Tag: amalia di Lanno

14
Dic

Anthony McCall. Split Second

Sean Kelly is delighted to announce Split Second, Anthony McCall’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery. Occupying the entire space, the exhibition features two new ‘solid-light’ installations, McCall’s seminal horizontal work Doubling Back, 2003, and a curated selection of black and white photographs, a number of which will be exhibited in the US for the first time. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, December 13, 6-8pm. The artist will be present. Anthony McCall is widely recognized for his ‘solid-light’ installations, a series he began in 1973 with the ground-breaking Line Describing a Cone, in which a volumetric form composed of projected light slowly evolves in three-dimensional space. In Split Second, McCall further expands the development of this series, creating a dialogue between two new works, Split Second and Split Second (Mirror). Split Second consists of two separate points of light emanating from the top and bottom of the gallery’s back wall. The projections expand to reveal a flat blade and an elliptical cone, which combine to create a complex field of rotating, interpenetrating planes in space. Split Second (Mirror) is a single projection in which the “split” is created by interrupting the throw of light with a wall-sized mirror. The plane of light is reflected back onto itself, creating a shifting volumetric cone, which exists seamlessly both in real space and as a reflected object.  Doubling Back, 2003, first exhibited in the 2004 Whitney Biennale, is on view in the lower gallery. This work marked McCall’s return to making art following a more than twenty-year hiatus and was the genesis of a new series of films. The piece is distinguished by the direct way in which it uses the architecture of the gallery as a framing device. Consisting of two identical animated wave drawings, the forms intersect as they travel slowly through one another, one moving horizontally, the other vertically to produce curving chambers and pockets of light that unfold against one side of the gallery. Each solid-light installation occupies a space where cinema, sculpture and drawing overlap. The visibility of these works is dependent upon mist produced by a haze machine, inducting the spectator into a three-dimensional field where forms gradually shift and turn over time. The selection of photographs in the front gallery includes images from McCall’s most recent series, Smoke Screen, 2018, which explores moments of intersection between smoke, projected light, and photography. These images relate to McCall’s photographs from the early 1970s, a selection of which will also be on view.

Anthony McCall lives and works in New York City. In the past year, his work has been recognized with solo exhibitions at The Hepworth Wakefield, United Kingdom, and Pioneer Works, Brooklyn, New York. McCall’s solo exhibitions include: Serpentine Gallery, London, United Kingdom; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, Germany; Hangar Bicocca, Milan, Italy; Musée de Rochechouart, Rochechouart, France; the Eye Filmmuseum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; LAC Lugano Arte e Cultura, Lugano, Switzerland; Les Abattoirs, Toulouse, France; the Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, Nevada; Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden; and Tate Britain, London, United Kingdom. His work has been featured in group exhibitions at the Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna, Austria; Kunsthaus Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, Germany, the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC; the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

McCall’s work is represented in numerous collections including, amongst others, Tate, London, United Kingdom; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany; the Hall Art Foundation, New York; the Kramlich Collection, San Francisco, California; the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Spain; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne/Rhône-Alpes, France; The Margulies Collection, Miami, Florida; the Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; the Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany; Sammlung Falckenberg Collection of Art, Hamburg, Germany; SFMoMA, San Francisco, California; Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Anthony McCall. Split Second
DECEMBER 14, 2018 – JANUARY 26, 2019
OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, December 13, 6-8pm

Sean Kelly Gallery
475 Tenth Avenue
New York NY 10018

25
Ott

Mario Merz. Igloos

“Igloos”, la mostra dedicata a Mario Merz (Milano, 1925-2003), tra gli artisti più rilevanti del secondo dopoguerra, riunisce il corpusdelle sue opere più iconiche, gli igloo, datati tra il 1968 e l’anno della sua scomparsa.
Il progetto espositivo, curato da Vicente Todolí e realizzato in collaborazione con la Fondazione Merz, si espande nelle Navate di Pirelli HangarBicocca e pone il visitatore al centro di una costellazione di oltre trenta opere di grandi dimensioni a forma di igloo, un paesaggio inedito dal forte impatto visivo. Mario Merz, figura chiave dell’Arte Povera, indaga e rappresenta i processi di trasformazione della natura e della vita umana: in particolare gli igloo, visivamente riconducibili alle primordiali abitazioni, diventano per l’artista l’archetipo dei luoghi abitati e del mondo e la metafora delle diverse relazioni tra interno ed esterno, tra spazio fisico e spazio concettuale, tra individualità e collettività. Queste opere sono caratterizzate da una struttura metallica rivestita da una grande varietà di materiali di uso comune, come argilla, vetro, pietre, juta e acciaio – spesso appoggiati o incastrati tra loro in modo instabile – e dall’uso di elementi e scritte al neon. La mostra offre l’occasione per osservare lavori di importanza storica e dalla portata innovativa, provenienti da collezioni private e museali internazionali, raccolti ed esposti insieme per la prima volta in numero così ampio.

