Tag: photography

03
Lug

Sally Mann – A Thousand Crossings

For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (born 1951) has been taking hauntingly beautiful experimental photographs that explore the essential themes of existence: memory, desire, mortality, family, and nature’s overwhelming indifference towards mankind. What gives unity to this vast corpus of portraits, still lifes, landscapes and miscellaneous studies is that it is the product of one place, the southern United States.

Sally Mann was born in Lexington, Virginia. Many years ago she wrote about what it means to live in the South; drawing on a deep love for that area and a profound awareness of its complex historical heritage, she raised bold, thought-provoking questions—about history, identity, race and religion—that went beyond geographical and national boundaries.

This exhibition is the first major retrospective of the eminent artist’s work; it examines her relationship with her native region and how it has shaped her work. The retrospective is arranged in five parts and features many previously unknown or unpublished works. It is both an overview of four decades of the artist’s work and a thoughtful analysis of how the legacy of the South – at once, homeland and cemetery, refuge and battlefield – is reflected in her work as a powerful and disturbing force that continues to shape the identity and the reality of an entire country.

Curators: Sarah Greenough and Sarah Kennel

Exhibition organised by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachussetts, in association with the Jeu de Paume.

The FOUNDATION NEUFLIZE OBC choses to bring its support to this exhibition.

Sally Mann
A Thousand Crossings
June 18–September 22, 2019

Jeu de Paume
1, place de la Concorde
75008 Paris
France

www.jeudepaume.org
lemagazine.jeudepaume.org

Images: Jessie #25 & Virginia #6 2004. Sally Mann, Gelatin silver print. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of Stephen G. Stein Employee Benefit Trust. © Sally Mann
24
Mar

Irving Penn. Centennial

With a body of work stretching from portraits of Pablo Picasso, Marlene Dietrich, Alfred Hitchcock, New Guinean natives to abstract female nudes, exquisite still lifes, all the way to glamorous fashion photos for Vogue, Irving Penn (1917–2009) is considered the most influential photographer of the twentieth century. In his nearly 70-year career, he created an exceptionally diverse and distinctive visual cosmos. An unparalleled master of different genres, he succeeded in weaving contemporary photography and art. His new and different photographic gaze made each of his subjects special, whether they were human beings or inanimate objects. His innovative photographs are infused with clarity, elegance, perfection, and a flawless beauty. His unique style and pared-down aesthetic remain influential to this day, and have had a profound impact on innumerable successors. On the 100th anniversary of his birth, C/O Berlin is commemorating Irving Penn with a major retrospective. The exhibition featuring around 240 works was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in collaboration with The Irving Penn Foundation. More than 180 works to be donated by The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art forms the core of the exhibition, among them the famous studies of Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, the most sought-after photo model of the time, who became Irving Penn’s wife and muse. A comprehensive monograph accompanying the exhibition is published by Schirmer/Mosel, Munich.

Irving Penn (1917–2009) studied at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, where Alexei Brodovitch, Art Director at Harper’s Bazaar, taught up to 1934. In 1943, Penn photographed his first cover photo for Vogue followed by many more. He became one of the most important fashion photographers of the 1950s and 1960s. After founding his own photographic studio in New York in 1953, he continued to create numerous portraits of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and art and took innumerable still life and fashion photographs. Irving Penn ranks among the most important photographers of the last century, in no small part because of his pioneering work in both commercial and artistic photography. Penn died in New York in 2009. His photographs have been shown in numerous international exhibitions and are in major museums and collections throughout the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Irving Penn. Centennial
March 24–July 1, 2018

Opening: March 23, 7pm

C/O Berlin Foundation
Amerika Haus
Hardenbergstrasse 22-24
10623 Berlin
Germany

17
Giu

DORA MAAR in Paris

The largest French retrospective ever devoted to Dora Maar (1907-1997) invites you to discover all the facets of her work, through more than five hundred works and documents. Initially a professional photographer and surrealist before becoming a painter, Dora Maar is an artist of undeniable renown. Far beyond the image, to which she is all too often limited, of her intimate relationship with Picasso, this exhibition retraces the life of an accomplished artist and a free and independent intellectual.

The exhibition is organized by the Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, in coproduction with the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles) and in collaboration with the Tate Modern (London).

