Tag: Tate Modern

08
Feb

Olafur Eliasson: In real life

This summer, Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) will return to Tate Modern following his world-renowned Turbine Hall installation The weather project in 2003, for an unmissable exhibition of his career to date. Marking the most comprehensive solo presentation of Eliasson’s work, and his first major survey in the UK, Olafur Eliasson: In real life will offer a timely opportunity to experience the immersive world of this endlessly inquisitive artist.

Olafur Eliasson consistently seeks to make his art relevant to society, engaging the public in memorable ways both inside and outside the gallery. Driven by his interests in perception, movement, and the interaction of people and their environments, he creates artworks which offer experiences that can be shared by visitors of all ages. Tate Modern will bring together over 30 works spanning the last three decades – from celebrated early installations like Beauty 1993, to new paintings and sculptures. For the first time, the exhibition will also examine Eliasson’s wider collaborations in fields as diverse as sustainability, migration, education and architecture, allowing viewers to explore how these projects extend his artistic practice. Each installation, or group of works, will encompass a key theme explored within Eliasson’s career. This will include his early investigations into space, motion and natural phenomena – as explored in Moss wall 1994, featuring lichen native to Eliasson’s homeland Iceland – to extensive experiments with light, colour, geometry, perception and participation that characterise his work today – such as Stardust particle 2016. Other installations like Your spiral view 2002 and Your uncertain shadow (black and white) 2010 incorporate reflections and shadows to play with the way we navigate or perceive the world. Together they reflect the artist’s core principle of ‘seeing yourself sensing’. As the works reveal the mechanisms behind their own making, we are invited to consider the physical and psychological processes that contribute to how we experience them. The exhibition will culminate with a space exploring Eliasson’s deep engagement with social and environmental issues. This includes projects such as Little Sun, first launched at Tate Modern in 2012, which provides solar-powered lamps and chargers to communities without access to electricity; Green Light – An Artistic Workshop, hosted by various institutions around the world, in which asylum seekers and refugees, together with members of the public, construct Green light lamps and take part in an accompanying educational programme; and Ice Watch, an installation, recently experienced by visitors to Tate Modern and passers-by, featuring glacial ice from Greenland which aims to inspire public action against climate change. Eliasson’s wide-ranging architectural projects will be explored here, including the recently completed Fjordenhus in Denmark. Viewers will also get behind-the-scenes insight into how Studio Olafur Eliasson works day to day and will be able to engage in collaborative making activities. Not confined to the gallery walls, Eliasson’s work will extend onto the terrace outside Tate Modern, while further installations such as Room for one colour 1997 will animate the concourse outside the galleries. For the duration of the exhibition Studio Olafur Eliasson will also collaborate with Tate Eats on a special menu for Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar. This will be based on organic, vegetarian and ethically sourced produce that is central to the Studio’s own kitchen in Berlin, where studio members eat family-style meals together every day.Continue Reading..

11
Nov

Alexander Calder. Performing Sculpture

11 November 2015 – 3 April 2016
Tate Modern, Level 3
Open daily from 10.00 – 18.00 and until 22.00 on Friday and Saturday

Tate Modern presents the UK’s largest ever exhibition of Alexander Calder (1898-1976). Calder was one of the truly ground-breaking artists of the 20th century and as a pioneer of kinetic sculpture, played an essential role in shaping the history of modernism. Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture will bring together approximately 100 works to reveal how Calder turned sculpture from a static object into a continually changing work to be experienced in real time.

Alexander Calder initially trained as an engineer before attending painting courses at the Arts Students League in New York. He travelled to Paris in the 1920s where he developed his wire sculptures and by 1931 had invented the mobile, a term first coined by Marcel Duchamp to describe Calder’s motorised objects. The exhibition traces the evolution of his distinct vocabulary – from his initial years captivating the artistic bohemia of inter-war Paris, to his later life spent between the towns of Roxbury in Connecticut and Sachéin France.

The exhibition will feature the figurative wire portraits Calder created of other artists including Joan Miró 1930 and Fernand Léger c.1930, alongside depictions of characters related to the circus, the cabaret and other mass spectacles of popular entertainment, including Two Acrobats 1929, The Brass Family 1929 and Aztec Josephine Baker c.1929. Following a visit to the studio of Piet Mondrian in 1930,where he was impressed with the environment-as-installation, Calder created abstract, three-dimensional, kinetic forms and suspended vividly coloured shapes in front of panels or within frames hung on the wall. Red Panel 1936, White Panel 1936 and Snake and the Cross 1936 exemplify the artist’s continuous experimentation with forms in space and the potential for movement to inspire new sculptural possibilities. They will be shown together with a selection of other panels and open frames for the first time, illustrating this important moment in Calder’s development.

Continue Reading..