Mario Merz. Igloos
a cura di Vincenzo Todolì
25 ottobre 2018 – 24 febbraio 2019
in collaborazione con Fondazione Merz

Pirelli HangarBicocca
Milano
20126 Milano
T (+39) 02 66 11 15 73
info@hangarbicocca.org

18
Ott

Alberto Giacometti. A retrospective

This exhibition surveys four decades of production by Alberto Giacometti (b. 1901; d. 1966), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. More than 200 sculptures, paintings, and drawings make up a show that offers a unique perspective on the artist’s work, highlighting the extraordinary holdings of artworks and archive material gathered by Giacometti’s wife, Annette, now in the Fondation Giacometti in Paris.  Giacometti was born in Switzerland to a family of artists. He was introduced to painting and sculpture by his father, the renowned Neo-Impressionist painter Giovanni Giacometti. Three heads done of him by the young Giacometti are seen on display here. In 1922 Alberto Giacometti moved to Paris to continue his artistic training, and four years later he set up what was to remain his studio until the end of his life, a rented space of just 23 square meters on the Rue Hippolyte-Maindron, close to Montparnasse. In that tiny narrow room, Giacometti created a very personal vision of the world about him. The human figure is a fundamental theme in this artist’s oeuvre. Over the years, he produced works inspired by the people around him, especially his brother Diego, his wife Annette, and his friends and lovers. The artist said: “For me, sculpture, painting, and drawing have always been means of understanding my own vision of the outside world, and above all the face and the whole of the human being. Or to put it more simply, of my fellow creatures, and especially of those who for one reason or another are closest to me.” Giacometti’s ideas on how to approach the human figure were to become crucial questions of contemporary art for the following generations of artists.

Continue Reading..

30
Apr

Lygia Pape

Fondazione Carriero presents Lygia Pape, curated by Francesco Stocchi, the first solo exhibition ever held in an Italian institution on one of the leading figures of Neoconcretism in Brazil, organized in close collaboration with Estate Projeto Lygia Pape

Fifteen years after the death of Lygia Pape (Rio de Janeiro, 1927-2004), Fondazione Carriero sets out to narrate and explore the career of the Brazilian artist, emphasizing her eclectic, versatile approach. Across a career spanning over half a century, Pape came to grips with multiple languages—from drawing to sculpture, video to dance and poetry, ranging into installation and photography— absorbing the experiences of European modernism and blending them with the cultural tenets of her country, generating a very personal synthesis of artistic practices. Inserted in the architecture of the Foundation, the exhibition represents a true voyage in the artist’s world, organized in different spaces, each of which delves into one specific aspect of her work, through the presentation of nuclei of pieces from 1952 to 2000. The exhibition provides an opportunity for knowledge, analysis and investigation of an artist whose practice embodies some of the key areas of research of Post-War. 

The exhibition Lygia Pape offers visitors a chance to approach the artist’s output and to observe it from multiple vantage points, starting from analysis of her research, a synthesis of invention and contamination from which color, intuition and sensuality emerge. Full and empty, interior and exterior, presence and absence coexist, conveying Pape’s figure and continuous experimentation, sustained by an ability to combine materials and techniques through the use of unconventional modes and languages of expression. Seen as a whole, her research reveals the way each new project develops as a natural evolution of those that preceded it. These connections are highlighted in the display of the works, spreading through the three floors of the Foundation and linked together by a common root, a leitmotif that originates in observation of nature and develops in a maximum formal tension using a reduced vocabulary.
The works on view include Livro Noite e Dia and Livro da Criação, books seen as objects with which to establish a relationship, condensations of mental and sensory experiences. The Tecelares, a series of engravings on wood, combine the Brazilian folk tradition with the Constructivist research of European origin. The exhibition also features Tteia1, the distinguished installation that embodies Lygia Pape’s investigation of materials, the third dimension and the constant drive towards reinvention and reinterpretation of her language.
 Today her work offers interesting tools for the interpretation of the issues of our present, in an approach based less on rules and more on spontaneity, applied by the artist has a key for deconstructing the standards and schemes of preconceptions. 

About Fondazione Carriero
Fondazione Carriero opened to the public in 2015, thanks to the great passion of its founder for art and his desire to share this passion with the public. It is a non-profit institution that joins research activities to commissioning new works for solo, and group exhibitions.

With the creation of a free venue open to everyone, the Foundation aims to promote, enhance, and spread modern and contemporary art and culture, acting as a cultural center in collaboration with the most acclaimed and innovative contemporary artists while also drawing attention to new artists or those from the past who deserve to be reconsidered. From a perspective that joins rediscovery and experimentation, investigations into any form of intellectual expression are joined with commissioning new works.

Lygia Pape
March 28–July 21, 2019 

Fondazione Carriero
Via Cino del Duca 4 
20122 Milan 
Italy 
Hours: Monday–Saturday 11am–6pm H

Contact
T +39 02 3674 7039 
info@fondazionecarriero.org
press@fondazionecarriero.org

18
Apr

Latifa Echakhch – Romance

Fondazione Memmo presenta, da venerdì 3 maggio, Romance, personale dell’artista franco-marocchina Latifa Echakhch, a cura di Francesco Stocchi.