PRESENTATION BY THE CURATORS
“To Dora of the varied, always beautiful, faces”. Lise Deharme’s dedication to her friend Dora Maar in a copy of Cœur de Pic (1937) poetically sums up the various facets of her artistic career: between photographer and painter, between youthful Surrealist revolution and the existential introspection that marked her painting activity after World War II.

With the collaboration of the J. Paul Getty Museum and in partnership with the Tate Modern, the exhibition organized by the Centre Pompidou aims to highlight, for the first time in a French museum, Dora Maar’s work as an artist, and not only as the muse and mistress of the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso. Although for many she remains the model of La femme qui pleure, Dora Maar has nevertheless recently enjoyed critical reception and recognition in studies dedicated to Surrealism and photography. Several exhibitions organized by the Musée National d’Art Moderne, “Explosante fixe” and, more recently, “La Subversion des images” and “Voici Paris”, accorded a special place to Dora Maar’s Surrealist work, with enigmatic photographs such as Portrait d’Ubu and Le Simulateur, a photomontage that joined the museum’s collections in 1973.
The donation of Simulateur was the beginning of the Centre Pompidou’s continued interest in Dora Maar’s photographic work. The 1980s and 1990s were marked by various acquisitions, culminating in 2011 with the arrival of ten prints from the Bouqueret collection. In 2004 the purchase of her studio collection, consisting of some one thousand eight hundred and ninety negatives and two hundred and eighty contact prints, made the collection preserved in the Musée National d’Art Moderne one of the largest public collections of Dora Maar’s work. The recent digitization of negatives has now rendered her work accessible to a large audience of researchers and amateurs. Dora Maar is the only artist with a large portfolio of photographs preserved in the collections – Brancusi, Brassaï, Éli Lotar, Man Ray – who has not yet been the subject of a major exhibition project. Thanks to original archives and close scientific collaboration between the curatorship teams at the Centre Pompidou and the Getty Museum, the Dora Maar retrospective traces the development of this independent artist through more than four hundred works and documents: from her first commissions for fashion and advertising as a studio photographer, to her political commitments as witnessed by her street photographs, including her Surrealist activity and her meeting with Picasso. Lastly, the exhibition shines a special spotlight on her work as a painter, an activity to which she devoted herself for nearly forty years. Like her fellow female photographers, Laure Albin Guillot, Rogi André, Nora Dumas and Germaine Krull, who were active like her between the wars, Dora Maar belongs to the generation of women who liberated themselves professionally and socially through their work as photographers, a profession that was undergoing complete renewal with the development of the illustrated press and advertising. After studying graphic art in the Comité des Dames of the Union des Arts Décoratifs, Dora Maar trained in photography in the late 1920s. Like her mentor, Emmanuel Sougez, she preferred to work in a studio and collaborated with Pierre Kéfer, a set designer for films, from 1931 to 1935. “Kéfer-Dora Maar” became the name and the official credit for the studio, figuring in prints and publications at the time, even when Dora Maar or Pierre Kéfer worked alone on projects. Kéfer’s social flair enabled them to specialise in portraits, fashion and advertising illustrations for the cosmetics sector. This exhibition accords a central position to Dora Maar, a professional photographer endowed with an inventiveness that combined great technical mastery with a dreamlike universe that was much praised by her contemporaries.Continue Reading..