11
Lug

GIACOMETTI

Tate Modern presents the UK’s first major retrospective of Alberto Giacometti for 20 years

Celebrated as a sculptor, painter and draughtsman, Alberto Giacometti’s distinctive elongated figures are some of the most instantly recognisable works of modern art. This exhibition reasserts Giacometti’s place alongside the likes of Matisse, Picasso and Degas as one of the great painter-sculptors of the 20th century. Through unparalleled access to the extraordinary collection and archive of the Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, Paris, Tate Modern’s ambitious and wide-ranging exhibition brings together over 250 works. It includes rarely seen plasters and drawings which have never been exhibited before and showcases the full evolution of Giacometti’s career across five decades, from early works such as Head of a Woman [Flora Mayo] 1926 to iconic bronze sculptures such as Walking Man I 1960.

While Alberto Giacometti is best known for his bronze figures, Tate Modern is repositioning him as an artist with a far wider interest in materials and textures, especially plaster and clay. The elasticity and malleability of these media allowed him to work in an inventive way, continuously reworking and experimenting with plaster to create his distinctive highly textured and scratched surfaces. A large number of these fragile plaster works which rarely travel are being shown for the first time in this exhibition including Giacometti’s celebrated Women of Venice 1956. Created for the Venice Biennale, this group of important works are brought together for the first time since their creation.

The exhibition also explores some of the key figures in the artist’s life who were vital to his work including his wife Annette Giacometti, his brother Diego and his late mistress Caroline. Alberto Giacometti’s personal relationships were an enduring influence throughout his career and he continuously used friends and family as models. One room in the exhibition focusses specifically on portraits demonstrating Giacometti’s intensely observed images of the human face and figure.

I am very interested in art but I am instinctively more interested in truth […] The more I work, the more I see differently
Alberto Giacometti

Tate Modern
GIACOMETTI
UNTIL 10 SEPTEMBER 2017

07
Mag

Mona Hatoum

Mona Hatoum creates a challenging vision of our world, exposing its contradictions and complexities. Hot Spot is a steel cage-like neon globe which buzzes with an intense, mesmerising yet seemingly dangerous energy. Elsewhere electricity crackles through household objects, making the familiar uncanny.
This is the first major survey of Hatoum’s work in the UK, covering 35 years from her early radical performances and video pieces, to sculptures and large-scale installations.
Born in Beirut in 1952 to a Palestinian family, Mona Hatoum settled in England in 1975 after war broke out in Lebanon. She is represented in major collections around the world, has shown at the Venice Biennale in 1995 and 2005, was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1995, received the Joan Miró Prize in 2011 and will be awarded the Hiroshima Art Prize in 2017.
Through the juxtaposition of opposites such as beauty and horror, Hatoum engages us in conflicting emotions of desire and revulsion, fear and fascination.
Immerse yourself in the work of one of the most important artists working today.

“One of the most important and powerful artists of her generation finally gets the big British show she deserves”
–The Sunday Time

Mona Hatoum
May 4–August 21, 2016

Artist’s talk: Mona Hatoum: May 10, 6:30–8pm
Mona Hatoum: Piercing the Object—Inventing the Self: June 1, 6:30–8:30pm, speakers include Layal Ftouni and Adania Shibli in a panel discussion
Curator’s tour: June 27, 6:30–8:30pm, led by Clarrie Wallis, Curator of Modern and Contemporary British Art

Tate Modern
Bankside
London SE1 9TG
United Kingdom

Image: Mona Hatoum. Impenetrable 2009 © Mona Hatoum Photo Florian Kleinefenn Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris

 

03
Feb

Alexander Calder. Performing Sculpture

11 November 2015 – 3 April 2016
Tate Modern, Level 3
Open daily from 10.00 – 18.00 and until 22.00 on Friday and Saturday

Tate Modern presents the UK’s largest ever exhibition of Alexander Calder (1898-1976). Calder was one of the truly ground-breaking artists of the 20th century and as a pioneer of kinetic sculpture, played an essential role in shaping the history of modernism. Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture will bring together approximately 100 works to reveal how Calder turned sculpture from a static object into a continually changing work to be experienced in real time.

Alexander Calder initially trained as an engineer before attending painting courses at the Arts Students League in New York. He travelled to Paris in the 1920s where he developed his wire sculptures and by 1931 had invented the mobile, a term first coined by Marcel Duchamp to describe Calder’s motorised objects. The exhibition traces the evolution of his distinct vocabulary – from his initial years captivating the artistic bohemia of inter-war Paris, to his later life spent between the towns of Roxbury in Connecticut and Sachéin France.

The exhibition will feature the figurative wire portraits Calder created of other artists including Joan Miró 1930 and Fernand Léger c.1930, alongside depictions of characters related to the circus, the cabaret and other mass spectacles of popular entertainment, including Two Acrobats 1929, The Brass Family 1929 and Aztec Josephine Baker c.1929. Following a visit to the studio of Piet Mondrian in 1930,where he was impressed with the environment-as-installation, Calder created abstract, three-dimensional, kinetic forms and suspended vividly coloured shapes in front of panels or within frames hung on the wall. Red Panel 1936, White Panel 1936 and Snake and the Cross 1936 exemplify the artist’s continuous experimentation with forms in space and the potential for movement to inspire new sculptural possibilities. They will be shown together with a selection of other panels and open frames for the first time, illustrating this important moment in Calder’s development.

Continue Reading..