Romance nasce dall’invito rivolto dalla Fondazione Memmo a Latifa Echakhch, per la realizzazione di un progetto inedito a partire dalle suggestioni derivanti dal suo incontro con il paesaggio, le atmosfere, la storia e le vicende socio-culturali di Roma.

La mostra trae origine da un processo di avvicinamento graduale che ha portato l’artista a scoprire, interiorizzare e tradurre gli stimoli raccolti nel corso delle sue visite.

Il titolo della mostra, Romance, riassume lo spirito dell’intervento di Latifa Echakhch volto a rappresentare la stratificazione architettonica, culturale e geologica della città, in cui si intrecciano differenti periodi storici e si mescolano molteplici linguaggi e registri espressivi. L’artista è interessata a esprimere questo sentimento di trasporto, di indagine e sorpresa attraverso un’istallazione realizzata negli spazi della Fondazione Memmo (le antiche scuderie di Palazzo Ruspoli): un’opera immersiva, inedita che richiama – sia concettualmente, sia per la tecnica realizzativa – i “capricci” architettonici in materiale cementizio che ornano i giardini di fine Ottocento.

Questa mostra segna una ulteriore tappa del percorso attraverso cui la Fondazione Memmo intende promuovere l’incontro di artisti internazionali con il tessuto produttivo e artigianale della città di Roma attraverso la produzione di progetti espositivi che rivisitino materiali e tecniche tradizionali.

Latifa Echakhch _ Romance
A cura di Francesco Stocchi
Anteprima stampa: 2 maggio 2019, ore 11.30
Vernissage: 2 maggio 2019, ore 18.00
Dal 3 maggio al 27 ottobre 2019

Orario: tutti i giorni dalle 11.00 alle 18.00 (martedì chiuso)
Ingresso libero

CONTATTI PER LA STAMPA
PCM Studio
Via Farini, 70 | 20159 Milano
www.paolamanfredi.com

08
Apr

ROMAMOR di Anne et Patrick Poirier

A Villa Medici fino al 5 maggio 2019 è possibile visitare la prima mostra monografica di Anne e Patrick Poirier in Italia, ROMAMOR. A cura di Chiara Parisi, la mostra chiude l’ambizioso programma espositivo ideata da Muriel Mayette-Holtz – direttrice dal 2015 al 2018 – che ha visto alternarsi grandi nomi dal 2017, tra cui Annette Messager, Yoko Ono e Claire Tabouret, Elizabeth Peyton e Camille Claudel, Tatiana Trouvé e Katharina Grosse, senza dimenticare i numerosi artisti internazionali che hanno partecipato alla mostra nei giardini, Ouvert la Nuit. A questi progetti si sono affiancate le due grandi mostre dedicate ai pensionnaires, al crocevia tra ricerca e produzione, Swimming is Saving e Take Me (I’m yours).

Anne e Patrick Poirier sono tra le coppie francesi più celebri della scena artistica internazionale: una simbiosi creativa che ha preso corpo proprio a Villa Medici, cinquanta anni fa. Il trascorrere del tempo, le tracce e le cicatrici del suo passaggio, la fragilità delle costruzioni umane e la potenza delle rovine, antiche come contemporanee, sono la fonte cui attinge la loro creatività, assumendo le sembianze d’una archeologia permeata di malinconia e di gioco. Anne è nata nel 1941 a Marsiglia; Patrick nel 1942 a Nantes. Il loro lavoro è caratterizzato dall’impronta di violenza lasciata dall’epoca che hanno vissuto – loro che, sin dalla più tenera infanzia, si sono confrontati con la guerra e con i suoi paesaggi devastati. Nel 1943, Anne assiste ai bombardamenti del porto di Marsiglia, e Patrick perde suo padre durante la distruzione del centro storico di Nantes.

Vincitori del Grand Prix de Rome nel 1967, dopo aver frequentato l’École des arts décoratifs di Parigi, Anne e Patrick soggiornano a Villa Medici dal 1968 al 1972 – invitati da Balthus. Ed è proprio a Villa Medici che decidono di unire la loro visione artistica, firmando congiuntamente i lavori. Anne e Patrick Poirier appartengono a quella generazione di artisti che, viaggiando e aprendosi al mondo fin dagli anni Sessanta, sviluppa una fascinazione per le città e le civiltà antiche e, in particolare, i processi della loro scomparsa. In linea con questa sensibilità: città misteriose, ricostruzioni archeologiche immaginarie, fascino delle rovine, indagine di giardini, unione di opere storiche e produzioni in situ, sono gli elementi che danno vita alla mostra ROMAMOR a Villa Medici. La loro prima grande opera comune (1969), un plastico in terracotta di Ostia Antica, nasce dal ricordo delle varie peregrinazioni nell’antico porto romano, eletta dagli artisti terreno di scavi per eccellenza. Da allora, il proposito di ritrovare le tracce di una storia remota, li condurrà spesso a esperire l’assenza, la perdita delle architetture, dei segni e dell’eredità delle civiltà.