25
Mar

Surrealist Lee Miller

Preferisco fare una foto, che essere una foto”.
Lee Miller

Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea sono lieti di presentare la mostra “Surrealist Lee Miller”, la prima italiana della retrospettiva dedicata ad una delle fotografe più importanti del Novecento. Lanciata da Condé Nast, sulla copertina di Vogue nel 1927, Lee Miller fin da subito diventa una delle modelle più apprezzate e richieste dalle riviste di moda. Molti i fotografi che la ritraggono – Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Huene o Arnold Genthe – e innumerevoli i servizi fotografici di cui è stata protagonista, fino a quando – all’incirca due anni più tardi – la Miller non decide di passare dall’altra parte dell’obiettivo. Donna caparbia e intraprendente, rimane colpita profondamente dalle immagini del fotografo più importante dell’epoca, Man Ray, che riesce ad incontrare diventandone modella e musa ispiratrice. Ma, cosa più importante, instaura con lui un duraturo sodalizio artistico e professionale che assieme li porterà a sviluppare la tecnica della solarizzazione. Amica di Picasso, di Ernst, Cocteau, Mirò e di tutta la cerchia dei surrealisti, Miller in questi anni apre a Parigi il suo primo studio diventando nota come ritrattista e fotografa di moda, anche se il nucleo più importante di opere in questo periodo è certamente rappresentato dalle immagini surrealiste, molte delle quali erroneamente attribuite a Man Ray. A questo corpus appartengono le celebri Nude bent forward, Condom e Tanja Ramm under a bell jar, opere presenti in mostra, accanto ad altri celebri scatti che mostrano appieno come il percorso artistico di Lee Miller sia stato, non solo autonomo, ma tecnicamente maturo e concettualmente sofisticato. Dopo questa prima parentesi formativa, nel 1932 Miller decide di tornare a New York per aprire un nuovo studio fotografico che, nonostante il successo, chiude due anni più tardi quando per seguire il marito – il ricco uomo d’affari egiziano Aziz Eloui Bey – si trasferisce al Cairo.  Intraprende lunghi viaggi nel deserto e fotografa villaggi e rovine, iniziando a confrontarsi con la fotografia di reportage, un genere che Lee Miller porta avanti anche negli anni successivi quando, insieme a Roland Penrose – l’artista surrealista che sarebbe diventato il suo secondo marito – viaggia sia nel sud che nell’est europeo. Poco prima dello scoppio della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, nel 1939, lascia l’Egitto per trasferirsi a Londra, ed ignorando gli ordini dall’ambasciata americana di tornare in patria, inizia a lavorare come fotografa freelance per Vogue. Documenta gli incessanti bombardamenti su Londra ma il suo contributo più importante arriverà nel 1944 quando è corrispondente accreditata al seguito delle truppe americane e collaboratrice del fotografo David E. Scherman per le riviste “Life” e “Time”.  Fu lei l’unica fotografa donna a seguire gli alleati durante il D-Day, a documentare le attività al fronte a durante la liberazione.
Le sue fotografie ci testimoniano in modo vivido e mai didascalico l’assedio di St. Malo, la Liberazione di Parigi, i combattimenti in Lussemburgo e in Alsazia e, inoltre, la liberazione dei campi di concentramento di Dachau e Buchenwald. È proprio in questi giorni febbrili che viene fatta la scoperta degli appartamenti di Hitler a Monaco di Baviera ed è qui che scatta quella che probabilmente è la sua fotografia più celebre: l’autoritratto nella vasca da bagno del Führer. Dopo la guerra Lee Miller ha continuato a scattare per Vogue per altri due anni, occupandosi di moda e celebrità, ma lo stress post traumatico riportato in seguito alla permanenza al fronte contribuì al suo lento ritirarsi dalla scena artistica, anche se il suo apporto alle biografie scritte da Penrose su Picasso, Mirò, Man Ray e Tapies fu fondamentale, sia come apparato fotografico che aneddotico.
La mostra (14 marzo – 9 giugno 2019), organizzata da Palazzo Pallavicini e curata da ONO arte contemporanea, si compone di 101 fotografie che ripercorrono l’intera carriera artistica della fotografa, attraverso quelli che sono i suoi scatti più famosi ed iconici, compresa la sessione realizzata negli appartamenti di Hitler, raramente esposte anche a livello internazionale e mai diffuse a mezzo stampa per l’uso improprio fattone negli anni da gruppi neonazisti.Per ulteriori informazioni sull’archivio Lee Miller www.leemiller.co.uk

Palazzo Pallavicini
via San Felice, 24 – Bologna

Surrealist Lee Miller
dal 14 marzo al 9 giugno 2019

ORARI: Da giovedì a domenica: 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso). Chiuso il lunedì, martedì e mercoledì. Aperture straordinarie: 22 e 25 aprile 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 1 maggio 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 2 giugno 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso)

ENTI PROMOTORI: Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea

INFO: +39 3313471504 – info@palazzopallavicini.com

Image: Charlie Chaplin by Lee Miller © Lee Miller Archives England 2018. All Rights Reserved

 

11
Set

Sarah Moon. Time at Work

Milano rende omaggio a Sarah Moon, artista e fotografa che abita i territori dell’arte e della fotografia, con due mostre che avranno luogo presso la Fondazione Sozzani e Armani/Silos.

