..

30
Lug

Marina Abramovic all’Ambrosiana

Dal 18 Ottobre al 31 Dicembre 2019, Marina Abramovic arriva nel complesso della Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, nell’area soterranea dell’antico foro romano di Milano, all’interno del percorso di visita della Cripta di San Sepolcro, con il ciclo di video The Kitchen. Homage to Saint Therese.

La Cripta di San Sepolcro, da poco riportata a pieno splendore grazie ai grandi lavori di restauro che la hanno interessata, continua a svelarsi nel connubio con la video arte e i grandi artisti contemporanei, iniziato nel 2017 con Bill Viola e proseguita poi con Michelangelo Antonioni e Andy Warhol.

The Kitchen. Homage to Saint Therese è un’opera molto significativa nella quale Marina Abramovic si relaziona con una delle più importanti figure del cattolicesimo, Santa Teresa d’Avila. L’opera si compone di tre video, che documentano altrettante performance tenute nel 2009 dall’artista nell’ex convento di La Laboral a Gijón, in Spagna.

Curata da Casa Testori e prodotta dal Gruppo MilanoCard, gestore della Cripta di San Sepolcro, in collaborazione con la Veneranda Biblioteca e Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, la mostra interesserà l’area sotterranea della Pinacoteca Ambrosiana dove sorgeva il Foro Romano (oggi Sala dell’area del Foro) e sarà parte del percorso di visita che porterà a rivedere la Cripta di San Sepolcro.

Marina Abramovic all’Ambrosiana
18 Ottobre – 31 Dicembre 2019
Martedi-venerdi 12-20 / sabato e domenica 10-20
www.criptasansepolcromilano.it

Image Up_Marina Abramović “The Kitchen V, Carrying the Milk”, from the series The Kitchen, Homage to Saint Therese. Video installation, color, 2009 (© Marina Abramović – Courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives)

05
Lug

Robert Mapplethorpe. L’obiettivo sensibile

Le Gallerie Nazionali di Arte Antica presentano nella sede di Galleria Corsini a Roma, la mostra Robert Mapplethorpe. L’obiettivo sensibile, a cura di Flaminia Gennari Santori. L’esposizione prosegue il dialogo e l’intreccio tra passato e presente iniziato con l’esposizione di Parade di Picasso nel 2017 e la mostra Eco e Narciso nel 2018, tratto distintivo della strategia delineata dalla direzione del museo.

La mostra, che raccoglie quarantacinque opere, si concentra su alcuni temi che contraddistinguono l’opera di Robert Mapplethorpe (1946 — 1989), notissimo, rivoluzionario e controverso maestro del secondo Novecento: lo studio delle nature morte, dei paesaggi, della statuaria classica e della composizione rinascimentale. La scelta della curatrice di fare una mostra su Robert Mapplethorpe è ispirata alla pratica collezionistica dell’artista, avido raccoglitore di fotografie storiche, passione che condivideva con il compagno Sam Wagstaff, la cui collezione costituisce un fondo straordinario del dipartimento di fotografia del Getty Museum. La selezione delle opere e la loro collocazione nella Galleria rispondono a diverse intenzioni: mettere in luce aspetti del lavoro di Mapplethorpe che risuonano in modo particolare con la sede museale, intesa come spazio — fisico e concettuale — del collezionismo, per innescare una relazione inedita tra i visitatori, le opere e gli ambienti della Galleria. Il 2019 è il trentesimo anniversario della morte di Robert Mapplethorpe e questa iniziativa, organizzata in collaborazione con la Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation di New York, si iscrive in una serie di mostre dedicate all’artista, tra le quali una grande retrospettiva al Guggenheim di New York e, in Italia, quella al Museo Madre di Napoli che si concentra in modo inedito sull’intima matrice performativa della pratica fotografica dell’artista.

La mostra è un evento unico poiché, come afferma la curatrice: “questa è la prima volta che le opere di Mapplethorpe vengono esposte nel contesto di una quadreria settecentesca”.
La selezione delle opere e la loro collocazione nella Galleria rispondono a diverse intenzioni: mettere in luce aspetti del lavoro di Mapplethorpe che risuonano in modo particolare con la Galleria Corsini, intesa come spazio — fisico e concettuale — del collezionismo, per innescare una relazione inedita tra i visitatori, le opere e gli ambienti della Galleria. A chiusura della mostra è in programma un finissage aperto al pubblico, occasione in cui verrà presentato il catalogo bilingue (italiano/inglese) edito da Allemandi, che contiene il testo della curatrice e un ricco repertorio fotografico dell’allestimento.