“Passiamo dall’ombra alla luce, alternativamente, dal nero al bianco, dall’ordine al caos, dalla rovina alla costruzione utopica, dal passato al futuro, e dalla introspezione alla proiezione. La duplice identità del nostro binomio di architetti-archeologi è ciò che consente questa erranza tra universi apparentemente lontani tra loro, dei quali cerchiamo le relazioni nascoste”, secondo le parole degli artisti. A Villa Medici, la mostra si apre con una La Palissade/Scavi in corso (2019) che conduce lo spettatore nello spazio della Cisterna offrendogli la visione di una monumentale maquette di rovine, Finis Terrae (2019) illuminate da una scritta Un monde qui se fait sauter lui-même ne permet plus qu’on lui fasse le portrait (2001). Permeato da queste prime visioni, lo spettatore entra nella prima sala con la presenza magica di una scultura luminosa, Le monde à l’envers (2019), costruita a partire di un globo terrestre e costellazioni, che confluisce in un autoritratto degli artisti sotto forma di Giano Bifronte, dio dell’inizio e della fine, rivolto al futuro sempre con un occhio al passato. Un’opera ambivalente, manifesto della mostra, da leggere come contrappunto all’arazzo Palmyre (2018), sulla devastazione del sito siriano da parte dell’Isis nel 2015. Lo spettatore prosegue trovando, al centro della sala successiva, L’incendie de la grande bibliothèque (1976), opera fondamentale degli artisti, realizzata a carbone, metafora architettonica della memoria, della mente umana e del suo funzionamento. A metà tra catastrofe e utopia, tra storia e mito, quest’opera pone lo spettatore di fronte al senso di fragilità caratteristico delle opere di Anne e Patrick Poirier. Ouranopolis (1995), ovvero la “città celeste”, occupa la sala successiva. “Dall’esterno, quasi nulla si vede”: sospesa al soffitto, la scultura consente di intravedere attraverso minuscoli fori, uno spazio interno che conta quaranta sale. Anne e Patrick parlano dell’amore che nutrono per le biblioteche, intese come metafore della memoria; un’attrazione che li conduce a creare dei musei-biblioteche ideali, in questo caso un edificio ellittico che sembra poter volare verso nuovi mondi, trasportando lontano il suo carico di immagini di fronte a una possibile catastrofe imminente. Lo spazio onirico che lo spettatore intravede dagli oblò si sviluppa, lungo la grande scalinata delle antiche scuderie di Villa Medici, catapultandolo all’interno di una “irrealtà inquietante”. Uno spazio luminoso, Le songe de Jacob (2019), composto da nomi di costellazioni, scale fosforescenti, forme serpentine sospese, piume bianche sparse sulla scalinata accompagnano il passo dello spettatore, gradino dopo gradino, sino a raggiungere lo spazio successivo, di immacolato candore, dove appare Rétrovisions(2018), autoritratto tridimensionale della coppia che si riflette in uno specchio, circondata da parole al neon che parlando di utopia, illuminano lo spazio, abbagliandoci. Poco lontano, Surprise Party (1996): un mappamondo sgonfio e sbiadito poggiato su un vecchio giradischi crepitante, a sua volta posato su una vecchia valigia – altro elemento chiave del vocabolario dei Poirier – che evoca una geografia nomade, “un mondo che gira al contrario. Una terra che stride”. Tra vertigini e vestigia, lo spettatore si trova di fronte a Dépôt de mémoire et d’oubli(1989): una croce che svetta, fatta di impronte lasciate sulla carta di maschere di dei antichi. Con l’opera Lost Archetypes (1979), lo sguardo si trova davanti alla ricostruzione in scala umana di grandi opere architettoniche: una serie di quattro plastici bianchi di siti in rovina. Tra passato, presente e futuro, caduta, costruzione ed elevazione, Anne e Patrick Poirier fanno vacillare i punti di riferimento storici del pubblico romano. Nella sala successiva, i collages: disegni vegetali fissati nella cera, Journal d’Ouranopolis (1995), un tentativo di lottare contro la privazione della memoria e dell’oblio. La sensazione di vulnerabilità, che presiede alla distruzione del nostro mondo, si ritrova nelle immagini di Fragility e Ruins (1996). La mostra si estende al giardino di Villa Medici: nel Piazzale, gli artisti disegnano con delle pietre di marmo di Carrara, la forma di un cervello umano, Le Labyrinthe du Cerveau (2019), con i suoi due emisferi. Un “manifesto autobiografico bicefalo”, che raffigura la congiunzione delle loro menti, metafora di una pratica di coppia che rievoca la tematica da loro esplorata negli ultimi cinquant’anni: i meccanismi legati al passare del tempo. Le loro costruzioni sono come grandi cervelli, paesaggio che bisogna percorrere. Amano dire, a questo proposito: “L’immagine del cervello, fatto di due emisferi, è ciò che meglio può rappresentarci; rappresentare contemporaneamente l’unità e la diversità della simbiosi che siamo”. Il visitatore continua la sua passeggiata immaginando di prendere una pausa nella monumentale sedia in granito, Siège Mesopotamia (2012-15) che troneggia nel giardino. Poco lontano, nella Fontana dell’obelisco, si intravede Regard des Statues (2019): anonimi occhi in gesso ci appaiono deformati dall’acqua in cui sono immersi. L’occhio che guarda il cielo, il tempo, l’occhio del ricordo e dell’oblio, l’occhio della storia e della violenza, conduce lo spettatore all’Atelier Balthus, dove emerge un’opera mitica, realizzata proprio a Villa Medici nel 1971: stele di carta, costruite a partire dai calchi delle Erme – le figure in marmo che costellano i viali del giardino della Villa – accompagnate da libri-erbari, “quaderni che recano annotazioni personali e disegni”, e medaglioni di porcellana su cui sono raffigurate le stesse immagini funebri. La parola che dà nome alla mostra, ROMAMOR (2019), appare in neon nel portico dell’Atelier Balthus in omaggio a questa città così importante da un punto di vista artistico e umano per i due artisti.Continue Reading..