La Fondazione Sozzani con la mostra “Sarah Moon. Time at Work” mette in evidenza il percorso artistico dell’artista, dal 1995 al 2018. Circa novanta opere, accompagnate da uno storico film documentario di Sarah Moon su Lillian Bassman (“There is something about Lillian”, 2001) e dal cortometraggio “Contacts” (1995), saranno esposte negli spazi della Galleria Carla Sozzani. In parallelo, Armani/Silos espone “From one season to another”, una raccolta di oltre 170 opere – a colori e in bianco e nero – che offre uno sguardo trasversale sul lavoro di Sarah Moon, accostando opere inedite e meno conosciute alle sue evocative immagini di moda.
Artista francese tra le maggiori fotografe contemporanee, Sarah Moon da molti anni indaga la bellezza e lo scorrere del tempo con un linguaggio proprio e inconfondibile, con cui ha saputo leggere un mondo onirico, in equilibrio tra fiaba e fantasia.
Scrive Sarah Moon: “Time at Work. Questa è la storia del tempo che passa e cancella. Qui e ora, la storia che racconto non è completamente mia, è la storia di queste fotografie prima che scompaiano. È il tempo al lavoro. Per caso ho ritrovato queste immagini in positivo da polaroid che non ho terminato alcune erano inaspettate, altre solo rovinate, molte sbiadite poco a poco. Le ho raccolte e unite con alcuni lavori recenti.”
Con le sue visioni, in una forma volutamente evanescente, l’artista evoca momenti, sensazioni e coincidenze provenienti da una realtà immaginaria, filtrata dal ricordo e dall’inconscio.
Le sue fotografie sono così misteriose, così cariche di tensione drammatica e tuttavia riservate, rappresentano un intero mondo visto attraverso uno spiraglio luminoso.
Come dice lei stessa, le sue immagini parlano di lei.

Fondazione Sozzani
Sarah Moon. Time at Work.
Dal 19 settembre 2018 al 6 gennaio 2019

Armani/Silos
Sarah Moon. From one season to another. Dal 19 settembre al 6 gennaio 2019Continue Reading..

22
Mar

Irving Penn. Centennial

With a body of work stretching from portraits of Pablo Picasso, Marlene Dietrich, Alfred Hitchcock, New Guinean natives to abstract female nudes, exquisite still lifes, all the way to glamorous fashion photos for Vogue, Irving Penn (1917–2009) is considered the most influential photographer of the twentieth century. In his nearly 70-year career, he created an exceptionally diverse and distinctive visual cosmos. An unparalleled master of different genres, he succeeded in weaving contemporary photography and art. His new and different photographic gaze made each of his subjects special, whether they were human beings or inanimate objects. His innovative photographs are infused with clarity, elegance, perfection, and a flawless beauty. His unique style and pared-down aesthetic remain influential to this day, and have had a profound impact on innumerable successors. On the 100th anniversary of his birth, C/O Berlin is commemorating Irving Penn with a major retrospective. The exhibition featuring around 240 works was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in collaboration with The Irving Penn Foundation. More than 180 works to be donated by The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art forms the core of the exhibition, among them the famous studies of Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, the most sought-after photo model of the time, who became Irving Penn’s wife and muse. A comprehensive monograph accompanying the exhibition is published by Schirmer/Mosel, Munich.

Irving Penn (1917–2009) studied at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art, where Alexei Brodovitch, Art Director at Harper’s Bazaar, taught up to 1934. In 1943, Penn photographed his first cover photo for Vogue followed by many more. He became one of the most important fashion photographers of the 1950s and 1960s. After founding his own photographic studio in New York in 1953, he continued to create numerous portraits of luminaries from the worlds of film, music, and art and took innumerable still life and fashion photographs. Irving Penn ranks among the most important photographers of the last century, in no small part because of his pioneering work in both commercial and artistic photography. Penn died in New York in 2009. His photographs have been shown in numerous international exhibitions and are in major museums and collections throughout the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Irving Penn. Centennial
March 24–July 1, 2018

Opening: March 23, 7pm

C/O Berlin Foundation
Amerika Haus
Hardenbergstrasse 22-24
10623 Berlin
Germany

Saul Steinberg in Nose Mask, New York, 1966 © Condé Nast