INFORMAZIONI:
MOSTRA: Robert Mapplethorpe. L’obiettivo sensibile
CURATORE: Flaminia Gennari Santori
SEDE: Roma, Galleria Corsini, via della Lungara, 10
APERTURA AL PUBBLICO: 15 marzo – 6 ottobre 2019
ORARI: mercoledì/lunedì 8.30- 19.00. La biglietteria chiude alle 18.30
GIORNI DI CHIUSURA: martedì

BIGLIETTO BARBERINI CORSINI: Intero 12 € – Ridotto 2 €
Il biglietto è valido dal momento della timbratura per 10 giorni in entrambe le sedi del Museo: Palazzo Barberini e Galleria Corsini. Gratuito: minori di 18 anni, scolaresche e insegnanti accompagnatori dell’Unione Europea (previa prenotazione), studenti e docenti di Architettura, Lettere (indirizzo archeologico o storico-artistico), Conservazione dei Beni Culturali e Scienze della Formazione, Accademie di Belle Arti, dipendenti del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali, membri ICOM, guide ed interpreti turistici in servizio, giornalisti con tesserino dell’ordine, portatori di handicap con accompagnatore, personale docente della scuola, di ruolo o con contratto a termine, dietro esibizione di idonea attestazione sul modello predisposto dal Miur.

Informazioni: tel. 06-4824184 | email: comunicazione@barberinicorsini.org

UFFICIO STAMPA BARBERINI CORSINI GALLERIE NAZIONALI
Maria Bonmassar
ufficiostampa@mariabonmassar.com

Condividi con #MapplethorpeaCorsini

 

gallery a cura di amaliadilanno

03
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Sally Mann – A Thousand Crossings

For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (born 1951) has been taking hauntingly beautiful experimental photographs that explore the essential themes of existence: memory, desire, mortality, family, and nature’s overwhelming indifference towards mankind. What gives unity to this vast corpus of portraits, still lifes, landscapes and miscellaneous studies is that it is the product of one place, the southern United States.

Sally Mann was born in Lexington, Virginia. Many years ago she wrote about what it means to live in the South; drawing on a deep love for that area and a profound awareness of its complex historical heritage, she raised bold, thought-provoking questions—about history, identity, race and religion—that went beyond geographical and national boundaries.

This exhibition is the first major retrospective of the eminent artist’s work; it examines her relationship with her native region and how it has shaped her work. The retrospective is arranged in five parts and features many previously unknown or unpublished works. It is both an overview of four decades of the artist’s work and a thoughtful analysis of how the legacy of the South – at once, homeland and cemetery, refuge and battlefield – is reflected in her work as a powerful and disturbing force that continues to shape the identity and the reality of an entire country.

Curators: Sarah Greenough and Sarah Kennel

Exhibition organised by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachussetts, in association with the Jeu de Paume.

The FOUNDATION NEUFLIZE OBC choses to bring its support to this exhibition.

Sally Mann
A Thousand Crossings
June 18–September 22, 2019

Jeu de Paume
1, place de la Concorde
75008 Paris
France

www.jeudepaume.org
lemagazine.jeudepaume.org

Images: Jessie #25 & Virginia #6 2004. Sally Mann, Gelatin silver print. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of Stephen G. Stein Employee Benefit Trust. © Sally Mann
17
Giu

DORA MAAR in Paris

The largest French retrospective ever devoted to Dora Maar (1907-1997) invites you to discover all the facets of her work, through more than five hundred works and documents. Initially a professional photographer and surrealist before becoming a painter, Dora Maar is an artist of undeniable renown. Far beyond the image, to which she is all too often limited, of her intimate relationship with Picasso, this exhibition retraces the life of an accomplished artist and a free and independent intellectual.

The exhibition is organized by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, in coproduction with the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and in collaboration with the Tate Modern (London).

PRESENTATION BY THE CURATORS
“To Dora of the varied, always beautiful, faces”. Lise Deharme’s dedication to her friend Dora Maar in a copy of Cœur de Pic (1937) poetically sums up the various facets of her artistic career: between photographer and painter, between youthful Surrealist revolution and the existential introspection that marked her painting activity after World War II.