08
Apr

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso

L’artista belga di fama mondiale Jan Fabre torna a Napoli con un nuovo progetto che coinvolge quattro luoghi di grande prestigio: il Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, la chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, il Museo Madre e la galleria Studio Trisorio.

Al Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte, l’artista esporrà un gruppo di lavori in dialogo con una selezione speciale di opere d’arte provenienti dalla collezione permanente del museo e da altre istituzioni museali napoletane.  La mostra, dal titolo Oro Rosso. Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue, curata da Stefano Causa insieme a Blandine Gwizdala, inaugurerà il 30 marzo e vedrà sculture in oro e disegni di sangue creati dall’artista dagli anni Settanta ad oggi, oltre a una serie inedita e sorprendente di sculture in corallo rosso, realizzata appositamente per Capodimonte.

Le opere di Fabre si porranno in dialogo con alcuni capolavori pittorici e splendidi oggetti d’arte decorativa di epoca rinascimentale, manierista e barocca selezionati Stefano Causa; come dice lo stesso curatore: “Fabre racconta, in una lingua non troppo diversa, una vicenda di metamorfosi incessanti; di materiali che mutano destinazione e funzione; una storia di sangue e umori corporali, inganni e trappole del senso; pietre preziose, coralli e scarabei, usciti a pioggia dai residuati di una tomba egizia, frammenti di armature, sequenze di numeri e citazioni dalle Scritture, dentro un universo centrifugo di segni…che, talvolta, diventa un sottobosco nel quale calarsi con i pennellini di uno specialista fiammingo di nature morte”.
In mostra, le sculture dorate di Jan Fabre danno corpo prezioso alle idee dell’artista sulla creazione, sull’arte e sul suo rapporto con i grandi maestri del passato. Nei disegni di sangue si ritrovano invece le più profonde motivazioni dell’artista, le sue sperimentazioni, il suo manifesto poetico, fisico, intimo.
“Il sangue oggi è oro” – dice Jan Fabre – e nell’esposizione al Museo di Capodimonte l’artista mette in scena un intero universo di simboli che parlano d’arte e di bellezza, di forza e fragilità del genere umano, del ciclo continuo di vita-morte-rinascita.
Il corallo è stato chiamato “oro rosso”, per la sua preziosità e per la sua valenza apotropaica. Come scrive la critica d’arte Melania Rossi sul catalogo della mostra edito da Electa: “Le dieci nuove sculture di corallo rosso che il maestro belga ha creato per la sua mostra personale al museo di Capodimonte sembrano un tesoro proveniente dagli abissi della mente dell’artista. Concrezioni che fanno pensare a fantasiose barriere coralline assumono alcune tra le forme più care a Fabre: teschi, cuori anatomici, croci, spade e pugnali. A loro volta, poi, costellati d’immagini e segni che alludono ad altri significati e ad altre storie, in un ciclo continuo di connessioni fino a creare antichi ibridi tra natura e simbolo, nuovi idoli tra passato e futuro”.
Sempre dal 30 marzo, a cura di Melania Rossi, la scultura di Jan Fabre The man who bears the cross (L’uomo che sorregge la croce)(2015), sarà visibile nella chiesa del Pio Monte della Misericordia, in dialogo diretto con il capolavoro di Caravaggio Sette opere di Misericordia (1606-1607).
La scultura, realizzata completamente in cera, è un autoritratto dell’artista, basato sui tratti somatici dello zio Jaak Fabre, che tiene in bilico una croce di oltre due metri sul palmo della mano. Nel rituale auto-rappresentativo l’artista esce da sé stesso e diviene qualunque uomo, lo specchio di ognuno di noi. Scrive la curatrice: “L’uomo che sorregge la croce (2015) è la rappresentazione dell’interrogarsi, è la celebrazione del dubbio, e con la sua collocazione all’interno del Pio Monte della Misericordia sembra aggiungere un’ottava Opera di Misericordia: confortare chi dubita. Nel dipinto di Caravaggio, il bello e il vero coincidono mirabilmente e la sua opera è un incredibile intreccio di luce e buio in cui la volontà di rappresentare la verità dell’essere umano del 1600 trova piena soddisfazione. Tutta la ricerca di Jan Fabre, artista del nostro tempo, va nella stessa direzione; il ciclo vita-morte-rinascita è centrale nel suo pensiero in cui religione e scienza, simbolo e corpo si compenetrano in un vortice geniale di immagini e azioni”. Il confronto tra il linguaggio seicentesco di Caravaggio e quello contemporaneo fiammingo di Fabre accenderà nuove riflessioni, segnando un ideale e virtuoso passaggio di testimone tra passato e presente artistici.

Dal 30 marzo, inoltre, il Museo Madre, a cura di Andrea VilianiMelania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, ospiterà in anteprima l’iconica sculturaL’uomo che misura le nuvole (2018), in un’inedita versione in marmo di Carrara allestita nel Cortile d’onore del museo regionale d’arte contemporanea.
Dopo la presentazione nel 2008 e nel 2017 della versione in bronzo della stessa scultura in Piazza del Plebiscito e sul terrazzo del museo, Jan Fabre torna a celebrare al Madre la capacità di immaginare, sognare e conoscere, elevandosi oltre il nostro destino di esseri umani. L’uomo che misura le nuvole si ispira dall’affermazione che l’ornitologo Robert Stroud pronunciò nel momento della liberazione dalla prigione di Alcatraz, quando dichiarò che si sarebbe d’ora in poi dedicato appunto a “misurare le nuvole”. Come artista e ricercatore, Fabre tenta costantemente, in effetti, di misurare le nuvole, ovvero di dichiarare con la sua opera che se la tensione verso il sapere ha limiti invalicabili è però possibile esprimere l’inesprimibile attraverso la ricerca artistica, e dare quindi rappresentazione all’intrinseca e fondativa bellezza umana e universale.

Presso la storica galleria Studio Trisorio, sarà esposta una selezione di opere di Jan Fabre realizzate completamente con di gusci di scarabei iridescenti.
La mostra, dal titolo Tribute to Hieronymus Bosch in Congo (Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo), a cura di Melania Rossi e Laura Trisorio, inaugurerà il 29 marzo e vedrà dei grandi pannelli e delle sculture a mosaico di scarabei ispirati alla triste e violenta storia della colonizzazione del Congo belga. In queste opere, l’ispirazione storica si unisce alla simbologia medioevale tratta da uno dei più grandi maestri fiamminghi, uno dei maestri putativi di Jan Fabre, Hieronymus Bosch, e in particolare dal suo capolavoro Il Giardino delle Delizie (1480-1490).
L’inferno di Bosch, ammirato per la sua spiccata inventiva, per molti aspetti divenne una realtà raccapricciante nel Congo Belga. L’opera d’arte è proprio questa combinazione unica di forma e contenuto. L’artista ci porta in una zona indefinita, tra il Paradiso e il Congo Belga, in un’illusione di libertà, in un luogo lontano, sia mitico che concreto, attraverso una polisemia di immagini dell’esistenza umana.

Jan Fabre. Oro Rosso
Sculture d’oro e corallo, disegni di sangue.
Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
Via Miano 2, Napoli
30 marzo – 15 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che sorregge la croce.
Pio Monte della Misericordia
Via dei Tribunali 253, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. Omaggio a Hieronymus Bosch in Congo.

Studio Trisorio
Riviera di Chiaia 215, Napoli
29 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

Jan Fabre. L’uomo che misura le nuvole
Museo Madre
Via Luigi Settembrini 79, Napoli
30 marzo – 30 settembre 2019

NAPOLI: Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte e altre sedi
Dal 29 Marzo 2019 al 30 Settembre 2019
Ente promotore: MiBAC – Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte
T.+39 081 7499111
mu-cap@beniculturali.it

Immagine: Jan Fabre, Golden Human Brain with Angel Wings, 2011. Nero Assoluto / bronzo silicato, oro 24 carati, granito Nero Assoluto, 28×30,5×26 cm

29
Mar

Jenny Holzer: Thing Indescribable

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jenny Holzer: Thing Indescribable, a survey of work by one of the most outstanding artists of our time. Sponsored by the Fundación BBVA, this exhibition features new works, including a series of light projections on the facade of the museum, which can be viewed each night from March 21 to March 30. Holzer’s work has been part of the museum’s fabric since its beginnings, in the form of the imposing Installation for Bilbao (1997). Installed in the atrium, the work—commissioned for the museum’s opening—is made up of nine luminous columns, each more than 12 meters high. Since last year, this site-specific work has been complemented by Arno Pair (2010), a set of engraved stone benches gifted to the museum by the artist.