With the collaboration of the J. Paul Getty Museum and in partnership with the Tate Modern, the exhibition organized by the Centre Pompidou aims to highlight, for the first time in a French museum, Dora Maar’s work as an artist, and not only as the muse and mistress of the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. Although for many she remains the model of La femme qui pleure, Dora Maar has nevertheless recently enjoyed critical reception and recognition in studies dedicated to Surrealism and photography. Several exhibitions organized by the Musée National d’Art Moderne, “Explosante fixe” and, more recently, “La Subversion des images” and “Voici Paris”, accorded a special place to Dora Maar’s Surrealist work, with enigmatic photographs such as Portrait d’Ubu and Le Simulateur, a photomontage that joined the museum’s collections in 1973.
The donation of Simulateur was the beginning of the Centre Pompidou’s continued interest in Dora Maar’s photographic work. The 1980s and 1990s were marked by various acquisitions, culminating in 2011 with the arrival of ten prints from the Bouqueret collection. In 2004 the purchase of her studio collection, consisting of some one thousand eight hundred and ninety negatives and two hundred and eighty contact prints, made the collection preserved in the Musée National d’Art Moderne one of the largest public collections of Dora Maar’s work. The recent digitization of negatives has now rendered her work accessible to a large audience of researchers and amateurs. Dora Maar is the only artist with a large portfolio of photographs preserved in the collections – Brancusi, Brassaï, Éli Lotar, Man Ray – who has not yet been the subject of a major exhibition project. Thanks to original archives and close scientific collaboration between the curatorship teams at the Centre Pompidou and the Getty Museum, the Dora Maar retrospective traces the development of this independent artist through more than four hundred works and documents: from her first commissions for fashion and advertising as a studio photographer, to her political commitments as witnessed by her street photographs, including her Surrealist activity and her meeting with Picasso. Lastly, the exhibition shines a special spotlight on her work as a painter, an activity to which she devoted herself for nearly forty years. Like her fellow female photographers, Laure Albin Guillot, Rogi André, Nora Dumas and Germaine Krull, who were active like her between the wars, Dora Maar belongs to the generation of women who liberated themselves professionally and socially through their work as photographers, a profession that was undergoing complete renewal with the development of the illustrated press and advertising. After studying graphic art in the Comité des Dames of the Union des Arts Décoratifs, Dora Maar trained in photography in the late 1920s. Like her mentor, Emmanuel Sougez, she preferred to work in a studio and collaborated with Pierre Kéfer, a set designer for films, from 1931 to 1935. “Kéfer-Dora Maar” became the name and the official credit for the studio, figuring in prints and publications at the time, even when Dora Maar or Pierre Kéfer worked alone on projects. Kéfer’s social flair enabled them to specialise in portraits, fashion and advertising illustrations for the cosmetics sector. This exhibition accords a central position to Dora Maar, a professional photographer endowed with an inventiveness that combined great technical mastery with a dreamlike universe that was much praised by her contemporaries.Continue Reading..

03
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Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies & Theatre of Metamorphoses

Museum Tinguely in Basel and Centre Pompidou-Metz present two parallel exhibitions devoted to the artist Rebecca Horn, offering complementary insights into the work of an artist who is among the most extraordinary of her generation. In the Body Fantasies show in Basel, which combines early performative works and later kinetic sculpture to highlight lines of development within her oeuvre, the focus is on transformation processes of body and machine. The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses explores in Metz the diverse theme of transformation from animist, surrealist and mechanistic perspectives, placing special emphasis on the role of film as a matrix within Horn’s work.

Rebecca Horn. Body Fantasies at Museum Tinguely, Basel
Horn’s work is always inspired by the human body and its movement. In her early performative pieces of the 1960s and ’70s, this is expressed via the use of objects that serve as both extensions and constrictions of the body. Since the 1980s, her work has consisted primarily of kinetic machines and, increasingly, large-scale installations that “come alive” thanks to movement, the performing body being replaced by a mechanical actor. These processes of transformation between expanded bodies and animated machines in Horn’s oeuvre, which now spans five decades, are the focus of the Basel show.

Although in terms of materiality the mechanical constructions with their cold metal contrast starkly with Horn’s earlier body extensions made using fabric and feathers, they do pursue and develop their specific movements. The Body Fantasies exhibition juxtaposes performative works and later machine sculptures in order to follow the unfolding development of such motifs of movement. Divided up into four themes (Flapping Wings, Circulating, Inscribing, Touching) the Basel show traces the development of her works as “stations in a process of transformation” (Rebecca Horn), emphasizing this continuity in her work.

This major solo exhibition of her work—that includes body instruments and actions, films, kinetic sculptures and installations—is the first of its kind in Switzerland for more than 30 years, taking place at Museum Tinguely from June 5 to September 22, 2019.

The exhibition Body Fantasies in Basel is curated by Sandra Beate Reimann.

Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz
First major exhibition in France, after the one at the Musée des Beaux-arts de Grenoble in 1995, the show Rebecca Horn. Theatre of Metamorphoses at Centre Pompidou-Metz follows the processes at work in Rebecca Horn’s research, from her preparatory drawings to her sculptures and installations.

The exhibition reveals in watermarks the affinities they maintain with certain figures of surrealism and their repetition and their transformation during the course of five decades of creation. Rebecca Horn perpetuates in a unique manner, the themes bequeathed to us by mythology and fairytales, such as metamorphosis into a hybrid or mythical creature, the secret life of the world of objects, the secrets of alchemy, or the fantasies of body-robots. These founding themes, which have been present in numerous currents of art history such as Mannerism or Surrealism, resonate in the exhibition. It highlights artists who have nourished her imagination, like Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Marcel Duchamp, or Jean Cocteau and whose works are matched with those of Rebecca Horn. This show is an invitation to share this discernible stage so that it becomes for the visitor-spectator “the free space of his own imagination.”

This exhibition will be taking place at Centre Pompidou-Metz from June 8 to January 13, 2020.
The exhibition Theatre of Metamorphoses in Metz is curated by Emma Lavigne and Alexandra Müller.

Rebecca Horn
Body Fantasies
June 5–September 22, 2019

Rebecca Horn
Theatre of Metamorphoses
June 8, 2019–January 13, 2020

Vernissage: June 4, 6:30pm
Museum Tinguely, Basel
Vernissage: June 7, 7pm
Centre Pompidou-Metz, Metz

www.tinguely.ch
www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

Image: Rebecca Horn, White Body Fan, 1972. Photograph. Rebecca Horn Collection. © 2019 Rebecca Horn/ProLitteris, Zürich

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Gina Pane. Action Psyché

“If I open my ‘body’ so that you can see your blood therein, it is for the love of you: the Other.” 
– Gina PANE, 1973

Gina Pane was instrumental to the development of the international Body Art movement, establishing a unique and corporeal language marked by ritual, symbolism and catharsis. The body, most often the artist’s own physical form, remained at the heart of her artistic practice as a tool of expression and communication until her death in 1990. Coming from the archives of the Galerie Rodolphe Stadler, the Parisian gallery of Pane who were themselves revolutionary in their presentation of avant-garde performance art, her exhibition at Richard Saltoun Gallery celebrates the artist’s pioneering career with a focus on the actions for which she is best known. It provides the most comprehensive display of the artist’s work in London since the Tate’s presentation in 2002.
Exploring universal themes such as love, pain, death, spirituality and the metaphorical power of art, Pane sought to reveal and transform the way we have been taught to experience our body in relation to the self and others. She defined the body as “a place of the pain and suffering, of cunning and hope, of despair and illusion.” Her actions strived to reconnect the forces of the subconscious with the collective memory of the human psyche, and the sacred or spiritual. In these highly choreographed events, Pane subjected herself to intense physical and mental trials, which ranged from desperately seeking to drink from a glass of milk whilst tied, breaking the glass and lapping at the shards with her mouth (Action Transfert, 1973); piercing her arm with a neat line of rose thorns (Action Sentimentale, 1973); to methodically cutting her eyelids and stomach with razor blades (Action Psyché, 1974);and boxing with herself in front of a mirror (Action Il Caso no. 2 sul ring, 1976) – all performed silently in front of gathered audiences. She interpreted the sacrifice and aestheticised risk of such actions as an expression of love for the ‘other’.
Actions were photographed by Francoise Masson, to whom Pane provided detailed diagrams and sketches to indicate the intense moments she wished to be captured on camera. By creating such pre-determined scenarios, which she referred to as constat d’action [event proof], Pane elevated the status of the photographic object beyond mere documentation. With the resulting constat, one can examine the undulating rhythm of images and the subtle shifts in narrative but also Pane’s long-lasting desire to ignite within us a curiosity as to the meaning of our existence.
At the heart of the exhibition is Pane’s 1974 work, Action Psyché, perhaps the most visionary and intense of all of her actions. The consant presented here is considered to be the most definitive manifestation of the work in terms of both its size and scale, incorporating 25 unique colour photographs, preparatory drawings and ephemera preserved in a metal case. Further highlights include Pane’s landscape actions, which reference her earlier career as a painter of colourful, hard-edge abstractions that eventually morphed into outdoor sculptures. From the late 1960s Pane began documenting her activities in natural settings, which generally involved gestures to mark and imprint the land with her body, stones or blocks of wood. Pane combined the images into storyboard-like montages that charted temporal progress but also more importantly implied the presence (and absence) of the human hand. Whilst formally quite simple, the works incorporate sophisticated elements of scale, space and repetition.

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