The reflections, ideas, arguments, and sorrows that Holzer has articulated over a career of more than 40 years will be presented in a variety of distinct installations, each with an evocative social dimension. Her medium—whether emblazoned on a T-shirt, a plaque, a painting, or an LED sign—is language. Distributing text in public space is an integral aspect of her work, starting in the 1970s with posters covertly pasted throughout New York City and continuing in her more recent light projections onto landscape and architecture.

Visitors to this exhibition will experience the evolving scope of the artist’s practice, which addresses the fundamental themes of human existence—including power, violence, belief, memory, love, sex, and killing. Her art speaks to a broad and ever-changing public through unflinching, concise, and incisive language. Holzer’s aim is to engage the viewer by creating evocative spaces that invite a reaction, a thought, or the taking of a stand, leaving the sometimes anonymous artist in the background.

Jenny Holzer
Thing Indescribable
March 22–September 9, 2019

Guggenheim Bilbao
Abandoibarra et.2
48001 Bilbao
Spain

jennyholzer.guggenheim-bilbao.eus

Curated by: Petra Joos, curator of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Image: Jenny Holzer, Survival, 1989

28
Mar

Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth (Né altra Né questa: La sfida al Labirinto) is the title of the exhibition for the Italian Pavilion at the 58th Venice Biennale, curated by Milovan Farronato and featuring work by Enrico David (Ancona, 1966), Chiara Fumai (Rome, 1978–Bari, 2017) and Liliana Moro (Milan, 1961).

The subtitle of the project alludes to La sfida al labirinto (The Challenge to the Labyrinth), a seminal essay written by Italo Calvino in 1962 that has been the inspiration for Neither Nor. In this text the author proposed a cultural work open to all possible languages and that felt itself co-responsible in the construction of a world which, having lost its traditional points of reference, no longer asked to be simply represented. To visualize the intricate forms of contemporary reality, Calvino turned to the vivid metaphor of the labyrinth: an apparent maze of lines and tendencies that is in reality constructed on the basis of strict rules.

Interpreting this line of thought in an artistic context, Neither Nor—whose Italian title, Né altra Né questa, already uses the rhetorical figure of the anastrophe to disorientate—gives agency to a project of ‘challenge to the labyrinth’ that takes Calvino’s lesson on board by staging an exhibition whose layout is not linear and cannot be reduced to a set of tidy and predictable trajectories. Many generous journeys and interpretations are offered to the public, whom the exhibition entrusts with the chance to take on an active role in determining the route they will take and thereby find themselves confronted with the result of their own choices, accepting doubt and uncertainty as inescapable parts of understanding.

The exhibition is accompanied by a Public Program including talks by Enrico David, Liliana Moro and Prof. Marco Pasi, as well as the presentation of Bustrofedico (“Boustrophedon”), a new experimental short film by Italian filmmaker Anna Franceschini documenting the exhibition, produced by In Between Art Film and Gluck50, to be premiered in Venice at the end of the show. The Educational Program, promoted by the Directorate-General for Contemporary Art and Architecture and Urban Peripheries (DGAAP) of the Ministry for the Cultural Heritage and Activities, invites participants to collectively study and perform a choreography conceived by Christodoulos Panayiotou (Limassol, Cyprus, 1978), inspired by the ‘Dance of the Cranes’ which, according to the ancient Greek poet Callimachus, celebrated Theseus’s escape from the Labyrinth of Knossos. The Programs are curated by Milovan Farronato, Stella Bottai and Lavinia Filippi, and will be held in the spaces of the Italian Pavilion.

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth will be accompanied by a bilingual catalogue published by Humboldt Books, with essays by Stella Bottai, Italo Calvino, Enrico David, Milovan Farronato, Lavinia Filippi, Chiara Fumai, Liliana Moro, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Emanuele Trevi.

The Italian Pavilion is realized also with the support of Gucci and FPT Industrial, main sponsors of the exhibition, and the contribution of the main donor Nicoletta Fiorucci Russo. Special thanks also go to all the other donors for their fundamental contributions to the project; we are grateful as well to the technical sponsors Gemmo, C&C-Milano and Select Aperitivo.

Neither Nor: The challenge to the Labyrinth
Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale
May 11–November 24, 2019

Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale
Arsenale
Venice
Italy

www.neithernor.it

Commissioned by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Activities
DGAAP – Directorate-General for Contemporary Art and Architecture Urban Peripheries
Commissioner: Federica Galloni, Director General DGAAP

Curated by Milovan Farronato

source: e-flux

25
Mar

Surrealist Lee Miller

Preferisco fare una foto, che essere una foto”.
Lee Miller

Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea sono lieti di presentare la mostra “Surrealist Lee Miller”, la prima italiana della retrospettiva dedicata ad una delle fotografe più importanti del Novecento. Lanciata da Condé Nast, sulla copertina di Vogue nel 1927, Lee Miller fin da subito diventa una delle modelle più apprezzate e richieste dalle riviste di moda. Molti i fotografi che la ritraggono – Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Huene o Arnold Genthe – e innumerevoli i servizi fotografici di cui è stata protagonista, fino a quando – all’incirca due anni più tardi – la Miller non decide di passare dall’altra parte dell’obiettivo. Donna caparbia e intraprendente, rimane colpita profondamente dalle immagini del fotografo più importante dell’epoca, Man Ray, che riesce ad incontrare diventandone modella e musa ispiratrice. Ma, cosa più importante, instaura con lui un duraturo sodalizio artistico e professionale che assieme li porterà a sviluppare la tecnica della solarizzazione. Amica di Picasso, di Ernst, Cocteau, Mirò e di tutta la cerchia dei surrealisti, Miller in questi anni apre a Parigi il suo primo studio diventando nota come ritrattista e fotografa di moda, anche se il nucleo più importante di opere in questo periodo è certamente rappresentato dalle immagini surrealiste, molte delle quali erroneamente attribuite a Man Ray. A questo corpus appartengono le celebri Nude bent forward, Condom e Tanja Ramm under a bell jar, opere presenti in mostra, accanto ad altri celebri scatti che mostrano appieno come il percorso artistico di Lee Miller sia stato, non solo autonomo, ma tecnicamente maturo e concettualmente sofisticato. Dopo questa prima parentesi formativa, nel 1932 Miller decide di tornare a New York per aprire un nuovo studio fotografico che, nonostante il successo, chiude due anni più tardi quando per seguire il marito – il ricco uomo d’affari egiziano Aziz Eloui Bey – si trasferisce al Cairo.  Intraprende lunghi viaggi nel deserto e fotografa villaggi e rovine, iniziando a confrontarsi con la fotografia di reportage, un genere che Lee Miller porta avanti anche negli anni successivi quando, insieme a Roland Penrose – l’artista surrealista che sarebbe diventato il suo secondo marito – viaggia sia nel sud che nell’est europeo. Poco prima dello scoppio della Seconda Guerra Mondiale, nel 1939, lascia l’Egitto per trasferirsi a Londra, ed ignorando gli ordini dall’ambasciata americana di tornare in patria, inizia a lavorare come fotografa freelance per Vogue. Documenta gli incessanti bombardamenti su Londra ma il suo contributo più importante arriverà nel 1944 quando è corrispondente accreditata al seguito delle truppe americane e collaboratrice del fotografo David E. Scherman per le riviste “Life” e “Time”.  Fu lei l’unica fotografa donna a seguire gli alleati durante il D-Day, a documentare le attività al fronte a durante la liberazione.
Le sue fotografie ci testimoniano in modo vivido e mai didascalico l’assedio di St. Malo, la Liberazione di Parigi, i combattimenti in Lussemburgo e in Alsazia e, inoltre, la liberazione dei campi di concentramento di Dachau e Buchenwald. È proprio in questi giorni febbrili che viene fatta la scoperta degli appartamenti di Hitler a Monaco di Baviera ed è qui che scatta quella che probabilmente è la sua fotografia più celebre: l’autoritratto nella vasca da bagno del Führer. Dopo la guerra Lee Miller ha continuato a scattare per Vogue per altri due anni, occupandosi di moda e celebrità, ma lo stress post traumatico riportato in seguito alla permanenza al fronte contribuì al suo lento ritirarsi dalla scena artistica, anche se il suo apporto alle biografie scritte da Penrose su Picasso, Mirò, Man Ray e Tapies fu fondamentale, sia come apparato fotografico che aneddotico.
La mostra (14 marzo – 9 giugno 2019), organizzata da Palazzo Pallavicini e curata da ONO arte contemporanea, si compone di 101 fotografie che ripercorrono l’intera carriera artistica della fotografa, attraverso quelli che sono i suoi scatti più famosi ed iconici, compresa la sessione realizzata negli appartamenti di Hitler, raramente esposte anche a livello internazionale e mai diffuse a mezzo stampa per l’uso improprio fattone negli anni da gruppi neonazisti.Per ulteriori informazioni sull’archivio Lee Miller www.leemiller.co.uk

Palazzo Pallavicini
via San Felice, 24 – Bologna

Surrealist Lee Miller
dal 14 marzo al 9 giugno 2019

ORARI: Da giovedì a domenica: 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso). Chiuso il lunedì, martedì e mercoledì. Aperture straordinarie: 22 e 25 aprile 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 1 maggio 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso); 2 giugno 11-20 (ore 19 ultimo ingresso)

ENTI PROMOTORI: Palazzo Pallavicini e ONO arte contemporanea

INFO: +39 3313471504 – info@palazzopallavicini.com

Image: Charlie Chaplin by Lee Miller © Lee Miller Archives England 2018. All Rights Reserved